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Peruvian Tourist Visa

Peruvian Tourist Visa

A Guide to Peruvian Visas

Part 1

When planning a trip to Peru, eventually bureaucratic and visa related matters come to mind. As finding detailed and up-to-date information on this topic can be challenging, we put together comprehensive information and advice on all Peruvian tourist visa issues that might pop up.

 

Content overview

 

Peruvian tourist visa in a nutshell

  • Nationals of some countries need a tourist visa and have to apply for it at a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru; see PDF under attachments at the end of this really long article to find out if you have to apply for a tourist visa.
  • Nationals of other countries can travel visa-free to Peru and receive a "temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist for a certain time" (nothing more than an entry stamp and an entry in the Migraciones database) at the Peruvian border or airport upon entry.
  • Most nationalities that can travel visa-free to Peru are allowed to stay up to 90 days in a 180-day period for touristic, recreational or health purposes (see attached PDF at the end of this really long article to find out if you can enter Peru visa-free and how long you can stay).
  • Peruvian tourist visas are single entry visas.
  • All visitors coming to Peru need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival.
  • As in nearly all countries around the globe, foreigners are not allowed to work or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity while being in Peru on a tourist visa / temporary authorization to enter as a tourist.
  • Tourists can only sign legally binding documents (work contract, sworn statement needed, for example, for changing your immigration status, car or apartment purchase, marriage license, ...) with a so called "Permiso para firmar contratos".
  • Extensions of tourist visas / authorizations to enter as a tourist aren't possible
 

Do I need a visa to enter Peru as a tourist?

Peru is a very welcoming country that signed agreements with many countries, allowing the citizens to travel visa-free to Peru. Citizens of below mentioned countries do not have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian embassy or consulate before coming to the county. They only need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival to get a “temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist for a certain time” (sounds great, but today is just an entry in the Migraciones datatbase and a stamp in your passport) directly at the immigration control at the airport or border. For a more detailed listing, please have a look at our PDF "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article for clarification.

Following nationals do not need a tourist visa for Peru

  • South America: Citizens of all South American countries except Venezuela
  • Central America: Citizens of most Central American countries (exception Cuba, El Salvador, Haiti and Nicaragua)
  • North America: Citizens of the United States, Canada and Mexico
  • Europe: Citizens of all countries within the European Union and Switzerland
  • Africa: Citizens of South Africa
  • Asia: Citizens of Brunei, Indonesia, Israel, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand; partly citizens of China and India: according to a supreme decree from September 2016 Chinese citizens and according to a supreme decree from March 2017 Indian citizens with a permanent residency or a visa with a validity of at least 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia can travel to Peru visa-free; other Chinese and Indian nationals still have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian embassy or consulate!
  • Oceania: Citizens of Australia and New Zealand
 

How and where to apply for a Peruvian tourist visa

As already mentioned above, citizens of some countries need a visa even for touristic and recreational purposes (please have a look at our PDF "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article for clarification.). As Peru doesn’t offer online visa applications, these nationals have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian diplomatic mission that has jurisdiction over their domicile or country of residence.

Requirements for the tourist visa application at a Peruvian Consulate

Required documents to apply for a tourist visa include, but may not be restricted to:

  • Application form
  • Valid passport
  • Round-trip ticket
  • Hotel reservation, tourist package reservation or invitation letter
  • Proof of sufficient funds
  • Passport photos
  • Proof of legal residency in the area or country under the consulates jurisdiction
  • Receipt for paid application fee

Please be aware that the embassy or consulate, where you apply, may invite you to a personal interview.

On the website of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) you find a world map showing all Peruvian consulates abroad. Just click on a marker and the address, phone number, e-mail and - if available - website of the consulate appears.

There is no Peruvian embassy or consulate in my country. Where do I apply?

Especially in Africa and Asia, where the residents of most countries still have to apply for a tourist visa, Peruvian embassies and consulates are scarce, website aren’t up-to-date and e-mails often aren't answered. So, finding the correct consulate, getting information and applying for the visa can be quite a challenge. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs unfortunately doesn't consistently publish which consulates have jurisdiction over which regions / countries. Therefore, if there is no Peruvian embassy or consulate in your country of residence, the only way to find out where and how to apply for a visa is by getting in contact with the nearest Peruvian diplomatic mission (which sometimes isn’t near at all) and ask if they are in charge or know who is.

 

How long can I stay in Peru as a tourist?

In March 2017, a new Peruvian Immigration Law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) went into effect, allowing tourists who can travel visa-free to Peru for touristic, recreational or health purposes to stay for a maximum of 183 days within a 365-day period. Shortly afterwards, the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs excluded Schengen States nationals from this general rule, allowing them only to stay for up to 90 days within a 180-day period. Then, in June 2019, a new publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) eliminated the general 183 days in a 365-day period granted by the immigration law for most nationalities.

Today, most nationalities who don’t have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru are only allowed up to 90 days in a 180-day period; the 180-day period isn't per half year from January to June or July to December but calculated from your first entry.

Brazilian, Chilean, and Mexican nationals as well as those Chinese and Indian passport holders with a permanent residency or a visa with a validity of at least 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia, who are still allowed visa-free up to 180 days should know that Peruvian immigration often only gives them 90 days as well.

In case you have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru, it’s up to the consulate to decide the number of days you can visit the country. Be aware that even if the consulate issued a 180-day tourist visa, often immigration officers still only give you 90 days when you enter.

While you generally can expect to get the full days allowed (if you haven’t overstayed your welcome before excessively or if you haven’t been in Peru before and now try to re-enter the country before your 180-day period is over), you should be aware that you aren't entitled to getting the full 90 (or 180) days. As everywhere around the globe, it’s at the discretion of the immigration officer if he or she lets you enter at all and how many days you are allowed to stay.

Please see our PDF " Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article to find out if you need a visa to enter Peru or if you can travel visa-free and how long you can stay - this PDF is an English translation of the original from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which can be found here.

 

Entering Peru

With the introduction of the new Immigration Law in 2017 and progressive digitalization, especially now in Covid times, entering Peru today is a quite easy, seemingly organized and at least for now quick process.

Requirements

After a complete shutdown, Peru re-opened the country for international air travel in October 2020. Strict health requirements and constantly changing travel regulations were implemented that are still in place today. Land borders only re-opened in mid-February 2022.

So, before traveling to Peru, please read our article “Covid entry requirements and travel regulations for Peru” and adhere to Peru's Covid rules and entry requirements.

After having closed all borders and having suspended all international and national travel by air, land, sea and river at the beginning of the pand...

Additionally, everyone - visitor, resident and Peruvian; adult and child; vaccinated or unvaccinated - who wants to enter Peru must present a Health Affidavit which can be easily and quickly obtained by filling out an online form provided by the Peruvian immigration office Migraciones in collaboration with the Peruvian Ministry of Health. See our article "Health Declaration for entering Peru" for information on how to get the affidavit.

As part of the Covid entry regulations, everyone - visitor, resident and Peruvian; adult and child; vaccinated or unvaccinated - who is flying into...

Furthermore, Peru asks everyone traveling to the country by air to pre-register his or her arrival in the country on an app. You can find detailed information about the app as well as how to register in our article “Pre-Registration at Peruvian Immigration before arrival”.

Since October 2020 everyone traveling to Peru by air is asked to pre-register his or her arrival in the country on an app. As pre-registered travel...

The pre-registration is not obligatory and the app often doesn't work properly. SO, you won't have any problems coming to Peru without having pre-registered.

Entry process

After leaving the plane (or at the border), you automatically end up at a control point of the Peruvian Ministry of Health where your vaccination certificate / negative PCR test result and your Health Declaration form are checked. Once this is done, just follow the flow to the immigration control; note: as of September 2022, the automated passport control machines at Lima’s airport that those visitors who pre-registered their arrival were supposed to use, are still out of order, so everyone has to proceed to the immigration counters.

Here just present your passport and, if you have pre-registered, the by the app generated QR code. As part of Corona hygiene measures, stamping of passports was eliminated in 2020, however, since May 2022 you get an entry stamp in your passport again, on which the number of days you are allowed to stay in the country as a tourist is written. And while for years you got a little white card, the TAM, today your visit as a tourist is just an entry in the Migraciones database, called TAM virtual.

If you later want to check which personal data is registered, how many days you were given when you entered the country or if for whatever reason you need to prove when you entered or left Peru, you can retrieve your Tam Virtual on the Migraciones website or the Agencia Digital. Find more information on how it's done in our article "How many days did I get when entering Peru?"

As part of the Corona hygiene measures, Peruvian immigration officers stopped stamping passports when entering the country in October 2020. For ove...

Once you are finished at the immigration counter, proceed to the baggage carousel and claim your luggage.

Clearing customs

Since June 2022, the good old customs declaration form has served its time and was replaced by the App "Bienvenido al Perú" which is available on iOS and Android and in short details which items have or haven’t to be declared. So, if you have something to declare, download the App, fill in required fields and once in Peru proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.

Peruvian customs urges travelers to know and comply with Peruvian customs regulations. So, it's up to you to inform yourself. Our article “What you can & can’t bring into Peru” helps with this.

When travelling to a foreign country it’s always a good idea to know which items you can take with no problems, and which ones you better leave at ...

  • If you have nothing to declare, you don’t have to do anything. Clear immigration, get your luggage and proceed to the exit.
  • If you have something to declare, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.
  • If you carry more than US$ 10,000, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once in Peru proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.

We highly recommend to be honest, as failing to declare taxable or dutiable items can result in fines of 50% of the custom value of the items if caught; failing to declare currency over US$ 10,000 results in a 30% fine on the amount you carry with you.

Before you can leave the airport, you and your luggage are scanned and you might be asked to follow an official for a thorough check of your luggage.

You made it! Welcome to Peru!

 

How many days did I get?

After not stamping passports during peak Corona times, since May 2022, tourists entering the country finally get an entry stamp again, making it easy to check how long you can stay in Peru. Just flick through the pages of your passport and find the entry stamp.

Peruvian entry stamp
Peruvian entry stamp 2022

In the middle of it, you see the date you entered Peru, above the number of days you are allowed to stay and below the immigration control post where you entered. So, by adding the number of days written there to your entry date, you know exactly by which date you have to leave Peru or, if you stay longer than that, from which day on you have to pay the overstay fine.

In case the stamp is, for example, smeared or you just can’t decipher the number of days, check out our article “How many days did I get when entering Peru?” which not only explains in detail the legal backgrounds but also gives you other options to check how many days you were given.

As part of the Corona hygiene measures, Peruvian immigration officers stopped stamping passports when entering the country in October 2020. For ove...

 

Extension of Peruvian tourist visa

Since August 2021, tourist visa extensions aren't possible anymore.

You can find detailed background information on the topic in our article "Tourist Visa extension in Peru".

For years, it wasn’t possible to extend your tourist visa / (for those who can travel visa free to Peru) once you entered Peru) temporary authoriza...

 

Expired Peruvian tourist visa

Like in any other country, we recommend respecting the rules and regulations here in Peru, including the time you are allowed to stay in the country as a tourist.

However, if you overstayed your tourist visa or, if you can travel visa-free to Peru, your authorization to enter and stay as a tourist (which today is just an entry in a database) a few days, weeks or even months - at least for now - you rarely have to fear extreme consequences. When leaving Peru you just have to pay a fine of S/ 4.60 (2022, 0.1% of an UIT) per day you overstayed. The fee can be paid at a small counter before passing immigrations at the airport, at a border, on pagalo.pe, Peru's online payment platform, or at a branch of the Banco de la Nacion.

In our article "Peruvian Overstay fine for tourists" we explain the process in detail.

Tourists who stayed longer than the number of days they were given when they entered Peru, must pay a fine when leaving the country. While this usu...

Once the fine is paid, you can usually leave Peru with no reprisals.

Those having excessively overstayed their welcome (we are talking about many months or even years), however, might be additionally sanctioned with a re-entry ban for a certain time.

 

Border-hopping Peru

Between 2008 and 2017, border hopping was an easy and popular way to “renew” your tourist visa. Back then, the Peruvian foreigner law stated that visitors can enter Peru for touristic, recreational, or health purposes for 183 days. It however didn't mention if the 183 days were per year or per visit. So, many foreigners used this little gap in the old Peruvian immigration law to live in the country on a tourist visa. As soon as their visa was about to expire, they just crossed the border, stayed 5 minutes, a day or two, in one of Peru’s neighboring countries and returned asking immigrations for another 183 days. For years, this worked absolutely fine.

After the introduction of the new foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) which rectified the loophole in 2017 and the reduction of the time most nationalities can stay visa-free in Peru two years later, Peruvian border officials got stricter and increasingly applied the new rules giving foreigners only the back then allowed 90 or 183 days in a 180 days or 365 days period and didn’t let border-hoppers re-enter (or only for a few days) when they already stayed the maximum allowed time as visitor in the country.

Then in March 2020, Covid hit the country, borders were closed and Migraciones worked hard on digitalizing certain processes and procedures. Now, all entries and exits are saved in the Migraciones database and can be retrieved at all control points.

Since August 2021, travelers, who already stayed their allowed 90 days in a 180-day period, reported that when trying to re-enter the country at Lima’s airport before their 180-day period was over, that they were scolded and only given anything between 3 and 30 days. And according to reports from travelers who tried to re-enter Peru at a land border (which opened in February of 2022) after already having stayed their 90 days, immigrations often only gave a few days up to a month.

Nevertheless, it seems that the times of border-hopping are over and foreigners wanting to stay longer in Peru should work on getting a "real" temporary visa (for example, a temporary work visa or a temporary student visa) or resident visa.

 

Do I need a return ticket when travelling to Peru?

Peruvian law requires that foreign visitors need a return or onward passage out of the country if they aren't residents, proving that they leave the country when the visa or temporary authorization to enter expires. But the law doesn't state that this return or onward passage must be an airline ticket; it could be anything proving that you leave the Peru when the time comes.

When entering the country, Peruvian immigration officials hardly ever ask to see this proof. The ones executing above regulations are usually the airlines. As they could be held responsible and have to fly you back, if denied entry to Peru, most airlines require a return or onward flight ticket to even let you check-in for your flight to Peru.

So, if you plan to come to Peru on a one-way ticket, it’s best to check the requirements of your carrier. Some insist on a flight ticket showing that you leave the country, others accept a reservation for a return flight, a few are happy with a bus ticket and there are as well airlines that let you fly with just a one-way ticket.

If your airline requests a return or onward ticket, you could always make a reservation for one, print the confirmation, and then depending on the agency, you either don't pay it and let it expire or cancel it within a certain time. Other options include buying a fully refundable ticket or more affordable "renting" a ticket.

 

Can I work in Peru when on a tourist visa?

No!

A Peruvian tourist visa / temporary authorization for tourists allows entry for touristic, recreational, or health purposes only. Even though there are quite a few foreigners working on a tourist visa in Peru, Peruvian law explicitly prohibits to work or to receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity while visiting Peru as a tourist.

 

Can I study or do an internship in Peru on a tourist visa?

Generally no, sometimes yes.

For more information, please have a look at our detailed article "Peruvian Student Visa".

Peruvian Student Visa

Peruvian Visa Types
Foreigners planning to study at a Peruvian educational institution or to do an internship / apprenticeship (without payment!) at a Peruvian company...

 

Can I sign legally binding documents in Peru when on a tourist visa?

No!

Before signing a legally binding document (work contract, sworn statements, car or apartment purchase, marriage license, ...) tourists have to apply for a so called "Permiso para firmar contratos". Our article "Permit to sign contracts" explains in detail how it works and what you have to do.

Foreign visitors, who entered Peru as tourists or temporary visa holders such as temporary students, have to apply for a special permit called “Per...

 

Can I volunteer in Peru when on a tourist visa?

Officially, no! But in reality, it's done all the time. Find more information in our article "Peruvian Volunteer Visa".

While Peru has a volunteer visa, the so-called “visa cooperante” (cooperation visa), getting one is such a bureaucratic mess and in most cases not ...

 

!!! As visa and entry regulations can change quickly without prior notice, we highly recommend confirming current visa requirements with the nearest Peruvian embassy or consulate !!!

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  • This commment is unpublished.
    Sean · 02/10/2022
    Hola!

    If i read this correctly as an america want to move there when i retire, but that is a few years off and i will need to work remotely until then. Any advice?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 03/10/2022
      @Sean Hello Sean,

      I don’t understand what advice you are looking for and what your plans are.

      Do you want to move to Peru now? Or when you retire in a few years?

      If you are planning to move to Peru when you retire, your best option is to apply for a rentista residente visa. You find more information about this resident visa, including requirements and how to apply in our article “Peruvian retirement visa”.

      If you want to move to Peru now, depending on your circumstances, getting a proper resident visa might be difficult. As a tourist, you can only stay in Peru up to 90 days in a 180-day period; so, max 3 months in Peru and then at least 3 months out of Peru. Not really an option for a long-term stay.

      Since March 2017, Peru offers the so-called "independent work visa" (trabajador residente independiente). This visa gives independent professionals (for example, freelancers) the right to stay long term and work legally in Peru without being employed by a Peruvian company; however, a "service contract" with a Peruvian company has to be presented. The requirements and application process are the same as the ones for a work visa; but instead of the work contract, you have to have a service contract.

      Then another option for you to get a Peruvian resident visa might be to set up a Peruvian company as a foreigner (be aware that you need a Peruvian (silent) partner who owns a small percentage), then employ yourself as the general manager, get your work contract approved by the Peruvian Ministry of Labor and then apply for a work visa. I highly recommended to discuss the details with a trusted Peruvian notary or lawyer.

      Other options include marrying a Peruvian and apply for a family visa; invest S/ 500,000 and apply for an investment visa; extend your knowledge, study at a Peruvian university and apply for a student visa.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    williams · 11/09/2022
    hola-

    maybe i missed it in the article. recently, i received 90days on arrival. i got a copy of migration document from a hotel and it stated 90 days. "if" i stay over 90day and up to 180 days. it is 4.6soles per day from day 90 to day 180 payable at the airport at passport control?

    this was similar to 2021 i paid "a" 85-day overage at the airport?

    william

    us passport
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 11/09/2022
      @williams Hello William,

      In our above Tourist Visa article, you find a short explanations about having to pay a fine for overstaying in Peru under chapter “Expired tourist visa”.

      Additionally, our article “Peruvian Overstay Fine for tourists” is dedicated entirely to the overstaying topic including the legal backgrounds, implications and how and where to pay the fine.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Calvin · 06/09/2022
    Hello!

    I entered Peru on May 14, 2022 and because I counted the days wrong I stayed until August 19, 2022 (one week past the 90 days). I’m just curious what day I can re-enter Peru and get another tourist visa. I believe it’s 180 days after May 14,2022 but not sure. Let me know when you get the chance, thank you!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 06/09/2022
      @Calvin Hello Calvin.

      Most nationalities are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist up to 90 days in a 180-day period; so, at most three months in Peru and at least three months out of Peru. Additionally, tourists can only be in Peru for a max of 183 days in a 365-day period; so, more or less two times 90 days in two consecutive 180-day periods.

      If you entered Peru on May 14, 2022, your 180-day period ends on November 10, 2022. So, the earliest you should return to Peru is November 11, 2022. But as you overstayed and there are no regulations published how this affects the 180-day period, I can’t base my answer on the Peruvian law. Additionally, you have no right to get the full 90 days when you enter Peru. It’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer if he/she lets you enter at all (never heard of anyone ever being denied entry in cases like yours) and how many days he/she is willing to give you.

      With this being said, I think you shouldn’t have a problem returning to Peru mid-November or so and getting another 90 days.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    CH · 04/09/2022
    Hi Eva 

    I just left Peru and thought I would give my experience. 

    I don’t know if immigration officials don’t know the rules or are being more strict but I have had problems both leaving and entering Peru this year as a U.K. citizen. I entered Peru on 28th October 2021 and although I was asked how long I was staying, and replied 88 days, I was only given 30. I left Peru on 17th February 2022 without problems after paying the fine. 

    I returned to Peru on 8th June 2022 and was told by the immigration official that I had used all my days and was then asked lots of questions and asked to show my return ticket. They did give me 90 days after this.

     I left Peru on 3rd September 2022 so 88 days, but after being subjected to many questions by immigration. He actually asked me to come round his desk and look at the computer screen showing my entries, which are just the above plus 2, one week long entries in 2019. I was told by this immigration official that I could not re-enter Peru this year. Though when I insisted  I’d like to return on 20 December he replied “podría ser”. 

    I’m hoping to get a work visa via the creating a company method with the help of a lawyer and gaining residency in Peru. I will try and re-enter Peru on 20 December and see how it goes, but I’m now dreading all of the questions. 

    Btw, immigration does now stamp passports, I received both entry and exit stamps on this trip.

    Greetings 

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/09/2022
      @CH Hello CH,

      Thank you so much for taking the time to write to LimaEasy and share your experience in such detail with us.

      Exactly feedbacks like yours are so valuable not only to keep LimaEasy as up to date as possible but also to help other travelers visiting Peru on a regular basis and make them aware of the one or other strange situation they might encounter.

      You are actually not the first one who only got 30 days without reason and who describes being told by immigration officials that he already used all of the days even though after checking the dates everything seems to be within the allowed time frame and sometimes within the tolerance range. So, I’m not sure what is going on, either the one or other official can’t count, or doesn’t know the regulations, or likes to play power games (it’s always at the discretion of the immigration official how many days you get), or something is afoot.

      Anyway, I just checked your dates. The 2019 dates shouldn’t count anymore. So, you entered the first time on October 28, 2021, adding 90 days which you can stay we are at January 26, 2022; even though you overstayed longer as you just got 30 days, you were in Peru 22 days longer than the max allowed time, usually not a big deal. Your first 180-day period ended on April 26, 2022.

      As Migraciones announced that they count the 180-day periods from the first entry of a visitor, your second 180-day period should have started on April 27, 2022. When you entered on June 6, 2022, you were well in your second 180-day period, got 90 days, stayed less and the second 180-day period should end on October 24, 2022. Then a new 180-period should start, and you are allowed another up to 90 days.

      But it might be as well possible that your second 180-day period only started with the date of your second entry on June 6, 2022. But even then, you stayed less than the 90 days you got when you left on September 3, 2022. The 180-day period ends on December 5, 2022. So, after that you should be fine to re-enter Peru and get another up to 90 days in a new 180-day period.

      So, I really don’t understand the statement of the immigration official.

      And yes, as mentioned above, since May 2022 passports are stamped again.

      I wish you all the best and hope you manage to set up your company and get a work visa to avoid these unpleasant situations.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      CH · 08/09/2022
      @Sunflower Your website is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in travelling to Peru, so it's nice to be able to contribute in some small way. 
      You're right that I was only 22 days over the 90, but I guess that because I technically overstayed 82 days according to the form I was given when I left, this is what has caused me problems. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/09/2022
      @CH Sometimes the ways of Migraciones are inscrutable.

      And thanks again for your praise and your contribution.

      All the best

      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Anastasiia · 08/08/2022
    Hello guys. In the pdf file it says that Ukrainians can stay 90 days ( without any specification of time frames). I left Peru on 2nd of July and overstayed 1 day and had to pay When I can come back to Peru again?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/08/2022
      @Anastasiia Hello Anastasia,

      Even though not specifically mentioned you have up to 90 days in a 180-day period.

      If you left Peru on July 2, overstayed one day and assuming you got 90 days when you entered, you came to Peru on April 2. So, your 180-day period ends on September 29, 2022.

      The earliest you can enter Peru again is on September 30. And then you shouldn’t have a problem getting another 90 days.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Farshad · 08/07/2022
    Hi guys

    I have peru tourist visa which is valid from march 2022 till march 2023, i have been once in peru for two weeks, i want to go back to this country after fee months for few days, is it possible to use the same visa? Is this sth like multi visa? 

    thanks
    Farshad
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/07/2022
      @Farshad Hello Farshad,

      Peruvian consulates issue both, single-entry (entrada simple) and multiple-entry (entrada multiple) tourist visas.

      Which one you have, I don’t know. Probably check the visa in your passport and see if you somewhere find "entrada simple" or "entrada multiple" on it.

      If you have a single-entry tourist visa, you are allowed to enter Peru only one time during its validity, which you have already done. If you want to enter a second time, you have to apply for a new tourist visa.

      If you have a multiple-entry visa, you are allowed to enter and leave Peru multiple times during its validity without having to apply for a new tourist visa each time.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Tunde · 06/07/2022
    Hi
    i Have a question, I’m a Nigerian with a valid visa that will expire on 6th sep 2022. I applied for residency before the expiration of my first 183days and the residency is yet to be issued. I am planning on traveling to Barbados for 4days on the 10th of September  and I do not know if they will allow me back into the country. Your response will be much appreciated 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 06/07/2022
      @Tunde Hello Tunde,

      Did I understand correctly that you are in Peru at the moment on a tourist visa and applied for residency already, but want to travel and your application is still in process?

      If so, you can only leave the country during the processing time of your resident visa application with a special travel permit (Permiso especial de viaje, officially as well called Autorización de estadía fuera del país); if you don't apply for this travel permit before leaving Peru, your resident visa application is null and void.

      You find more information about applying for this special travel permit in our article Travel Permit (Permiso Especial de Viaje / Autorización de Estadía fuera del País - AEP).

      As soon as you have the travel permit, which is only valid for up to 30 days, you can leave Peru without worries and will be allowed to reenter the country with no problems.

      Greetings
      Eva


  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jamie · 12/06/2022
    Hi,
    I am currently trying to use the official migraciones website to complete the F-007 form but I notice that it is blocked out and won’t let you proceed?

    Can any anyone shed some light on why this is?

    Kind Regards,
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/06/2022
      @Jamie Hello Jamie,

      Not sure what you are trying to do, but on the official Migraciones website, all tramites you can apply for with the form F-007 can't be submitted there anymore. You need to apply through the Agencia Digital.

      If you are actually there and can't fill in certain fields, make sure you have filled out previous fields correctly, checked the terms & conditions, etc. Another option why the fields are blocked out is that according to your immigration status you cannot apply for what you are trying to apply.

      Greetings
      Eva


  • This commment is unpublished.
    Michael · 26/05/2022
    Hey everyone,

    I am from the U.S., currently in Peru. I will have a meeting with the migration office in a couple weeks and will try to find some answers here. I have a question for all of you though, where are you reading anything that says US citizens (as an example, but works for all countries listed with a single number under segment "hasta") can only stay 90 days in 180 days?

    If you look at the PDF, it says US nationals have a 90-day length of time to stay on a tourist visa (no actual visa required). Other countries have a "90/180" length under "hasta", like Austria, while Chile has "180/365". 

    Here is what is written at the top of page 2:
    (90/180)El plazo máximo de estadía será de 90 días calendarios en un periodo de 180 días
    (180/365)El plazo máximo de estadía será de 180 días calendarios en un periodo de un año. (90/365)El plazo máximo de estadía será de 90 días calendarios en un periodo de un año.

    This says that wherever it has a "/" mark in-between the two number, people of that nationality can only stay a total cumulative number of days (the first number) in a period of days (the second number), (e.g., a tourist from Austria can travel to Peru visa-free for a period of 90 days in a 180 day period. Said traveler could be in Peru 90 consecutive days and not return for another 90 days, at which point their schedule would re-start, or they could go to Peru for 30-days, leave for 30-days, come back for 30-days, etc. indefinitely). 

    The description of (# of days you can stay / # of days in a period of time) signifies that SOME countries are restricted to only a certain number of days, and are not allow to re-enter the country immediately after (like border hopping). 

    The converse of this implies that any country where the number of days you can stay in Peru as a tourist is listed as a single number, like 90, or 183; border hopping is back in style. Of course it is always at the discretion of the immigration officer to allow you to enter into a country, but a 90-day term implies you can stay up to 90 days without paying a fee (like Daniel D). If you were to leave on day 89, and return the following day, assuming the immigration officer permits you entry, you are starting a new 90 day period. Continue this procedure every 90 days and you could stay forever... unless the immigration officer says "No puedes entrar"....

    Presuming that Peru has starting switching to a [functional] digital record for entry, it's reasonable to guess that if you were to border hop indefinitely, your name could be red-flagged at some point. Immigration officers may be instructed to deny entry to perpetual border-hoppers, or maybe they won't.

    I plan to ask the immigration office:
    1). Can my 90-day entry permission can be extended officially?
    2). What happens if I leave to...say... Bolivia for a weekend before the end of my 90-days, and want to return to Peru? Do I start a new 90-days? Can I do that in another 90-days? (i.e., can I border hop?)


    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/05/2022
      @Michael Hello Michael,

      Interesting argumentation, but I think you are approaching the whole thing from an US American or “western” perspective.

      You are absolutely right. According to the document from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, some nationals can stay up to 90 days, others up to 90 days in a 180-day period. So, you conclude that those nationals which are allowed up to 90 days can just leave after they stayed three months and immediately return and continue to do so for a more or less indefinite time.

      First, the reality on the ground, so either at the land borders or at the airport, at least in Lima, looks different. Those having already spent their 90 days in Peru and trying to return before their 180-day period is over, are usually badly scolded and only given anything between 3 and 30 days. So, the good-old border hopping times - at least for now - aren’t back; quite the contrary; Peru is trying for over 15 years to contain border hopping. You might want to have a look at the section in the article above about border hopping.

      Additionally, you should check out the Peruvian foreigner law, Decreto Legislativo 1350 article 29h. There you find that tourists can stay in Peru for a maximum of 183 days in a 365-day period. So, even if your argumentation were correct, you could only border hop one time and then have to stay outside Peru for at least 6 months. This might be connected among other things to the Peruvian tax laws. If you are longer than half a year in Peru you aren't considered a tourist anymore and, even though not enforced, are liable for taxation on your worldwide income.

      Regarding your Migraciones questions:

      Tourist visa extensions were only possible from May 15, 2018 until March 2020, when the country went into a shutdown due to Covid, and that most probably by accident or technical fault. Before May 2018 and since August 2021, no extensions. I wrote a quite detailed article about the whole situation, so have a look at Tourist Visa extension in Peru.

      Your second question in my opinion cannot be clearly answered. No-one can guarantee you that after staying 90 days in Peru, leaving and trying to return, you get another 90 days. As mentioned above, at least at the Lima airport immigration officers usually only give a few days up to a month so people can get their stuff in order.

      You should be aware that you do not have a right to the full 90 days, not the first time you enter and surely not after you already stayed three months. And as it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer you have to face, even Migraciones can’t give you a 100% answer.

      If you are lucky, no one bothers that you already stayed in Peru before, and you get another 90 days or the immigration officer is doing his/her job by the book, scolds you and only gives you a few days.

      So, I wish you all the best and good luck with Migraciones. Please share the answers you get with us. And when you are already there, really interesting would be to know how they explain the difference between the 90 days and the 90 days in a 180-day period.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Emir · 09/06/2022
      @Michael Michael, any updates on your findings?
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jake · 12/04/2022
    Good afternoon,

    I had a quick question if you don't mind. I am an American citizen who went to Peru from December 11-22, 2021 and then I went back again from December 30-March 2. I planned another two-month trip to Peru a while ago to see my girlfriend from April 29- to June 28. Do you think I will be denied entry for already staying a little over 75 days already? Thank you
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/04/2022
      @Jake Hello Jake,

      no, I don't think that you are denied entry. Personally I know of only 2 cases in over 10 years that weren't allowed to re-enter Peru, and both were overstaying excessively before trying to come back to Peru.

      According to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs you can stay up to 90 days in a 180-day period, so as up to now you only stayed 75 days, in my opinion you should get at least the remaining 15 days when entering the country again.

      However, how many days you get always is at the discretion of the immigration officer you have to face. If you are lucky, he or she will give you another 90 days; if there is someone doing his job by the book, you might only get 15 or 30 days. Nobody can guarantee you have many days you will end up with.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Emir · 09/06/2022
      @Jake What was the outcome of this? How much did they give you?
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Christopher Yates · 01/04/2022
    Can a Thai citizen visit Peru without a visa and if so for how long?
    In the PDF under Turista it says "NO" and under Hosta it says 90.
    Is it 90 every 180 for Thai citizens or what?
    Thanks,

    Chris
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/04/2022
      @Christopher Yates Hello Chris,

      Thai citizens do not have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru. They can travel visa-free to Peru and get a so-called temporary authorization to enter as a tourist upon entry (today this is nothing more than an entry in the immigration database).

      As everyone wishing to enter as a tourist, they need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival, a return or onward ticket, the health declaration, either their Covid vaccination certificate or a negative PCR test, and, if it works, the pre-registration. In case the immigration officer asks questions, which can happen to every foreign national, it might be wise to know the travel plans or have a travel itinerary and have some funds to finance the visit.

      And yes, as most other nationals as well, they can stay up to 90 days in a 180-day period, so 3 months in half a year. Be aware that it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days are given.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    daniel d. · 02/01/2022
    greetins..hola..and a question if can answer as soon as possible.

    on a passport/US entered peru on July 7th, 2021 (with 90 day document). exited on January 1st, 2022 (177 days). migration officer stated to go "caja".

    Paid 190 soles ($48). brought back to migration officer. the migration officer (I did ask/by a letter). I asked if I could exit and come back again. I said "next week". he said "tomorrow, if you want". (english was rather good). 

    thoughts of valid?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/01/2022
      @daniel d. Hello Daniel,

      no, this doesn't sound valid, but we are in Peru ....

      The law clearly states that most nationalities, including US passport holders, can stay in Peru as tourists 90 days in a 180-day period; so, 3 months in Peru, 3 months out of Peru.

      When you entered in July Peru still had an exceptional regulation in place intended for tourists who were stuck in Peru during the lockdown and in times when there were no or only limited flights. This was lifted on August, 20. So your 90 days started in August and you should have left by November 18. You however overstayed and paid the fee for staying 43 days longer than allowed. Your 180-day period, calculated from August 20 only ends on February 16; so by law that's the earliest you can re-enter Peru.

      However, if you return earlier, there are two options: the immigration officer you have to face doesn't bother and just gives you another 90 days; or he/she does his/her job by the book and either denies you to enter Peru (never heard of this happening) or only gives you a few days. From people getting in contact with me here and who are in the same situation as you, I heard that they were given between 7 and 30 days when re-entering Peru before their 180-days period was over.

      So, its a bit of a gamble.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Lesley Richardsoon · 14/10/2021
    I have just looked up the pdf page relating to countries and visas and I notice that Great Britain has no days listed to stay. Not 90 not 180 so what does the blank space mean?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/10/2021
      @Lesley Richardsoon
      Honestly I don't know. In the original pdf published on the official website of the Peruvian government, the spaces for Great Britain are blank as well. The list was first published when the UK was in the process of leaving the EU, so I assume that back then there were no agreements between Peru and UK and therefore the spaces were left blank; and until now nobody updated the list.

      However, as far as I know British nationals can stay up to 90 days in Peru.

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