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What you can & can’t bring into Peru

What you can & can’t bring into Peru

Peruvian Customs Regulations for travelers, foreign residents and Peruvians entering the country

When travelling to a foreign country it’s always a good idea to know which items you can take with no problems, and which ones you better leave at home because restrictions or bans apply in the country of your destination.

For Peru find a quite detailed list of items that you can bring without difficulties or with some restrictions and those that you can’t bring into the country at all below.

Content overview

Please note that below regulations only apply when the items enter the country as accompanied luggage with a traveler (foreigner (tourist), foreign resident or Peruvian) - when shipping items into Peru other regulations are in place, which are shortly described at the end of this list.

Be aware as well that all items you bring into the country tax- and duty-free have to be for personal use or consumption and shouldn’t exceed normal household quantities.

 

Personal items that can be brought into Peru tax- and duty-free

  • Clothes for personal use
  • Suitcases, bags and backpacks containing personal belongings
  • Toiletry for personal use
  • Other personal items and jewelry for personal use
  • Books, magazines, newspapers and documents for personal use
 

Medication, supplements and medical devices that can be brought into Peru tax- and duty-free

  • Medication for personal use only (except medication containing narcotics, which may be restricted or prohibited in Peru)
  • Vitamins and dietary supplements for personal use only
  • Aids and appliances for personal mobilization and medical control (wheelchair, walkers, crutches, blood pressure / glucose meter, nebulizers, thermometer, etc.)
  • Even though medical marijuana was legalized in Peru in 2017, your medical marijuana prescription from another country won’t be accepted in Peru. So, a big no to bringing cannabis leaves, stems and flowers into Peru. A grey area is still cannabis derivatives such as CDB Oil or even Hemp powder, even though both are readily available in Peru and most probably no-one will care when entering the country with small amounts for personal use.
 

Electric and electronic devices incl. accessories that can be brought into Peru tax- and duty-free

  • 2 cellphones (1 cellphone for minors age 7 to 18)
  • 1 laptop
  • 1 tablet or 1 digital organizer
  • 2 conventional or digital cameras
  • 1 video camera or camcorder (portable and not for professional use)
  • 1 radio or audio player/recorder (portable and not for professional use)
  • 1 CD / DVD player (portable)
  • 1 video game device (portable) incl. 10 games
  • 2 external hard disc drives and 4 USB sticks
  • 4 memory cards for the digital camera, video camera / camcorder or video game device brought into the country at the same time
  • 4 USB sticks
  • 10 rolls of film for the camera and 10 cassettes for the video camera / camcorder brought into the country at the same time
  • 20 CDs or DVDs
  • 1 portable calculator
  • 2 electric hair dryers or hair straighteners
  • 1 electric shaver
  • Drones (have to be declared; please read below under "Restricted items")
 

Other items that can be brought into Peru tax- and duty-free

  • 1 (set of) sporting equipment for personal use
  • 1 musical instrument (portable)
  • Other articles for personal use or consumption or gifts with a total value of up to US$500. In case of electric and electronic devices not mentioned above, tools or other personal equipment, only one item each is allowed to bring into Peru tax- and duty-free when the total value won’t exceed US$500.
    • If the value of these items exceeds US$500 or exceed above mentioned allowed quantities, they should be declared. So, the custom declaration form should be filled in and be presented at “aduanas” (customs).
    • If the value is between US$500 and US$ 1,000, a duty of 12% is required to be paid; if the value is above US$ 1,000, the normal import duty for each article applies (foreign residents and Peruvians should know the maximum value of declared items per year is US$3000). As Peruvian customs officers seem to be quite creative when determining the value of an item, best bring receipts with you, which can be presented in case appraised value is in the clouds.
    • If you don’t declare what has to be declared and are caught, be prepared to pay next to the usual duty additionally a fine of 50% of the customs value of the item.
 

Food that can be brought into Peru

The following food items can be brought into Peru without an import permit from Senasa, the Peruvian National Agrarian Health Service, as long as they are in normal household quantities, correctly labeled, unopened and commercially packed or hermetically sealed and aren’t brought from countries with sanitary restrictions.

  • Cooked sausages and other cooked meat products
  • Cooked or cured ham
  • Matured and processed cheese
  • Canned food
  • Pasteurized milk products
  • Processed honey
  • Fresh animal products such as raw meat or fresh cheese as well as most fresh vegetables and fruits are restricted items which must fulfill certain requirements; an export sanitary certificate from the country of origin and a special import permit from Senasa is needed to bring them into the country.
 

Cigarettes and alcohol that can be brought into Peru tax- and duty-free

  • 20 packs of cigarettes (max, 400 cigarettes) or 50 cigars or 250 grams tobacco (for travelers older than 18 years)
  • For shisha (sheesa) tabacco the normal tabacco regulations apply as long as it doesn’t contain cannabis or opium
  • E-cigarettes and e-liquids aren’t considered in the Peruvian legislation, but bringing one or two mods and a bit of liquid (both can be bought in Peru) isn’t a problem
  • 3l of liquor (for travelers older than 18 years) – except any beverage named “Pisco” not produced in Peru, which is prohibited
 

Bringing Money into Peru

  • Amounts of more than US$ 10,000 or the equivalent in any other currency have to be declared when entering or leaving Peru.
  • Entering or leaving the country with amounts over US$ 30,000 or the equivalent in any other currency is forbidden.
  • So, if you carry more than US$ 10,000, download the app "Bienvenido al Perú" available on Android and iOS and follow the instructions. Best have some proof of the origin of the money.
  • If you opt to not declare amounts over US$ 10,000 and are caught, expect to pay a 30% fine on the amount you carry with you, If you are caught with amounts over US$ 30,000 expect that amounts over the US$ 30,000 are confiscated and you are fined 30% on the rest.
 

Bringing Pets into Peru, including requirements

Senasa, the Peruvian National Agrarian Health Service, considers only dogs and cats as pets. Per person, only one pet can be brought into Peru as accompanied luggage (in cabin or as checked baggage), as air cargo or on land.

Peru doesn’t quarantine dogs and cats that meet the following requirements:

  • Certificate of Good Health issued by an official veterinarian in the home country within 14 days before entering Peru
  • Proof of vaccinations against:
    • Rabies for both dogs and cats - vaccinated between 21 days and 12 months prior to entering the country. Peru does not recognize 2- or 3-year rabies vaccines.
    • Additionally, for dogs: vaccination against Parvovirus, Distemper, Hepatitis, and Leptospirosis
    • Additionally, for cats: vaccination against Panleukopenia (FVRCP), Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis and Calicivirus
  • Recent proof of veterinary treatment against internal and external parasites

Above requirements also apply to emotional support and service dogs and cats.

Peru doesn’t require a special import permit for dogs and cats (exception: puppies and kittens less than 12 weeks of age and unvaccinated) nor a pet microchip or rabies titer test to enter the country and doesn’t have a banned breeds list.

Upon arrival at the airport or Peruvian border, pet owners have to proceed with their pet to the Senasa office. Here the pet owner first has to pay two different fees: an examination fee equivalent to 1.973% of 1 UIT = S/ 91 (2022) and a fee for issuing the pet’s permit to enter the country equivalent to 0.729% of 1 UIT = S/ 34 (2022). So about S/ 125.

Then the health certificate, vaccination certificates and parasite treatment certificate are checked and the dog or cat quickly looked over. If the documents and the pet’s health are to the satisfaction of the Senasa inspector, the pet can enter. If the documents aren’t in order or the pet doesn’t seem to be in good health, further examination by a licensed Peruvian veterinarian can be requested at the dog owners’ expense. In the end, the Senasa inspector decides if the animal can enter or needs, for example, a parasite treatment or a vaccination or is quarantined before being allowed to enter or has to be returned to the country of origin.

Other animals that might be considered pets in other countries such as birds, rodents and rabbits, fish, reptiles, etc. need an export sanitary certificate from the country of origin and a special import permit from Senasa. Additional permits are required to bring animals that are under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) into Peru.

Above mentioned recommendations are given to our best knowledge reflecting the current Peruvian regulations. As these sometimes change quickly and without prior notice, we highly recommend checking the veterinary regulations shortly before your travel with the nearest Peruvian consulate and / or Senasa.

 

Restricted and prohibited items when entering Peru

The official list of restricted and prohibited items is long, but most items on it are surely nothing a normal traveler would carry around. So here just a few items that you might consider bringing into the country that are on the list.

Restricted Items

Restricted items need permission to be brought into the country. Depending on the item, it just has to be declared (and paid duty on it) or special requirements have to be fulfilled and a special permit has to be issued.

Restricted items include, but aren’t be limited to:

  • Everything exceeding the amount or value of above items - declare upon arrival and pay duty
  • Everything not intended for personal use - declare upon arrival and pay duty
  • Pets except for 1 dog or 1 cat (see above under Pets), other animals and animals that are under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) - get in contact with the nearest Peruvian consulate and / or Senasa
  • Veterinary products and pet food / animal feed - get in contact with the nearest Peruvian consulate and / or Senasa
  • Plants and plant products - get in contact with the nearest Peruvian consulate and / or Senasa
  • Cultural items such as art objects and archaeological artefacts - get in contact with the nearest Peruvian consulate and / or the Ministry of Culture
  • Weapons and ammunition - get in contact with the nearest Peruvian consulate and / or Sucamec / Discamec
  • Drones 
    • Over the past years, regulations to bring drones into Peru were eased. So today drones under 2 kg of weight for personal recreation and air sports don’t need a special license from MTC, the Ministry of Transport and Communication, anymore.
    • Drones have to be declared upon entry (download the App "Bienvenido al Perú" which is available on iOS and Android, follow the instructions and fill in required fields; once arriving in Peru proceed to customs at your point of entry; see below under "Peruvian Customs Declaration Form / Bienvenido al Perú Customs App") and 18% of the value deposited, which is refunded when leaving Peru.
    • Failing to declare your drone might cause a hefty fine when caught.
    • With this payment, travelers get a temporary operations license and can use the drone during their stay in the country.
    • If the drone is commercially used, a special permit issued by MTC’s Directorate for Civil Aviation (DGCA) is needed.
    • Be aware that flying drones over or near archaeological sites (except you apply for another special permit at the Ministry of Culture or on site), military bases and airports (maintain at least 4 km distance) is prohibited.
    • Without yet another special permit, the drone is prohibited from throwing or dropping any objects.
    • Keep your distance as well from roads, train tracks, persons and buildings.

Prohibited Items

Then there are items you just aren’t allowed to bring into the country. If you are caught with them, they will be seized and you may be fined or worse.

These include, but aren't limited to:

  • Drugs, narcotics and medication containing narcotics
  • Fireworks
  • Used clothes and shoes due to amount and value not considered for personal use
  • Any beverage named “Pisco” not produced in Peru
  • Used car spare parts
  • Some pesticides and other chemicals
 

Peruvian Customs Declaration Form / Bienvenido al Perú Customs App

Since June 2022, the good old customs declaration form has served its time and was replaced by the App "Bienvenido al Perú" which is available on iOS and Android. It details in short the most important regulations in English and Spanish and gives you the option to declare items or money.

For the time being, we leave the old custom declaration form and currency declaration form in the attachments below, as they show more clearly which items have or haven’t to be declared. Be aware that it's up to you to inform yourself and then do the right thing:

  • If you have nothing to declare, you don’t have to do anything. Clear immigration. If you arrive at the airport, get your luggage and then just proceed to the exit.
  • If you have something to declare, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once you arrive in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at the point of entry.
  • If you carry more than US$ 10,000, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once you arrive in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at the point of entry.

Please be aware that failing to declare taxable or dutiable items results in fines of 50% of the customs value of the items if caught; failing to declare currency over US$ 10,000 results in a 30% fine on the amount you carry with you.

Note: Above regulations only apply for items brought into the country as accompanied luggage. For items send to Peru via the normal postal service (Serpost) or a courier service, other regulations apply. These prohibit, for example, importing new and used clothes and shoes as well as medication and vitamins. On electric and electronic devices and many other items exceeding the duty-free US$100 that anyone can receive, hefty duties have to be paid.

Attachments

  • File Description
    File Size
    File Type
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  • Customs declaration form
    32 KB
    418
  • Currency declaration form
    15 KB
    82
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  • This commment is unpublished.
    ROBERT HASTY · 15/09/2022
    AM I ALLOWED TO BUY A REPLICA JAPANESE SWORD, WEIGHING 3 TO 4 POUNDS. HAVE IT IN OUR HOME IN LIMA AS A DECORATION ON MY WALL. IT IS FOR WALL MOUNTING ONLY. NOTHING ELSE. COST WAS VERY LOW, IF I BUY ONE. $ 24.00. I AM ALSO A SENIOR CITIZEN. 87 YEARS OLD. ANY CUSTOMS FEES? THANK YOU. SINCERELY,
     ROBERT A.  HASTY
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 15/09/2022
      @ROBERT HASTY Hello Robert,

      Yes, you can, of course, buy a katana and yes, you can hang it on your wall.

      However, if you buy it abroad, so outside Peru, the question is, how the sword comes to Peru.

      The easiest and fuss-free option is to either have it in your luggage when returning to Peru after a holiday abroad or have someone (family visiting, friends, a nice person) bring it with him / her when coming to Peru. No problems, no fees, no taxes, no customs, nothing.

      If you ship the katana from abroad to Peru, costs and fees depend on the service you use. Usually, if it’s shipped with the normal postal service and the price is only US$ 25 no fees have to be paid. But the package might take a while to reach you and you might have to pick it up at a special post office in Lima. Best have it send as registered mail as you get a tracking number and can regularly check where your package is.

      If you ship with a courier service such as UPS, DHL, Fedex, etc. you might end up having to pay a clearing agent, some random fees or duties which by far exceed the value of your katana. I can only recommend not using a courier service. It’s a nightmare.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    ROBERT HASTY · 13/09/2022
    We live in San Borja. I would like to buy a Japonese katana for display purposes only, it will hang on my office wall at home and will not be used as any kind of weapon. Thank you.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 13/09/2022
      @ROBERT HASTY Hello Robert,

      Honestly, I don’t understand your question and how I can help.

      Do you want to buy a Katana in Lima? Or as you are writing here on the What you can and can’t bring article, do you want to bring one with you or have it shipped to Peru?

      Finding an original piece in Lima might be difficult and right now I don’t know of any shop that might sell these types of Japanese products. But, on Mercado Libre and Ebay a few Katanas are offered. If you are looking for something more original, you could try contacting the Asociación Peruana Japonese (APJ) in Jesus Maria. Probably there someone knows where to buy a Japanese sword in Lima. Or contact one of the many Japanese shops; while they mainly sell Japanese foods and typical other Japanese products, you might be lucky and the one reading your message can help.

      In case you want to bring a Katana with you when flying into Peru, you shouldn’t have a problem. Airlines allow them in the checked luggage and as far as I know, if the value doesn’t exceed US$ 300 (probably even US$ 500) you can bring them into the country duty-free.

      I really don’t know how the requirements are if you ship a Katana into Peru. Probably best check with the seller and postal service or shipping company to avoid astronomical fees, duties and nerve-wracking delays.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Axel · 12/09/2022
    Hello can I travel to Peru with a hookah ? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/09/2022
      @Axel Hello Axel,

      Hookahs aren’t mentioned in the Peruvian regulations, but I think you shouldn’t have a problem bringing one with you. Personally, I would worry more about getting the equipment to Peru without breaking it.

      If you decide to let your pipe at home, there are quite a few shisha bars / lounges at least in Lima.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Claif Rebaza · 11/09/2022
    I’m planing to bring my fishing gear like reel and pole please let me know I really need help with this 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 11/09/2022
      @Claif Rebaza Hello Claif,

      You can bring your fishing equipment with you with no problem as long as it’s for recreational / sport fishing, in normal quantities a tourist would carry and not intended for sale in Peru.

      While generally speaking, no special license is necessary to fish in Peru, in some areas there are restrictions in place where and what species you are allowed to fish. So, it’s highly recommended to either get in contact with local authorities or fish only with local recreational / sport anglers or use sport fishing charters.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Samantha Broad · 01/09/2022
    Hi, I would appreciate some help please. 
    Am I able to bring dried fruit and nuts in my hand luggage to Peru? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 01/09/2022
      @Samantha Broad Hello Samantha,

      you won't have a problem with bringing dried fruits and nuts into Peru if they are in usual household quantities and correctly labeled, unopened and commercially packed or hermetically sealed.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Peter Max · 04/08/2022
    Hi, Appreciate your help.
    I been trying to find information about what are prohibited items when leaving Peru.
    1. Can I carry little bit of gold and jewelries in hand laguage?
    2. If i can carry gold what's the threshold limit for hand laguage?
    2. Gifts made of animal and plant parts (ex. feathers? )

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/08/2022
      @Peter Max Hello Peter,

      Not sure what you mean by a “little bit of gold and jewelries”. While you surely can buy gold and beautiful artisan (gold) jewelry in Peru and leave the country with it if it’s for personal use and in usual “household quantities”, bringing gold and gold products out of the country is a sensitive topic. Trying to reduce illegal gold mining and illegal gold trade, regulations are quite strict and you will find special equipment in all major airports detecting those products.

      So, if you buy gold items, make sure to only purchase them legally and get an official receipt. I don’t know the threshold limit. If you are already in Peru, best ask at Sunat/Aduanas, if you are abroad, get in contact with the Peruvian consulate who should be able to clarify the regulations in Peru properly.

      For products made of animals and plants it depends which animal and plants. It’s prohibited to bring protected, endangered and extinction threatened animals and plants, or products made of parts of these out of the country. However, if you, for example, buy typical souvenirs, you shouldn’t have a problem. I left Peru with all sorts of Alpaca and Vicuña products, souvenirs made of huayruro seeds and other plants parts and jewelry made with pearls, feathers and even bones and had no problem.

      And before going on a shopping spree in Peru, make sure that you can bring those products back to your home country.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jose · 30/07/2022
    Hi, Appreciate your help! I have 3 questions: 
    1. do customs agents at the airport enforce homologation regulations on passenger's items? I'll bring a gaming wifi router. The wi-fi router is not on the list yet, I see some comments online saying I have to declare with the "MTC" besides customs for an additional $30 fee, but those people import through regular mail.
    2. If besides that router I also bring two small used kitchen appliances (vacuum and heater) as gifts do I have to declare them if the value is within $500
    3. if my 3 items are used and I have to pay tax, do agents charge me tax as if they were new or used?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 31/07/2022
      @Jose Hello Jose,

      Answer to your first question

      Routers aren’t on the list, because usually travelers don’t need them for their trip to Peru. Anyway, routers belong to the “restricted items” and to bring them into Peru (be it commercially or for private use) you need a special permit (Permiso de internamiento) issued by the Peruvian Ministry of Transport and Communications (Ministerio de Transporte y Communicaciones - MTC) who checks if the device complies with the current Peruvian telecommunications legislation.

      So, if you want to go the legally correct way, you don’t just have to declare the router, but have to apply for the above mentioned permit for which you at least need the brand, model and technical data sheet. If the device is already approved in Peru, you usually get the permit within a week or so, but as you are a non-resident foreigner and abroad, there might be some hurdles to overcome. In case the router you want to bring isn’t already approved in Peru or belongs to a certain device category, you might have to get an approval certificate issued by another authority in Peru first and only then can apply for the MTC permit.

      All in all, going the official way takes time and might become a nightmare. And be aware that if you put the router in your customs declaration form, you have to make a stop at the customs counters at the airport and then will have to present the MTC permit. So, most people don’t declare items like this and usually slip through.

      Answer to your second question

      The problem is that the total value of all “gifts” (in your case that would be the router, a vacuum, and a heater) can’t exceed US$ 500. If the value is below US$ 500, you don’t have to declare them, if the value is over US$ 500 you are supposed to declare all (!) “gifts”, which in case of the router means you need the MTC permit.

      Answer to your third question

      As described in the article above, Peruvian customs agents are sometimes quite creative when determining the value of an item. No matter if new or used, they often check the value of an item online (so the value of an item in Peru) and then calculate the resulting fees. So, best have original receipts or screenshots of used items including prices in case you decide to declare your "gifts".

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    George · 26/07/2022
    Hello i want to bring a machete in my checked baggage as gift for my father from Iquitos. I fly from Iquitos to lima and then from Lima to Amsterdam. Is that ok??
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/07/2022
      @George Hello George,

      As far as I know, generally you are only prohibited from traveling with sharp objects (including a machete) in your carry-on baggage; but if the machete is properly and securely packed / wrapped, it can be transported in the checked baggage.

      However, to avoid any problems and get a 100% accurate answer, I recommend getting in contact with the airlines and asking them. Additionally, not knowing what kind of machete you are planning to purchase, there might be restrictions / duty to pay or similar bringing it into the EU.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Heather · 17/07/2022
    Can you bring hydrocodone medication prescribed by a doctor in the original prescription bottle? Also, can I bring food that is prepackaged and sealed. I have food allergies and need to travel with my own food. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/07/2022
      @Heather Hello Heather,

      Hydrocodone isn’t on the list of banned medications in Peru; it’s, however, only available in Peru with a special doctor’s prescription.

      So, yes, you can bring it into Peru, but only if it’s for personal use and only the amount necessary as prescribed. Even though usually no-one is interested in your medication, best have your prescription with you and the pills in the original bottle.

      Not sure, how long you want to stay in Peru and about how much food we are talking. Usually, yes, you can bring many foods into Peru without a problem. However, it must be in normal household quantities, correctly labeled, unopened, and commercially packed or hermetically sealed. Some products, such as fresh meat, fresh cheese, fresh fruits and veggies, need a special permit. More info above under “Food that can be brought into Peru”.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    anthony · 04/07/2022
    I have a collection of Diecast military models, airplanes, ships and armor, they are out of box and cannot be resold as new, what will Peruvian import agents deem the duty fee?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/07/2022
      @anthony Hello Anthony,

      Quite frankly, I don’t know. But I think it depends on many factors if you have to pay duty, taxes or other fees and how much on your collection or not.

      So, are you a resident of Peru or coming / being in Peru on a tourist visa? How large is your collection? Might it be accepted as “normal household quantities”? What’s the value? Are you bringing it with you in your luggage or shipping it into Peru with the normal postal service or a courier service (don’t do it)? Is the collection part of other household items you are officially importing as allowed as new resident? …

      Depending on your replies to above answers, you may not have to pay anything, or you may be charged import duty, Peruvian sales tax (16%) and other fees (for example for a customs agent, storage until clearance, some strange taxes, etc.).

      I tried to find the correct code for importing diecast models on the website of Sunat, Peru’s National Customs and Tax Administration Superintendence. For commercial importation of new products, it should be 95.03. I know these parameters don’t apply to your collection, but as I couldn’t find any category for collection items or used models or something similar, I think in the worst-case scenario, this should be the highest you could be charged. 6% ad valorem tax, 2% municipal promotion tax, 16% general sales tax, and 2.75% insurance.

      Sorry, for not be more helpful. Probably, to get an accurate answer, best get in contact with Sunat. If you are not in Peru yet, you can send them a mail here or have a chat here (both usually only in Spanish)

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mike · 28/06/2022
    Hello, where do I declare that I would be bringing a drone and where would I get my money back when leaving the country?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/06/2022
      @Mike Hello Mike,

      download the new App "Bienvenido al Perú" which is available on iOS and Android and fill in required fields. Once you arrive at the airport, proceed to the customs counters (after the luggage claim and before the exit). There they tell you exactly the amount you have to deposit and give you the necessary paperwork.

      Honestly, I don't know where you get your deposit back. Best ask at customs how it works.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jamie · 08/05/2022
    Hello,
    do you know if I can bring in the following:
    -A powerbank
    -Some packaged dehydrated meals
    -Some food seasoning mixes (like powdered curry packs) 

    Thanks in advance. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/05/2022
      @Jamie Hello Jamie,

      You can bring a powerbank, no problem. The same applies to mentioned food items. Just make sure they are in normal household quantities, correctly labeled, unopened and commercially packed or hermetically sealed.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    J · 25/04/2022
    Hello,
    Thanks for the guide? Do you know if I can bring chocolate, Saccharomyces Boulardii (a probiotic for upset stomach when travelling) and antihistamines are allowed?


    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 25/04/2022
      @J Hello J,

      yes, if you bring these items in household quantities, no problem.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    John · 01/04/2022
    Any one know if is ok to bring plant seed into lima?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 01/04/2022
      @John Hello John,

      no matter if private or commercial, officially you need a permit, the so called Permiso Fitosanitario de Importación (PFI), to bring plant products including seeds into the country. The permit is issued by Senasa. Be aware that getting the permit might be quite a mission, and a pest risk analysis might be required. Not worth it, if you just want to bring a few seed packets with you.

      However, a few years back I brought five or six commercially sealed seed packets with me flying into Lima and no-one bothered even when my luggage was checked by customs. I even had sent seed packets with the normal postal service to me in Lima and never had a problem. So, if you just want to bring a few and they are commercially sealed, it might be worth to try. The worst that can happen is that they are confiscated.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      John · 01/04/2022
      @Sunflower Thank you eva ...this case i just mail it to my cousin there.... 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      John · 01/04/2022
      @Sunflower Thank you 
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Kyle · 05/03/2022
    It says only 1 laptop but it’s doesn’t say anything about other computers. What if I want to bring a laptop and a Mac mini?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 05/03/2022
      @Kyle Hello Kyle,

      Usually, people don’t travel with computers but use a laptop or tablet during their journey. According to Peruvian customs, you can bring 1 laptop and 1 tablet or 1 digital organizer with you duty free; nowhere are computers mentioned.

      If you want to bring a laptop and a computer, you have two choices: do the officially correct thing, proceed to the custom counters and declare the computer (best have the original invoice as you most probably will be asked to pay duty) or try your luck and hope no-one will notice and/ or bother which might be the case with a minicomputer .

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Kyle · 05/03/2022
      @Sunflower Thanks for your reply, Eva. I was thinking the same. I appreciate your help. 

      Kyle
    • This commment is unpublished.
      J · 25/04/2022
      @Kyle How did you get on with this Kyle? I am thinking of bringing my work mini PC and an old worthless monitor with me, I don’t see why this can be taxed as it all makes up one computer (much like a laptop). 

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