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Peruvian Tourist Visa

Peruvian Tourist Visa

A Guide to Peruvian Visas

Part 1

When planning a trip to Peru, eventually bureaucratic and visa related matters come to mind. As finding detailed and up-to-date information on this topic can be challenging, we put together comprehensive information and advice on all Peruvian tourist visa issues that might pop up.

 

Content overview

 

Peruvian tourist visa in a nutshell

  • Nationals of some countries need a tourist visa and have to apply for it at a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru; see PDF under attachments at the end of this really long article to find out if you have to apply for a tourist visa.
  • Nationals of other countries can travel visa-free to Peru and receive a "temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist for a certain time" (sounds fancy but since the end of May 2023 it's nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database) at the Peruvian border or airport upon entry.
  • Most nationalities that can travel visa-free to Peru are allowed to stay up to 90 days in a 180-day period for touristic, recreational or health purposes (see attached PDF at the end of this really long article to find out if you can enter Peru visa-free and how long you can stay).
  • Peruvian tourist visas issued at a consulate can be single entry or multiple entry visas; The "temporary authorizations" for those who can travel to peru visa-free are single entry.
  • All visitors coming to Peru need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival.
  • As in nearly all countries around the globe, foreigners are not allowed to work in Peru or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru while being in the country on a tourist visa / temporary authorization to enter as a tourist.
  • Tourists can only sign legally binding documents (work contract, sworn statement needed, for example, for changing your immigration status, car or apartment purchase, marriage license, ...) with a so called "Permiso para firmar contratos".
  • Extensions of tourist visas / authorizations to enter as a tourist are not possible anymore
 

Do I need a visa to enter Peru as a tourist?

Peru is a very welcoming country that signed agreements with many countries, allowing the citizens to travel visa-free to Peru for tourism. Citizens of below mentioned countries do not have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian embassy or consulate before coming to the county. They only need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival to get a “temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist for a certain time” (sounds great, but today is just an entry in the Migraciones database) directly at the immigration control at the airport or border. For a more detailed listing, please have a look at our PDF "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article for clarification.This PDF is an English translation of the original from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which can be found here.

Following nationals do not need a tourist visa for Peru

  • South America: Citizens of all South American countries except Venezuela
  • Central America: Citizens of most Central American countries (exception Cuba, El Salvador, Haiti and Nicaragua)
  • North America: Citizens of the United States, Canada and Mexico
  • Europe: Citizens of all countries within the European Union and Switzerland and UK
  • Africa: Citizens of South Africa
  • Asia: Citizens of Brunei, Indonesia, Israel, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand as well as some citizens of China and India (according to a supreme decree from September 2016 Chinese citizens and according to a supreme decree from March 2017 Indian citizens with a permanent (!) residence visa or a visa with a validity of at least (!) 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia can travel to Peru visa-free; other Chinese and Indian nationals still have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian embassy or consulate!)
  • Oceania: Citizens of Australia and New Zealand
 

How and where to apply for a Peruvian tourist visa

As already mentioned above, citizens of some countries need a visa even for touristic and recreational purposes (please have a look at our PDF "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article for clarification.). As Peru doesn’t offer online visa applications, these nationals have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian diplomatic mission that has jurisdiction over their domicile or country of residence.

Requirements for the tourist visa application at a Peruvian Consulate

Required documents to apply for a tourist visa include, but may not be restricted to:

  • Application form
  • Valid passport
  • Round-trip ticket
  • Hotel reservation, tourist package reservation or invitation letter
  • Proof of sufficient funds
  • Passport photos
  • Proof of legal residency in the area or country under the consulates jurisdiction
  • Receipt for paid application fee

Please be aware that the consulate, where you apply, will invite you to a personal interview.

On the website of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) you find a world map showing all Peruvian consulates abroad. Just click on a marker and the address, phone number, e-mail and - if available - website of the consulate appears.

There is no Peruvian embassy or consulate in my country. Where do I apply?

Especially in Africa and Asia, where the residents of most countries still have to apply for a tourist visa, Peruvian consulates are scarce, website aren’t up-to-date and e-mails often aren't answered. So, finding the correct consulate, getting information and applying for the visa can be quite a challenge. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs unfortunately doesn't consistently publish which consulates have jurisdiction over which regions/countries. Therefore, if there is no Peruvian consulate in your country of residence, the only way to find out where and how to apply for a visa is by getting in contact with the nearest Peruvian diplomatic mission (which sometimes isn’t near at all) and ask if they are in charge or know who is.

 

How long can I stay in Peru as a tourist?

In March 2017, a new Peruvian Foreigner Law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) went into effect, allowing tourists who can travel visa-free to Peru for touristic, recreational or health purposes to stay for a maximum of 183 days within a 365-day period. Shortly afterwards, the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs excluded Schengen States nationals from this general rule, allowing them to stay for up to 90 days within a 180-day period. Then, in June 2019, a new publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) eliminated the general 183 days in a 365-day period for most nationalities, who can travel to Peru visa-free, and divided it into two times 90 days in two consecutive 180-day period.

While the new Peruvian Foreigner Law (Decreto Legislativo 1582), which was published in November 2023, confirms that foreign nationals can stay as tourists in Peru for a maximum of 183 days in a 365-day period, the RREE publication is still in place.

So, today, most nationalities who don’t have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru are given up to 90 days in a 180-day period upon entry; the 180-day period isn't per half year from January to June or July to December but calculated from your first entry.

Brazilian, Chilean, and Mexican nationals as well as those Chinese and Indian passport holders with a permanent residency or a visa with a validity of at least 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia, who are still allowed visa-free up to 180 days should know that Peruvian immigration often only gives them 90 days as well upon entry.

In case you have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru, it’s up to the consulate to decide the number of days you can visit the country. Be aware that even if the consulate issued a 180-day tourist visa, often immigration officers only give you 90 days when you enter.

While you generally can expect to get the full days allowed (if you haven’t overstayed your welcome before excessively or if you haven’t been in Peru before and now try to re-enter the country before your 180-day period is over), you should be aware that you aren't entitled to getting the full 90 (or 180) days. As everywhere around the globe, it’s at the discretion of the immigration officer if he or she lets you enter at all and how many days you are allowed to stay.

Please see our PDF " Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article to find out if you need a visa to enter Peru or if you can travel visa-free and how long you can stay - this PDF is an English translation of the original from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which can be found here.

 

Entering Peru

With the introduction of the new Immigration Law in 2017 and progressive digitalization, especially during Covid times, entering Peru today is a quite easy, seemingly organized and at least for now quick process.

Requirements

After a complete shutdown, Peru re-opened the country for international air travel in October 2020. Land borders only re-opened in mid-February 2022.

Finally, on November 1, 2022, the State of Emergency in Peru was lifted and all Covid entry requirements as well as all other regulations and restrictions that were in place to avoid the spreading of Covid were repealed.

So, entering Peru is back to "normal" and you just need your passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival and, if you have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru, your visa stamp.

Entry process

After leaving the plane (or at the border), just follow the flow to the immigration control; note: at the beginning of 2023, automated passport control machines were finally put into operations, but for the moment are reserved for Peruvian passport holders.

At immigration control just present your passport (which should have at least 2 free pages in the visa section and must be valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival).

While during the height of the Corona pandemic Peru eliminated the stamping of passports when entering the country, in May 2022 the entry stamp was re-introduced just to eliminate it again at the end of May 2023 for those entering Peru on international flights; and, unfortunately, this time it seems for good.

Today, your entry and the number of days you got is just automatically registered and nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database. Now tourist once again don't have anything in writing on how long they are allowed to stay as a tourist.

So, to find out how long you can be in Peru as a tourist, you must ask the immigration officer and, if you want to have a confirmation "in writing" or need proof when you entered or left the country, you have to check online. Our article "How many days did I get when entering Peru?" explains how it's done

While during the height of the Corona pandemic Peru eliminated the stamping of passports when entering the country, in May 2022 the entry stamp was...

Once you are finished at the immigration counter, proceed to the baggage carousel and claim your luggage.

Clearing customs

Since June 2022, the good old customs declaration form has served its time and was replaced by the App "Bienvenido al Perú" which is available on iOS and Android and in short details which items have or haven’t to be declared. So, if you have something to declare, download the App, fill in required fields and once in Peru proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.

Peruvian customs urges travelers to know and comply with Peruvian customs regulations. So, it's up to you to inform yourself. Our article “What you can & can’t bring into Peru” helps with this.

When travelling to a foreign country it’s always a good idea to know which items you can bring with no problems, and which ones you better leave at...

  • If you have nothing to declare, you don’t have to do anything. Clear immigration, get your luggage and proceed to the exit.
  • If you have something to declare, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.
  • If you carry more than US$ 10,000, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.

We highly recommend to be honest, as failing to declare taxable or dutiable items can result in fines of 50% of the custom value of the items if caught; failing to declare currency over US$ 10,000 results in a 30% fine on the amount you carry with you.

Before you can leave the airport, you and your luggage are scanned and you might be asked to follow an official for a thorough check of your luggage.

You made it! Welcome to Peru!

 

How many days did I get?

After not stamping passports during peak Corona times, in May 2022, tourists entering the country finally got an entry stamp again, making it easy to check how long they could stay in Peru.

Peruvian entry stamp
Peruvian entry stamp 2022

Unfortunately, at the end of May 2023 Peru eliminated the entry stamp again for those entering Peru on international flights.

So now, the only way to find out how many days you are allowed to stay as a tourist in Peru, is to ask the immigration officer or, if you prefer a written confirmation check online. Our article “How many days did I get when entering Peru?” explains in detail the legal background and gives you options to check the number of days you are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist.

While during the height of the Corona pandemic Peru eliminated the stamping of passports when entering the country, in May 2022 the entry stamp was...

 

Extension of a Peruvian tourist visa

For the past two decades, every few years the regulations in Peru would change, determining if foreigners can extend their stay as a tourist in the country or not.

Since August 2021, foreign tourists couldn't extend their time in Peru anymore.

However, this general “no” for tourist visa extensions was softened with the implementation of new Migraciones administrative regulations on October 22, 2023, which allow foreign nationals from member countries of the Andean Community, and only these (!), to extend their stay as a tourist again and abolished with the new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582 on November 14, 2023.

The new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582, published on November 14, 2023, states that foreign tourists can stay in Peru for 183 accumulated days in a 365-day period; so, half a year within one year. It further describes that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days, an extension can be granted until the 183 days are reached, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

At the moment (February 7, 2024), the administrative regulations, called TUPA, necessary for the implementation of the new Foreigner Law still haven't been published. So, we don't know, which foreign nationals can extend (exception: Bolivians, Ecuadorians and Colombians, who at the moment are the only ones, who can extend) or for which nationalities there might be restrictions or when foreigners might be able to extend or how it works. So, right now we have to wait for more official news.

You can find detailed background information on the topic in our article "Tourist Visa extension in Peru".

For the past two decades, every few years the regulations in Peru would change, determining if foreigners can extend their stay as a tourist in the...

 

Expired Peruvian tourist visa

Like in any other country, we recommend respecting the rules and regulations here in Peru, including the time you are allowed to stay in the country as a tourist.

However, if you overstayed your stay as a tourist a few days, weeks or even months - at least for now - you rarely have to fear extreme consequences. When leaving Peru you just have to pay a fine of 0.1% of an UIT (S/ 5.15 in 2024) per day you overstayed. The fee must be paid before leaving the country. In our article "Peruvian Overstay fine for tourists" we explain the details

Tourists who stayed longer than the number of days they were given when they entered Peru must pay a fine when leaving the country. While this usua...

Once the fine is paid, you can usually leave Peru with no reprisals.

Those having excessively overstayed their welcome (we are talking about many months or even years), however, might be additionally sanctioned with a re-entry ban for a certain time.

 

Border-hopping Peru

Between 2008 and 2017, border hopping was an easy and popular way to “renew” your tourist visa. Back then, the Peruvian foreigner law stated that visitors can enter Peru for touristic, recreational, or health purposes for 183 days. It however didn't mention if the 183 days were per year or per visit. So, many foreigners used this little gap in the old Peruvian immigration law to live in the country on a tourist visa. As soon as their visa was about to expire, they just crossed the border, stayed 5 minutes, a day or two, in one of Peru’s neighboring countries and returned asking immigrations for another 183 days. For years, this worked absolutely fine.

After the introduction of the new foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) in 2017 which rectified the loophole and the reduction of the time most nationalities can stay visa-free in Peru two years later, Peruvian border officials got stricter and increasingly applied the new rules giving foreigners only the back then allowed 90 or 183 days in a 180 days or 365 days period and didn’t let border-hoppers re-enter (or only for a few days) when they already stayed the maximum allowed time as visitor in the country.

Then in March 2020, Covid hit the country, borders were closed and Migraciones worked hard on digitalizing certain processes and procedures. Now, all entries and exits are saved in the Migraciones database and can be retrieved at all control points.

Since August 2021, travelers, who already stayed their allowed 90 days in a 180-day period, reported that when trying to re-enter the country at Lima’s airport before their 180-day period was over, that they were scolded and only given anything between 3 and 30 days. And according to reports from travelers who tried to re-enter Peru at a land border after already having stayed their 90 days, immigrations often only gave a few days up to a month. Others reported that they still got the full 90 days, however only if they haven't already stayed the max of 183 days in a year.

So, be aware that it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer and his/her evaluation of your situation how long you are allowed to stay in Peru.

One way or the other, the times of border-hopping seem to be over and foreigners wanting to stay longer in Peru should work on getting a "real" temporary visa (for example, a temporary work visa or a temporary student visa) or a residence visa. Our Visa Guide explains the most common temporary and residence visas including the legal background, requirements, necessary preparation work and a step-by-step application guide.

 

Do I need a return ticket when travelling to Peru?

Peruvian law requires that foreign visitors need a return or onward passage out of the country if they aren't residents, proving that they leave the country when the visa or temporary authorization to enter expires. But the law doesn't state that this return or onward passage must be an airline ticket; it could be anything proving that you leave Peru when the time comes.

When entering the country, Peruvian immigration officials hardly ever ask to see this proof. The ones executing above regulations are usually the airlines. As they could be held responsible and have to fly you back, if denied entry to Peru, most airlines require a return or onward flight ticket to even let you check-in to your flight to Peru.

So, if you plan to come to Peru on a one-way ticket, it’s best to check the requirements of your carrier. Some insist on a flight ticket showing that you leave the country, others accept a reservation for a return flight, a few are happy with a bus ticket and there are as well airlines that let you fly with just a one-way ticket.

If your airline requests a return or onward ticket, you could always make a reservation for one, print the confirmation, and then depending on the agency, you either don't pay it and let it expire or cancel it within a certain time. Other options include buying a fully refundable ticket or, more affordable, "renting" a ticket.

 

Can I work in Peru when on a tourist visa?

No!

A Peruvian tourist visa / temporary authorization for tourists allows entry for touristic, recreational, or health purposes only. Even though there are quite a few foreigners working in Peru for a Peruvian company on a tourist visa, Peruvian law explicitly prohibits to work in Peru for a Peruvian company or to receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru while visiting the country as a tourist.

 

Can I study or do an internship in Peru on a tourist visa?

Generally no, sometimes yes.

For more information, please have a look at our detailed article "Peruvian Student Visa".

Peruvian Student Visa

Peruvian Visa Types
Foreigners planning to study at a Peruvian educational institution or to do an internship / apprenticeship (without payment!) at a Peruvian company...

 

Can I sign legally binding documents in Peru when on a tourist visa?

No!

Before signing a legally binding document (work contract, sworn statements, car or apartment purchase, marriage license, ...) tourists have to apply for a so called "Permiso para firmar contratos". Our article "Permit to sign contracts" explains in detail how it works and what you have to do.

If foreign visitors, who are in Peru as a tourist, or temporary visa holders who haven't applied for a CTM, need to sign a legally binding document...

 

Can I volunteer in Peru when on a tourist visa?

Officially, no! But in reality, it's done all the time. Find more information in our article "Peruvian Volunteer Visa".

While Peru has a volunteer visa, the so-called “visa cooperante” (cooperation visa), getting one is such a bureaucratic mess and in most cases not ...

 

!!! As visa and entry regulations can change quickly without prior notice, we highly recommend confirming current visa requirements with the nearest Peruvian embassy or consulate !!!

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  • This commment is unpublished.
    Madi · 07/06/2023
    Hello, 

    I would like some clarification on the recent article concerning the days you're allowed to stay in Peru on a tourist visa. At the beginning of the year, the law stated you're allowed 180 days per year in Peru. I entered Peru on January 07th, 2023 and left on March 26th for Brazil. I returned to Peru two weeks after. However, when I returned to Peru, the immigration officer said the law changed to only 90 days per year, therefore, the officer only give me the remaining days I had left out of the 90 days. But, 2 weeks after I saw the law changed again, (LEY # 31731, April, 27th, 2023) where you are allowed 180 days per year. My question is, do I have to pay the overstay fee or will it be waived because I did not stay over 180 days? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 07/06/2023
      @Madi Hello Madi,

      There have been rumors, especially on social media, for at least a year now that foreigners who can travel to Peru visa-free “according to some new law” or "according to some immigration officer" are only allowed to stay as a tourist for up to 90 days per year. At least until now I couldn’t find anything official in writing; no new law, no new regulation or no change of current laws, regulations and publications that stipulate this.

      So, I was happy that someone, you, finally mentioned the “new law” with a number.

      But are you sure it’s Ley 31731 from April 27, 2023? Have you read the law? Honestly, I never heard of it before, and checked Peru’s official gazette, El Peruano, for it. Yes, there is a Ley 31731 published on April 27, 2023, but it surely has nothing to do with how long tourists can stay in Peru. The law allows the expropriation of the property with code Nº 05_UC_271005 for the execution of the Acai-Bella Union II, stage project construction of the Iruro Dam. (see screenshot attached below).

      With this being said, even though I try to stay as up-to-date as possible, but still might have missed something, I don’t know of any changes regarding the number of days foreigners are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist.

      Decreto Legislativo 1350 (Peru’s foreigner law) states that in general foreigners can stay a max (!!!) of 183 days per year. A publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs shows which nationalities must apply for a tourist visa and which don’t and how long they can stay in Peru. Most nationalities who can travel to Peru visa-free are still welcome for up to (!!!) 90 days in a 180-day period.

      However, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days you are allowed to stay in the country. You are not entitled to get the full 90 days per half year or the full 183 days per year.

      And to answer your question: the “supreme authority” is the immigration officer, no matter the maximum allowed days a foreigner can stay as a tourist according to the law. So, if he/she only gave you, for example, 10 days, then you only can stay 10 days. If you don´t leave after these 10 days, yes, you have to pay the overstay fine for each day you stayed longer. In 2023, the fine is S/ 4.95 per day you overstayed.

      Greetings
      Eva

      Edit: I just had another idea: Did you probably mean Ley 31732 , the amnistia de multa a las personas extranjeras? This law does not apply to tourists only to foreigners residing in Peru who didn't, for example, extend their residence visa in time. (see second screenshot). Tourist who overstayed still have to pay the overstay fine.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Madi · 08/06/2023
      @Sunflower Hey Eva, thank you so much for your response. 
      This brings a lot of clarity to the situation. 

      I would like to find out the process of paying the overstay fine at the airport. 
      Is the counter open 24/7 for international flights that are leaving early morning and late at night. 
      What is the best form of payment that is applicable? 
      If it's cash should it be US or Soles? Also should we have the exact amount of cash or do they give change? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/06/2023
      @Madi
      Hello Madi,

      You can pay the overstay fine at the airport or using pagalo.pe.

      The counter at the Jorge Chavez International Airport is open as long as international flights depart.

      While for years only cash payments in Soles or US$ (the exchange rate is miserable, so best have enough Soles on hand) were accepted, one of our readers informed us that at least since August 2022 additionally credit card payments are an option as well.

      The process is explained in detail in our article Peruvian overstay fine for tourists and specifically under point How and where to pay the overstay fine.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    daniel · 29/05/2023
    hi again,

    since i really fell in love with peru,and there is still so much to explore,iam planning another trip november 1st 2023 ! the thing is that i wanna fly back from lima on lets say march 1st 2024!
    so its 4month total!

     i also wanna see ecuador for 2-3weeks! 
    so my idea is to lets say go to ecuador or maybe even colombia after 80days of peru

    stay there for 2weeks or even 1month but then return to peru! (not sure if by air or land)
    because my return flight will be from lima !


    as i understood,there is no guarantee if and how many days i will receive from the immigration officer when trying to re enter peru!
    but i think i rather wanna try this option then "overstaying" !

    could it be a problem that they wouldnt let me back into peru
    even if i would show a return ticket from lima!?

    hope to hear from you!
    lovely greetings

    daniel




    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/05/2023
      @daniel
      Hello Daniel,

      as you already said, there is no guarantee how many days you will get when you enter Peru in November and when you return to Peru after your short trip to Ecuador. You are not entitled to get the full 90 days or stay the full 183 days per year. So, no-one can tell you what will happen as it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer.

      Additionally, it seems that you have been in Peru before. Depending on when this was, be aware that the max number of days you can stay in Peru per year (not per calendar year, but counted from your first entry) is 183 days.

      With this being said, if you haven't overstayed in Peru before and have been outside Peru for at least 3 months, you should be able to get 90 days when you enter in November. If not, best ask friendly for it, if necessary schmoozing the immigration officer a bit.

      Personally, I think it's a wise decision to not overstay and leave Peru before your 90 days are up. Furthermore, even though there is always a slight possibility that the immigration officer won't let you re-enter, if you haven't overstayed before and if you haven't already stayed the max of 183 days per year, you should at least get another 30 days, especially as you can show a flight ticket out of the country on a certain date.

      Have a nice trip to Peru and enjoy your time.

      Greetings
      Eva

    • This commment is unpublished.
      daniel · 30/05/2023
      @Sunflower hi Eva and thx for the fast reply!

      yes i have been to peru twice now! and there is always a break of at least
      8-9month until i ll come back,but now i ll prefer more then 3month ! ;)

      have a good evening

      Daniel :)


    • This commment is unpublished.
      daniel · 23/07/2023
      @Sunflower hello again,
      this time i need to buy a flight ticket which is covering my 4month!
      in the past 2 visits i always had my roundticket 90days max.
      actually they never checked if i have had a return ticket! 

      but of course i always do have a return flight...
      the only concern iam having this time
      is that my return ticket wont be within the 90days (3month)

      iam  planning on flying in and out from lima!
      do you think if they gonna check,they could give me some trouble?

      lovely greetings again

      daniel

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/07/2023
      @daniel Hello Daniel,

      Peruvian law requires that foreign visitors must have a return or onward passage out of the country if they aren't residents, proving that they leave the country when the visa or temporary authorization to enter expires.

      However, when entering the country, Peruvian immigration officials hardly ever ask to see this proof. The ones executing above regulations are usually the airlines.

      Honestly, in case the airline (rather likely) or immigrations in Peru (rather unlikely) asks for your return ticket, I don't think that you will have a problem when it shows a return 4 months later and won't bother. And if, you can always tell them that you are spending some time in Ecuador and return to Peru to fly home again.

      Greetings
      Eva 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      daniel · 24/07/2023
      @Sunflower hi eva,
      i really appreciate you fast and detailed responds,thx!
      yeah i agree,i hope it will all work out! 
      airlines like klm for example do sell tickets within a period of  4month or even 6month,so i dont think there will be a problem! but you never know ;)

      greetings,
      daniel
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Joe · 22/03/2023
    I have a question: I am planning a trip to Peru and Ecuador in the same trip. Would that cause complications?

    Fly into Lima- fly to Quito- Fly back to Lima then Fly back to the United States.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/03/2023
      @Joe
      Hello Joe,

      assuming you are a US passport holder, I don't see any reason to worry or any complications. You can enter both Peru and Ecuador as a tourist visa-free.

      You can stay in Peru for up to 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days per year as a tourist, and I think in Ecuador up to 90 days in a year. If you don't plan to exceed these amount of days and there is nothing I'm not aware of you are fine.

      Additionally, both countries eliminated all Covid entry requirements last year.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Nick · 24/02/2023
    Thanks for a useful article.
    I entered Peru for the first time a month ago, I hold a New Zealand passport, on my entry stamp it says 90 days, now I need to enter Ecuador for a few days and back again for business matter. My question is can I enter normally since I used only 30 days from my 90 days in 180 rule or since the visa officer wrote 90 days on my visa it's counted as using them although I stayed only 1 month?
    Thanks 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 24/02/2023
      @Nick Hello Nick,

      when you entered Peru the immigration officer gave you 90 days. So, you are allowed to be in the country for 3 months starting from the day you first came to Peru. In case you leave before these 90 days are over, your “authorization to stay as a tourist” (nothing more than the entry stamp in your passport and an entry in the Migraciones database) is canceled and the remaining days expire.

      When you re-enter the country, you will get a new “authorization to stay as a tourist”. And it’s at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days he/she gives you. As you are allowed up to 90 days in a 180-day period and only stayed 30 of it, you should get at least the remaining 60 days or as you haven’t stayed the full 183 days per year perhaps even another 90 days; or just 30 days or whatever the immigration officer gives you, nobody can tell you. Be aware you don’t have the right to get the remaining 60 days or any number of days; it’s completely up to the immigration officer.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Law · 22/01/2023
    Hi as it stands now dose visa required of Nigeria National to enter Peru. A Nigeria getting Pre registration migraciones Can he/she enters Peru without Tourist Visa.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/01/2023
      @Law
      Hello Law,

      the pre-registration, which doesn't really work for most visitors at the moment, has nothing to do with a visa obligation of some foreign nationals.

      So, yes, Nigerian passport holders must apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru. As there is no Peruvian consulate in Nigeria, you must apply at the Peruvian consulate in Accra, Ghana.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jay · 28/12/2022
    Hi - I am a US citizen interested in going to Cusco Peru for 30-40 days in the summer of 2023 as a tourist and to take a Spanish class. Will I need to get special permission to take the class?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/12/2022
      @Jay
      Hello Jay,

      no, you don't need a special permission if you take Spanish classes at a language institute and stay a month or so.

      Just come to Peru as a tourist, enjoy your time and take your classes.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jake · 29/11/2022
    Hello!

    I am a US citizen who has been to Peru five times, starting on December 11th, 2021. I have a girlfriend in Lima, and I lived at her house for six months this past year. I went to Peru initially from December 11-22nd, then again from December 28th- March 3rd, from April 28th- June 25th, from August 15-September 15th, and from October 26th- November 4th. Every time I went to Peru, I was given 90 days almost every time and never had to pay an overstaying fine because I didn't stay past 183 days in a year. However, the 5th time I was in Peru,(from October 26-November 4th), the immigration officer asked me how long I will be in Peru for and I said 10 days and he gave me 52 days, which was a weird number. We are in Chile right now waiting until December 12th to enter Peru again because we think I will be given more time when I enter Peru and because I am only allowed to stay in Peru up to 183 days in a 365-day time period for a US citizen. I am looking to try to purchase a plane ticket out of Peru in March on my 89th day in Peru (if they give me another 90 days). Do you think they will give me another 90 days since my 365-day time period is up? Again I have never paid an overstaying fine because I never overstayed, and I stay at my girlfriend's house and give them the exact same address every time. Thank you so much for your time!

    Also, one last thing, every time Peruvians officially have stamped my passport, it has always been vertically. However, this last time the official stamped it horizontally, and I don't know if this means anything. Thanks again! 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/11/2022
      @Jake Hello Jake,

      Adding all your stays from December 11, 2021, when you first entered until November 4, 2022, when you left for the last time, you’ve been in Peru for 174 days; so, you are well in the max allowed time of 183 days per year. On December 12, 2022, a new 365-day period should begin, and you should be able to get up to 90 days when you re-enter Peru.

      But, be aware that you do not have a right to get the full 90 days when you enter the country; it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer you have to face, how many days he/she allows you to stay. At any time, for whatever reason, the immigration officer could give you only 10 days or 30 or whatever number he thinks appropriate. There is no guarantee.

      Additionally, even though you never overstayed, many entries and exits may raise suspicions and you might be questioned about it.

      And no, I never heard that the placement of the entry stamp is some sort of secret message, but it could, of course, be. Nevertheless, you haven’t overstayed your max time per year in Peru and as a new 365-day period starts for you on December 12, you can re-enter; the question is how many days the immigration officer will give you. Something I can’t predict.

      Wishing you all the best


      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Jake · 29/11/2022
      @Sunflower Perfect, thank you so much for your reply, Eva! I really appreciate your response. 
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Paul · 22/11/2022
    Hello! 

    I am a US Citizen and I traveled the first time to Peru for myself on June 23rd and returned to the US om July 2nd, I am planning on doing a trip to visit my girlfriends parents in just a couple days, I was given 90 days upon entry. I seem to of calculated the difference of 143 days. Will I have any issue coming back into Peru? I just found this article and wasn't aware of this.

    Thanks for the help!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/11/2022
      @Paul Hello Paul,

      Not sure what you weren’t aware of. Anyway, US passport holder can stay in Peru as a tourist for up to 90 days in a 180-day period (so three months in half a year) and a max of 183 days in a year.

      You entered on June 23 and left on July 2; that’s only 9 days. Your 180 day-period ends on December 20, but you have up to 81 days (90-9) left that you are allowed until December 20 (not sure how you ended up with a difference of 143 days).

      So, yes, you shouldn’t have a problem returning to Peru in a couple of days, but be aware that the number of days you are given when you (re-)enter is always at the discretion of the immigration officer. He can give you any number of days he feels comfortable with, so just 30 days, for example, or the remaining 81 days or the full 90 days. You surely won’t get more than that.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Daniel · 15/11/2022
    I had visited Peru from July 13 to September 2, so about 52 days. I was given 90 days upon entry. I want to visit again from December 10 to January 29, so another 50 days. The 180 day time period would reset January 9, but I still had 38 days on the original 90 days granted.

    Do you think this would be an issue?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 15/11/2022
      @Daniel
      Hello Daniel,

      if you haven't stayed before your July trip as tourist in Peru, I think you shouldn't have any problems entering Peru and even getting another 90 days as you haven't used the max of 183 days in a year.

      So, no, under normal circumstances you won't have any issues. But as everywhere around the globe, it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days he/she is allowing you to stay.

      Have a nice trip

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Ron Vesci · 13/10/2022
    Hello. I am from USA
     I visited Peru 3x in 2021-2022…
    Dec 24 2021 Thru Jan 28 2022
    May 2 2022 thru May 17th 2022
    August 27 2022 thru Sept 30, 2022

    I’m going back to marry my Peruvian Princess in December. Will I have an issue entering. 

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 13/10/2022
      @Ron Vesci Hello Ron,

      As a US passport holder, you can stay in Peru up to 90 days in a 180-day period and max 183 days in a year.

      You just have been in Peru 35 days in December / January, 15 days in May and 34 days in August / September; together 84 days in over 9 months, until December, when you plan to re-enter, in over 11 months.

      So, when you return in December you shouldn’t have any problems entering and getting the full 90 days. But be aware that it’s always up to the immigration officer how many days he/she is giving you. And just in case the immigration officer questions why you entered so often, just tell him/her about your “Peruvian princess” that you are about to marry, which should end all further un-called-for questions.

      Wishing you all the best and congrats!

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Sean · 02/10/2022
    Hola!

    If i read this correctly as an america want to move there when i retire, but that is a few years off and i will need to work remotely until then. Any advice?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 03/10/2022
      @Sean Hello Sean,

      I don’t understand what advice you are looking for and what your plans are.

      Do you want to move to Peru now? Or when you retire in a few years?

      If you are planning to move to Peru when you retire, your best option is to apply for a rentista residente visa. You find more information about this resident visa, including requirements and how to apply in our article “Peruvian retirement visa”.

      If you want to move to Peru now, depending on your circumstances, getting a proper resident visa might be difficult. As a tourist, you can only stay in Peru up to 90 days in a 180-day period; so, max 3 months in Peru and then at least 3 months out of Peru. Not really an option for a long-term stay.

      Since March 2017, Peru offers the so-called "independent work visa" (trabajador residente independiente). This visa gives independent professionals (for example, freelancers) the right to stay long term and work legally in Peru without being employed by a Peruvian company; however, a "service contract" with a Peruvian company has to be presented. The requirements and application process are the same as the ones for a work visa; but instead of the work contract, you have to have a service contract.

      Then another option for you to get a Peruvian resident visa might be to set up a Peruvian company as a foreigner (be aware that you need a Peruvian (silent) partner who owns a small percentage), then employ yourself as the general manager, get your work contract approved by the Peruvian Ministry of Labor and then apply for a work visa. I highly recommended to discuss the details with a trusted Peruvian notary or lawyer.

      Other options include marrying a Peruvian and apply for a family visa; invest S/ 500,000 and apply for an investment visa; extend your knowledge, study at a Peruvian university and apply for a student visa.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    williams · 11/09/2022
    hola-

    maybe i missed it in the article. recently, i received 90days on arrival. i got a copy of migration document from a hotel and it stated 90 days. "if" i stay over 90day and up to 180 days. it is 4.6soles per day from day 90 to day 180 payable at the airport at passport control?

    this was similar to 2021 i paid "a" 85-day overage at the airport?

    william

    us passport
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 11/09/2022
      @williams Hello William,

      In our above Tourist Visa article, you find a short explanations about having to pay a fine for overstaying in Peru under chapter “Expired tourist visa”.

      Additionally, our article “Peruvian Overstay Fine for tourists” is dedicated entirely to the overstaying topic including the legal backgrounds, implications and how and where to pay the fine.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Calvin · 06/09/2022
    Hello!

    I entered Peru on May 14, 2022 and because I counted the days wrong I stayed until August 19, 2022 (one week past the 90 days). I’m just curious what day I can re-enter Peru and get another tourist visa. I believe it’s 180 days after May 14,2022 but not sure. Let me know when you get the chance, thank you!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 06/09/2022
      @Calvin Hello Calvin.

      Most nationalities are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist up to 90 days in a 180-day period; so, at most three months in Peru and at least three months out of Peru. Additionally, tourists can only be in Peru for a max of 183 days in a 365-day period; so, more or less two times 90 days in two consecutive 180-day periods.

      If you entered Peru on May 14, 2022, your 180-day period ends on November 10, 2022. So, the earliest you should return to Peru is November 11, 2022. But as you overstayed and there are no regulations published how this affects the 180-day period, I can’t base my answer on the Peruvian law. Additionally, you have no right to get the full 90 days when you enter Peru. It’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer if he/she lets you enter at all (never heard of anyone ever being denied entry in cases like yours) and how many days he/she is willing to give you.

      With this being said, I think you shouldn’t have a problem returning to Peru mid-November or so and getting another 90 days.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    CH · 04/09/2022
    Hi Eva 

    I just left Peru and thought I would give my experience. 

    I don’t know if immigration officials don’t know the rules or are being more strict but I have had problems both leaving and entering Peru this year as a U.K. citizen. I entered Peru on 28th October 2021 and although I was asked how long I was staying, and replied 88 days, I was only given 30. I left Peru on 17th February 2022 without problems after paying the fine. 

    I returned to Peru on 8th June 2022 and was told by the immigration official that I had used all my days and was then asked lots of questions and asked to show my return ticket. They did give me 90 days after this.

     I left Peru on 3rd September 2022 so 88 days, but after being subjected to many questions by immigration. He actually asked me to come round his desk and look at the computer screen showing my entries, which are just the above plus 2, one week long entries in 2019. I was told by this immigration official that I could not re-enter Peru this year. Though when I insisted  I’d like to return on 20 December he replied “podría ser”. 

    I’m hoping to get a work visa via the creating a company method with the help of a lawyer and gaining residency in Peru. I will try and re-enter Peru on 20 December and see how it goes, but I’m now dreading all of the questions. 

    Btw, immigration does now stamp passports, I received both entry and exit stamps on this trip.

    Greetings 

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/09/2022
      @CH Hello CH,

      Thank you so much for taking the time to write to LimaEasy and share your experience in such detail with us.

      Exactly feedbacks like yours are so valuable not only to keep LimaEasy as up to date as possible but also to help other travelers visiting Peru on a regular basis and make them aware of the one or other strange situation they might encounter.

      You are actually not the first one who only got 30 days without reason and who describes being told by immigration officials that he already used all of the days even though after checking the dates everything seems to be within the allowed time frame and sometimes within the tolerance range. So, I’m not sure what is going on, either the one or other official can’t count, or doesn’t know the regulations, or likes to play power games (it’s always at the discretion of the immigration official how many days you get), or something is afoot.

      Anyway, I just checked your dates. The 2019 dates shouldn’t count anymore. So, you entered the first time on October 28, 2021, adding 90 days which you can stay we are at January 26, 2022; even though you overstayed longer as you just got 30 days, you were in Peru 22 days longer than the max allowed time, usually not a big deal. Your first 180-day period ended on April 26, 2022.

      As Migraciones announced that they count the 180-day periods from the first entry of a visitor, your second 180-day period should have started on April 27, 2022. When you entered on June 6, 2022, you were well in your second 180-day period, got 90 days, stayed less and the second 180-day period should end on October 24, 2022. Then a new 180-period should start, and you are allowed another up to 90 days.

      But it might be as well possible that your second 180-day period only started with the date of your second entry on June 6, 2022. But even then, you stayed less than the 90 days you got when you left on September 3, 2022. The 180-day period ends on December 5, 2022. So, after that you should be fine to re-enter Peru and get another up to 90 days in a new 180-day period.

      So, I really don’t understand the statement of the immigration official.

      And yes, as mentioned above, since May 2022 passports are stamped again.

      I wish you all the best and hope you manage to set up your company and get a work visa to avoid these unpleasant situations.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      CH · 08/09/2022
      @Sunflower Your website is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in travelling to Peru, so it's nice to be able to contribute in some small way. 
      You're right that I was only 22 days over the 90, but I guess that because I technically overstayed 82 days according to the form I was given when I left, this is what has caused me problems. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/09/2022
      @CH Sometimes the ways of Migraciones are inscrutable.

      And thanks again for your praise and your contribution.

      All the best

      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      LR · 24/10/2023
      @Sunflower Hi Eva,

      First of all - wow. thanks for compiling all of this information. Considering what migraciones etc share, and how each agent has a different answer, we'd really be in the dark without your excellent work.


      24 April 2019: First entry into Peru 
      30 Jan 2020: left Peru

      29 Nov 2020: entered Peru
      23 Jan 2022: left Peru

      05 April 2022: entered Peru
      91 days
      05 July 2022- left peru

      25 September 2022: entered Peru
      154 days
      24 Feb 2023: Left Peru

      28th July 2023: Left Peru

      23rd October 2023: Flagged as having spent too much time in this 180 or 365-day period.

      Previously i was advised and under the impression that 183 days were allowed per year, with first entry used as the start date.

      Using the extensive information on this website (thanks SO MUCH!) and after reading through all the comments, what I understand is that my 365-day period renewed 24 April 2023 (since then I've been in the country 87 days) - as per my first entry into the country, and that my 180-day period renews on 21 October (again, as per my 1st entry).

      This would mean I've not overstayed my 183 days, and that i have a fresh 90 days, if i'm understanding everything correctly.

      I've been extremely confused about how they calculate my days, considering I'm showing up as having overstayed in this current period.

      Then I saw this comment and realised i might be missing something.

      What did you mean by '2019 dates shouldn't count anymore'?

      I'd love to work out when I can come back without the risk of being turned away.

      Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

      Btw, I'm from the UK. And on the Visa list instead of saying 90/180, or 90, or 183 - it says nothing!

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 25/10/2023
      @LR Hello LR,

      Wow, let me try to get through this.

      First of all, thank you so much for your nice words.

      And yes, since the UK left the European Union, the publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs doesn’t state anymore how long Brits can stay in Peru as a tourist. The space is blank and wasn’t filled in the past three years, which make it impossible for UK nationals to know how long they can stay and gives Peruvian immigration officers lots of room for interpretation. However, when I remember correctly, around 2021 or so the UK and Peru signed an agreement allowing Peruvians to stay in the UK for 180 days per year and UK passport holders 180 days in Peru, which are divided into 2 times 90 days in two 180-day periods.

      Nevertheless, foreigners don’t have the right to get the full 90 days in half a year or stay the full 180 days per year. It’s always up to the immigration officer you have to face if you are allowed to enter and how many days you get. You are completely at his/her mercy. And, while many are quite relaxed, over the last year or so immigrations got stricter, especially with foreigners who regularly visit Peru as a tourist and who overstayed, especially for long periods of time, which you did.

      Unfortunately, there isn’t a clear answer on when you can come back to Peru. Migraciones hasn’t published any information about how exactly the 180-day periods and 365-day periods are calculated, especially if there are overlaps / foreigners entering before their 180/365-day period is over and how overstaying effects the calculation. And as stated many times before, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer, so no-one can tell you at what date you can re-enter without having any problems or how many days you will get.

      So, below my view on things that might help you get another perspective and might give you some arguments when you try to re-enter.

      In my opinion the “2019 dates” as mentioned in an answer above and your 24 April 2019 to 30 Jan 2020 stay shouldn’t count anymore as back then the rules were different. Nevertheless, already back then you stayed over 280 days as a tourist in Peru when only 183 days were allowed.

      Then you stayed again in Peru from 29 Nov 2020 until 23 Jan 2022. That’s a staggering 420 days. Yes, I know it was during Covid and an amnesty was in place, so you didn’t have to pay the overstay fine and your excessive overstay should have been waved.

      Personally, now we are getting to the dates that still count:

      You entered again on 05 April 2022, left 05 July 2022; if you got 90 days when you entered you just overstayed a day, which shouldn’t cause any problem. I assume Migraciones started fresh from 05 April, meaning that the 180-day period ends on 02 October and the 365-day period on 05 April 2023.

      So, when you re-entered on 25 September 2022, your 180-day period wasn’t over. You then stayed over 150 days, so, assuming you got 90 days, you overstayed your welcome again by 2 months when you left on 24 Feb 2023.

      Then you only wrote “28th July 2023: Left Peru”. When did you enter? Or did you enter on 27 Jul and left 23 Oct and they flagged you? Or did you come back to Peru on 23 Oct and they wouldn’t let you enter or only gave you a few days?

      So, taking all your visits to Peru into account, unfortunately, you have a history of overstaying. Not good and a red flag for every immigration officer. And as said before, Migraciones hasn’t published how they take the overstaying into account and if and how due to the overstaying the 180-day and 365-day periods might shift. So, your new 180/365 day period isn’t just “renewed”. But if you entered somewhere in 2023 again and stayed already 87 days, it’s now a complete mess to sort out and impossible to guess how the immigration officer evaluates your case.

      So, I’m really sorry, that I can’t give you the clear answer you were looking for and, especially as I’m not sure from when to when you stayed in Peru in 2023, can’t recommend how to proceed and when it could be safe to return.

      All the best.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Anastasiia · 08/08/2022
    Hello guys. In the pdf file it says that Ukrainians can stay 90 days ( without any specification of time frames). I left Peru on 2nd of July and overstayed 1 day and had to pay When I can come back to Peru again?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/08/2022
      @Anastasiia Hello Anastasia,

      Even though not specifically mentioned you have up to 90 days in a 180-day period.

      If you left Peru on July 2, overstayed one day and assuming you got 90 days when you entered, you came to Peru on April 2. So, your 180-day period ends on September 29, 2022.

      The earliest you can enter Peru again is on September 30. And then you shouldn’t have a problem getting another 90 days.

      Greetings
      Eva

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