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Tourist Visa extension in Peru

Tourist Visa extension in Peru

How to extend your tourist visa in Peru

For the past two decades, every few years the regulations in Peru would change, determining if foreigners can extend their stay as a tourist in the country or not. Since August 2021, foreign tourists couldn't extend their time in Peru anymore. However, this general “no” for tourist visa extensions was softened with the implementation of new Migraciones administrative regulations on October 22, 2023, which allow foreign nationals from member countries of the Andean Community, and only these (!), to extend their stay as a tourist again and abolished with the new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582 on November 14, 2023.

The new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582, published on November 14, 2023, states that foreign tourists can stay in Peru for 183 accumulated days in a 365-day period; so, half a year within one year. It further describes that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days, an extension can be granted until the 183 days are reached, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

As till today (end of January 2024) the administrative regulations, called TUPA, necessary for the implementation of the new Foreigner Law still haven't been published, we don't know, which foreign nationals can extend or for which nationalities there might be restrictions or when foreigners might be able to extend or how it works. The only foreign nationals, who already now can extend their stay as a tourist, are Bolivians, Ecuadorians and Colombians, which is stated in the TUPA from October 2023.

Anyway, right now we have to wait for more official news.

Overview

To understand what's going on with tourist visa extensions in Peru, first some important background information about the situation from May 2018 to March 2020 and from March 2020 to August 2021, and then the unpleasant situation since August 2021 and the new development that gives hope for the future since October 2023.

Tourist visa extension in Peru, May 2018 to March 2020

From May 15, 2018 to March 2020, when Covid hit Peru, tourists who got less than the from the 2017 foreigner law allowed 183 days in a 365-day period when entering the country could extend their tourist visa, for those you can enter Peru visa-free the "temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist" (which is nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database while in Peru quick and easy online. The procedure was and still is called "Prórroga de Permanencia - PRPL". However, it seemed that the online extension process was only supposed to work for South American nationals according to bi- and multilateral agreements and Migraciones was a bit surprised to find that all nationalities, some with problems, could suddenly extend online.

Back then, the platform to extend a “tourist visa” was embedded in the Migraciones website - where you still, however unfunctional, can find it - and didn’t work properly. While some foreigners could extend without any problems, others got seemingly never-ending error messages from “no data record found”, to “information of the bank receipt not found”, to “requested extension days invalid”. If the problems were just the result of bad programming or that the system supposedly only was intended to work for some nationalities - which makes sense to me and seems plausible as the Banco de la Nacion payment code with which you paid for the extension under "prorroga permanencia" explicitly stated that this option is only for South Americans - we will never know.

Anyway, in June 2019, it got a bit more complicated - welcome to Peru. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs quietly published an updated list showing which nationals need a "real" tourist visa issued by a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru and which nationals can travel visa-free to Peru and for how long. With this new publication, the general rule to be allowed to stay 183 days in a 365-day period became outdated for most nationalities.

So suddenly and mostly unnoticed, next to Schengen State nationals, many other nationalities including, for example, US and Canadian nationals were only allowed to stay for up to 90 days in a 180-day period. Immigration officers increasingly applied the new regulations from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, giving many nationalities only the for their nationality allowed 90 days upon entry, which resulted in an increasing number of visitors in need of an extension and challenging the system.

Please see our PDF " Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this article to find out how long you can stay visa-free in Peru - this PDF is an English translation of the original from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which can be found here.

Tourist visa extension in Peru, March 2020 to August 2021

Then, in March 2020, Covid hit Peru, borders and airports were closed from one day to the other and thousands of tourists were stuck in the country for months. The Peruvian government assured all visitors that they can stay in the country, even with an expired "tourist visa" without having to fear any reprisals. As long as Peru is under the State of Emergency “tourist visa” extensions wouldn't be necessary and all overstaying fees would be waved. Additionally, visitors would get a 45-day grace period to leave the country after the State of Emergency is lifted.

Then in mid-2020, Migraciones - back then all offices were still closed - introduced a completely new online platform for Peruvians and foreigners, the Agencia Digital. Since then foreigners can for example change their immigration status (so apply for or change their residence visa), extend their residence visa, apply for different permits (such as the permit to sign contracts), check the status of several procedures, etc. online. One menu point of the Agencia Digital is named “Prórroga de Permanencia”, so the extension of your temporary stay which technically includes the tourist visa / authorization to enter as a tourist.

However, in March 2021 the Supreme Decree 002-2021-IN, which updated and partly changed the Peruvian foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) from 2017, and in July 2021 a new TUPA, which establishes new administrative regulations and procedures under the jurisdiction of the National Superintendency of Migration, was published. Both new texts lack any information regarding tourist visa extensions and only establish the rules and regulations for extending "real" temporary visas, such as a temporary student visa or the temporary work visa.

Tourist visa extension in Peru, August 2021 to October 2023

Despite still being in a State of Emergency, in mid-August 2021 Migraciones announced that - with air travel being possible for months now - the grace period for foreigners being in the country on an expired tourist visa /authorization to enter as a tourist is over. Starting August 20, 2021 foreigners who are in the country on an expired tourist visa / authorization to enter as a tourist have to pay the overstay fee of S/ 4.40 (0.1% of an UIT) per day they overstayed when leaving.

Furthermore, it was communicated that at the moment, the "tourist visas" of those that are already in the country are not extended anymore. Those visitors only have the option of leaving Peru or applying for a temporary or permanent residency.

Visitors who entered Peru in or after August 2021 might have noticed that they only got 90 days, which - except for a few nationalities - is now the number of days most foreigners are allowed to stay in Peru on a "tourist visa". See below pdf document "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay - October 2021" in the attachments.

And even today nothing changed. Tourists still can NOT extend their tourist visa / authorization to enter as a tourist anymore.

Tourist visa extension in Peru from October 22 to November 13, 2023

As already explained above, since August 2021, foreign nationals, those who can travel to Peru visa-free and those who have a real tourist visa in their passport, cannot extend their stay as a tourist in Peru anymore.

Upon entry all foreign tourists get up to (!) 90 days, which - except for a few nationalities - is the number of days most foreigners are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist in a 180-day period. But even those few nationalities, who are allowed to stay longer or who have a real tourist visa allowing them to stay longer, still only get up to 90 days upon entry.

However, while the number of days foreign tourist get when they enter the country for now seems to remain at up to 90 days, on October 22, 2023, a new TUPA, a document establishing the Migraciones administrative regulations and procedures, was published.

There you find that now foreign tourists in Peru, whose home country is a member of the Andean Community, which includes Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, can extend their stay as a tourist for up to 90 days if they don’t exceed the maximum allowed stay as a tourist of 180 days per year.

If you prefer to read the administrative procedure for the so-called "Prorroga de Permanencia de Turista por Estatuto Migratorio Andino" yourself check out the new TUPA. You find the information on page 235, which is page 238 of the PDF document.

At the moment it’s not clear how the extension works. It's as well unknown if there could be already plans allowing other foreign nationals to extend their stay as a tourist as well (or if there is a glitch in the system as we had from 2018 to 2020 making it possible that everyone, some with problems, could extend).

So, as of today, officially tourist visa extensions are only possible for foreigners from Bolivia, Colombia, and Ecuador. According to the current regulations, other foreign tourists still cannot extend their stay.

Tourist visa extension in Peru since November 14, 2023

On November 14, 2023, a new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582, was published, stating that foreign tourists can stay in Peru for 183 accumulated days in a 365-day period; so, half a year within one year. It further describes that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days, an extension can be granted, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

At the moment (end of January 2024) the administrative regulations, called TUPA, necessary for the implementation of the new Foreigner Law still haven't been published. So, we don't know, which foreign nationals can extend (exception: Bolivians, Ecuadorians and Colombians, who at the moment are the only ones, who can extend, as explained in the chapter above) or for which nationalities there might be restrictions or when foreigners might be able to extend or how it works.

Anyway, right now we have to wait for more official news. Or if you have any current information on the topic, please let us know.

Overstaying as a tourist in Peru

If your allowed time as a tourist in Peru is up, you either have to apply for a temporary or resident visa or leave the country. If you, however, decide to overstay, since January 1, 2024, a fine of S/ 5.15 (0.1% of an UIT) per overstayed day in 2024 (S/ 4.95 per overstayed day in 2023) has to be paid when leaving the country.

Our article "Peruvian Overstay Fine for tourists" explains in detail the legal backgrounds of overstaying, consequences of overstaying, and how and where you can pay the overstay fine.

Tourists who stayed longer than the number of days they were given when they entered Peru must pay a fine when leaving the country. While this usua...

 

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    Who needs a Visa for Peru or not – by country and the allowed length of stay
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  • This commment is unpublished.
    Snøfrid Steen Tellesbø · 10/02/2024
    Hi! This article is helpful, but I just want to make sure I'm in the clear.

    It seems like I do not need to apply for a visa inicially. I can just enter. 
    After 90 days I am planning to do a visa run to Ecuador. 
    Then I will come back to Peru and stay another 90 days - making it 180 days. And then I will leave the country. 

    Does this sound like an okey plan?
    Would I need to apply to enter again?

    Thank you!
    Snøfrid
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 10/02/2024
      @Snøfrid Steen Tellesbø
      Hello Snøfrid,

      according to the Peruvian Foreigner Law, in general, foreign nationals can stay in Peru as a tourist for 183 days in a 365-day period; so, half a year in a year. But a few years ago, a publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) eliminated this general 183 days in a 365-day period rule for most nationalities, who can travel to Peru visa-free, and divided it into two times 90 days in two consecutive 180-day periods.

      Even though the new Peruvian Foreigner Law (Decreto Legislativo 1582), which was published in November 2023, confirms that foreign nationals can stay as tourists in Peru for a maximum of 183 days in a 365-day period, the RREE publication is still in place.

      And as explained above the new Foreigner Law further states that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days, an extension can be granted, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

      But at the moment the administrative regulations, called TUPA, necessary for the implementation of the new Foreigner Law still haven't been published. So, we don't know, which foreign nationals can extend (exception: Bolivians, Ecuadorians and Colombians, who at the moment are the only ones, who can extend) or for which nationalities there might be restrictions or when foreigners might be able to extend or how it works.

      So with all this being said, at the moment foreign nationals who come to Peru as a tourist in most cases only get 90 days upon entry and an extension of the stay as a tourist is not possible (exception: Bolivians, Ecuadorians and Colombians).

      If you leave Peru after you already stayed 90 days and return before your 180-day-period is over, things can go two different ways: the immigration officer is doing his/her job by the book and could deny you re-entry (extremely rare) or gives you just a few days/weeks. Or, most probably, as you haven't stayed the full 183 days allowed in a 365-day period, you as well might get another 90 days without any problems.

      It's completely up to the immigration and his/her evaluation of your situation if you are allowed to re-enter and how many days you get.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Snøfrid · 12/02/2024
      @Sunflower Thank you so much! I guess i will just have to test my luck!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/02/2024
      @Snøfrid
      Have a nice stay in Peru and all the best.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Sebastian · 29/01/2024
    Hello there! thanks for the helpfulness here! 

    I'm in Peru travelling to learn with the Q'ero people here. I'm living with them at the moment and wish to stay longer. I arrived on December 6th and I'm planning on going back in June but I'm not sure how long I'm allowed to stay and if there is a way to extend the VISA beyond 90 days or even 180? Also, is there a way to avoid the fine that goes beyond 90 days ,as I'm on a very limited budget i'm looking at my options.

    Am I correct in that I am allowed to stay 90 days and then about 1 dollar per day up until 180 days? What happens after that ? Thank you so much! 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/01/2024
      @Sebastian Hello Sebastian,

      According to the old Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1350, and the new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582, which was published in November of last year, tourists can stay in Peru for a max of 183 days in a 365-day period. However, this general rule was and still is limited by a publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) for most foreign nationals, who can travel to Peru visa-free, to 2 times 90 days in 2 consecutive 180-day periods.

      But the new Foreigner Law further states that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days upon arrival, an extension can be granted until the 183 days are reached, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

      However, at the moment the necessary administrative regulations for the new Foreigner Law still haven’t been published. So, right now we only know that foreign tourists in Peru, whose home country is a member of the Andean Community, which includes Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, can extend their stay. Who else can extend or for which nationalities there might be restrictions or when foreigners might be able to extend or how it works is still written in the stars.

      With this being said, you most probably got 90 days when you entered the country. To confirm this, best check your so-called TAM Virtual on the Migraciones website under Consultas en Linea TAM Virtual. How it’s done is explained in our article How many days did I get under subpoint “Option 1 - Migraciones website”.

      If you got 90 days, then you must leave Peru by March 5.

      As the tourist visa extension is, as of today, not possible (except if you are a Bolivian, Colombian or Ecuadorian passport holder) - this could change tomorrow, next week or next month or whenever we finally get the new administrative regulations - you have two options:

      Overstay and pay the fine of S/ 5.15 (approx. US$ 1.35) per day you overstayed. And no, no way around paying the fine. If you overstayed you must pay. Sorry.

      Leave Peru and return a few days later hoping that the immigration officer will give you another 90 days. As it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer, there is no guarantee that you get another 90 days, you might only get 30 or 60 days. Or you might even be denied entry as you already stayed 90 days in half a year.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Med · 17/12/2023
    Hi I am canadian, they only gave me 30 days visa but I need 40 days, what should I do?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 18/12/2023
      @Med
      Hello Med,

      unfortunately, there is not a lot you can do. Either leave the country when your 30 days are up or overstay for 10 days and pay the fine.

      You find more info about overstaying in Peru and how to pay the fine in our article Peruvian overstay fine.

      Wishing you all the best
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    beeGee · 04/12/2023
    peruvian nationals get a 6 months tourist visa for USA. So it should be reciprocated the other way around. but the govt has changed the time to 90 days in 180 days - thats how it works for peruvians in schengen countries. so why has the govt applied this 90 day rule to US citizens when Pervuvians can get a 6 months tourist visa for USA? It doesnt make any sense at all!

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/12/2023
      @beeGee
      Hello beeGee,

      Sorry, I can't answer your question. You should ask the US Department of State why they negotiated certain conditions for US nationals visiting Peru.

      Anyway, I'm not sure if you are aware, but Peruvians cannot travel to the US visa-free. Even for tourism they must apply for a tourist visa at a US consulate. A long and frustrating process. And if Peruvians finally get an appointment after months of waiting most application are denied.

      So, I'm not sure, but would you prefer the same treatment?

      Right now US nationals can easily travel to Peru visa-free and stay up to 90 days for tourism purposes. To me this looks like the better deal.

      And you are right, the agreement between Peru and the Schengen States is fairer for both. Peruvians can travel to Schengen States visa-free for up to three months in half a year and nationals of Schengen States can travel to Peru for up to three months in half a year visa-free.

      Why the US treats Peruvians the way they do and why Peruvian authorities not only allow this but don't implement the same processes for US nationals visiting Peru, really doesn't make sense. But nothing we can change. And as you as US national seems privileged nothing to complain about.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      beeGee · 04/12/2023
      @Sunflower That is not just the Peruvians. But most nationals have to apply for a tourist visa to travel to the USA. Even Schengen countries. But once given, it is for 6 months. This is a general rule. Its a long and frustrating process because if you just looj number-wise, there are too many people who want to go to the USA and I mean not just from Peru but from all over the world.
      If Peru wants to reciprocate, they can change it from visa-free to having to apply for a visa prior to coming to Peru and then grant 180 days.
      But still keep the visa-free option of 90 days who dont want to go through the visa application process. I am in Indonesia at the moment and they do exactly that. Plus you can apply for visas online. No need to go to the embassy. In fact they give only 30 days visa-free which can be extended by another 30 days only. But they have a 6 month visa that everyone can apply for before coming.
      The loss is Peru's because that severely hinders the tourism economy. Take the example of Bali. Bali has become rich and is the number 1 hot spot tourist and digital nomad (even though they dont even have a digital nomad visa) destination in the world today.
      The govt can keep arguing why the USA does this and that...and get caught in the tit for tat. Or ramp up and get practical.

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/12/2023
      @beeGee
      First of all, Schengen State nationals do not need a visa to come to the US for tourism and business purposes. I know because I am one. They can visit the US for up to 90 days visa-free and just have to fill in the Esta.

      All the other countries you mentioned honestly have nothing to do with the bilateral relations between the US and Peru. 

      Additionally, your argument that US nationals can only stay 90 days in a 180-day period hinders the tourism economy isn't really a strong one. When I remember correctly, a US tourist stays on average just 8 days in Peru.

      Anyway, I'm publishing a website, I'm not in politics and diplomacy. So, I highly recommend you get in contact with the US Department of State and complain there why US nationals can only stay 90 days in a 180-day period visa-free. They are the one who signed the agreements.

      And if you don't like it, you can always choose another beautiful country that allows you to stay as a tourist whatever number of days.

      Wishing you all the best
      Eva


  • This commment is unpublished.
    Nick · 21/11/2023
    Hi,

    My friend from Colombia when passing land border from Ecuador to Peru had got their exit stamp from Ecuador and made an error and didn't get an entry stamp to Peru, they have stayed 2 weeks and leaving soon.

    Can you please let me know what will happen when they exit Peru soon?

    Thanks 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 21/11/2023
      @Nick
      Hello Nick,

      stamping of passports was eliminated when entering through Jorge Chavez International Airport in Lima on May 29, 2023 and in the following months as well when crossing into Peru on a land border.

      So, your friend should check his TAM Virtual on the Migraciones website under Consultas en Linea TAM Virtual and see if his entry was registered correctly. 

      How it's done is explained in detail in our article "How many days did I get under chapter "How to check your TAM virtual" Option 1: Migraciones website.

      If the entry is displayed, no problem, he can just leave.

      If the entry isn't displayed, he must get in contact with Migraciones.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    robin · 19/11/2023
    Good afternoon,

    I have a question, I am engaged to a peruvian woman, i went from 28 september to 4th of november already too Peru. But had too stay a week extra in Peru. now i wat too go the 30th of december to 4th of march because i dont know if that is allowed i hope somebody can say it is.



    Thank you already for answering.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 20/11/2023
      @robin
      Hello Robin,

      According to the foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) and a modification of the foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1582), which was published just a few days ago, tourists who can travel visa-free to Peru can stay 183 days in a 365-day period. However, this general rule is limited or better divided by a publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which allows most foreign nationals, who can travel to Peru visa-free to stay in Peru as a tourist for up to 90 days in a 180-day period.

      But be aware that it's at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days he/she gives you when you enter.

      As you only stayed 5 weeks last time (and assuming you haven't been in Peru within the past half year or year and already spent all the days allowed), when you return at the end of December, you can re-enter without a problem. But nobody can tell you if you get the full 90 days. As said before it's up to the immigration officer.

      Greetings
      Eva


    • This commment is unpublished.
      robin · 20/11/2023
      @Sunflower Hi eva this was in 2023 i hope i can go end 2023 too my fiancé , but i am a little nervous hoply you can help me with it 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 20/11/2023
      @robin
      Hello Robin,

      Peru doesn't count in calendar years but 180- and 365-day periods. So, if you only stayed the 37 days in September, October, November you shouldn't have a problem returning to Peru at the end of December. But no-one can guarantee that you get the full 90 days upon entry.

      It's at the discretion of the immigration officer. He/she might give you the full 90 days as you haven't stayed the max allowed 183 days over the past 365-day period or he/she could as well only give you 30 or 60 days. No-one knows. It's completely up to him/her.

      Nevertheless, as said before, you can return and, if necessary, ask for the full 90 days.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Rena · 26/10/2023
    I was told by my AirBnB person that you could apply for an extension to stay beyond the 90 days.  Trying to understand the legalities as I arrived in mid-August and have been here for about 60 days or so and was planning on visiting Columbia in mid-November and returning late November. Thing is, I will be leaving Peru for Columbia on the 86th day I have been here and returning 12 days later. Would I be given an updated number of days to stay in Peru? Was wondering if I should just visit Columbia from Peru and return before that 90 days just to save myself the hassle. Need advice. Thanks!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/10/2023
      @Rena Hello Rena,

      Already since August 2021, you cannot extend your stay as a tourist in Peru anymore. The only exception, which was implemented just a few days ago, are foreign tourists from any of the member countries of the Andean Community.

      So, if your AirBnB host told you that you can apply for an extension of your stay as a tourist, you might want to ask him how it’s done. I’m really curious about this, so please let me know.

      Then, if you got 90 days when you entered Peru in August (you can check the number of days you got on the Migraciones website under Consultas en Linea TAM Virtual) and leave after 86 days you won’t have a problem.

      Depending on your nationality, you can most probably stay in Peru as a tourist for 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days per year. So, when you try to re-enter just 12 days after you left, things can go many ways.

      According to the regulations, as you already stayed 90 days, you can only come back to Peru after the 180-day period is over, which would be somewhere in February. Over the past few months, I heard from other travelers that there are a couple of immigration officers at the airport in Lima following the regulations strictly and even denying foreigners re-entry.

      However, most immigration officers are much more relaxed, especially at land borders. So, if you haven’t spent the max allowed time of 183 days over the past year in Peru (and/or can prove that your flight home leaves from the airport in Lima) you can get any number of days; 30, 60 or even the full 90 days. No-one can tell you. It’s completely at the discretion of the immigration officer.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Rena · 26/10/2023
      @Sunflower Sorry for not indicating my nationality. I am an American and yes, as for the 2023 calendar year, my first date of entry was mid-August so thus far, I have about 60 days for the 2023 calendar year. So,  if I were to leave for Columbia before the 90 days is reached and return say 12 days later to Peru within that 90 day period, would my return to Peru would be less of a hassle? I understand that upon my return, Peru could potentially reset my number of days allowed which could vary with immigration officer.  It seems traveling prior to the 90 days would be more prudent. I thought this process would be easier. 

      I will check with the AirBnb contact if he knows something you don't but based on my online research, appears you are right. 

      Thanks!


    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/10/2023
      @Rena
      Rena, Peru doesn't count in calendar years but in 180-day and 365-day periods starting with your first entry. You can stay up to 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days in a 365-day period.

      So, for example, if you first entered Peru on August 15, 2023 and got 90 days you could stay until November 13, 2023.

      I don't understand what you mean that you have 60 days left this year. No, you haven't.

      Calculated from August 15 until today, you already have been in Peru for 72 days, which leaves you as of today with exactly 18 days for this 180-day period, which ends on February 11, 2023.  

      After that a new 180-day period starts, you officially can enter again and stay another 90 days. Your 365-day period ends on August 14, 2024.  So, overall, between your first entry on August 15, 2023 until August 14, 2024 you can only stay a max of 183 days.

      So, honestly I really can't follow your train of thoughts.

      And as said already in my first reply, if you leave Peru after having stayed around 90 days, and try to re-enter after just being outside the country for 12 days, you want to come back before your 180-day period is over. The immigration officer might or not let you re-enter and might give you another 90 days (no reset, an advance) as you haven't yet spent the max allowed 183 days in a 365-day period.

      So, let's assume you leave Peru on November 10, 2023, all good, and you want to return to Peru on November 22, 2023. You are lucky, the immigration officer is nice and without any problems gives you another 90 days. This means that you can stay in Peru until February 20, 2024. However, adding your two stays of more or less 90 days, you spent all allowed days in your 365-day period, which only ends on August 14, 2024. So, officially you will only be allowed to return to Peru after August 15, 2024.

      I hope the situation is now clearer.

      Greetings
      Eva

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/11/2023
      @Rena
      Hello Rena,

      just for your info, today a new Foreigner Law was published (decreto legislativo 1582, see attached screenshot) allowing extensions again. Migraciones hasn't published the corresponding procedures, but might be worth to have a look at it.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Rena · 14/11/2023
      @Sunflower Thank you for the update. 
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Kata · 20/10/2023
    Dear Eva,

    Thank you for all the information here, it is very helpful. I would be very grateful to hear your opinion about our situation.
    My husband and I, both Hungarian citizens, arrived in Peru on the 24th of September. We have planned our trip to be a bit less than 90 days, we have booked our accommodation, and bought our outward bus tickets to Bolivia in advance. However today we realized through the TAM virtual that even though I got 90 days, my husband only got 60.
    We would like to stay here as we had originally planned. Thanks to your articles we know about the overstay fees, which seems not to be a big deal, however if it is possible, we would love to solve it legally. We are thinking about border hopping before the end of the 60 day period.
    Do you think it might be a solution? Is there a chance that they will not let us come back?

    Thanks for your answer in advance,
    Kata
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 20/10/2023
      @Kata
      Hello Kata,

      that's so typical Peruvian giving you 90 days and your husband only 60.

      Anyway, as you can't extend your stay as a tourist anymore in Peru, you only have two options:

      1. Do nothing. Stay in Peru the time you planned and when you leave play dumb and be surprised that you got 90 days and your husband only 60. If necessary pay the fine for him and you will be good to leave. 

      Usually, I always recommend to not overstay and respect the time you were given. But honestly as your husband will only overstay two or three weeks, I don't know, if it's worth the hassle to leave and return. In such a case even I would just overstay and pay the fine.

      2. Leave Peru before your husband's stay as a tourist expires and return. Be aware that no-one can tell you what exactly will happen when you try to return to Peru. It's always at the discretion of the immigration officer if he/she lets you enter and how many days he/she is willing to give you.

      Nevertheless, as Hungarian passport holders you can stay in Peru up to 90 days in a 180 day period. So, most likely when you return  you shouldn't have a problem re-entering the country and getting at least another 30 days or even more (at least if you haven't stayed for more than 183 days in Peru within the last year).

      Which option you choose is up to you.

      All the best

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Scott · 05/09/2023
    Hello! What are the options in paying the overstay fee? Can I pay with CASH or can I pay with a CARD? Thanks in advance
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 05/09/2023
      @Scott
      Hello Scott,

      you can pay at the airport, at a border, at a Banco de la Nacion branch or on pagalo.pe. At the airport you can in cash in Soles and US Dollar as well as with credit card.

      More information about paying the overstay fine can be found in our article Peruvian overstay fine.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Deano · 05/06/2023
    Hi, sorry if this is a duplicate  question but i have been reading a lot below and cant understand when the clock on the 90 days gets gets reset....For instance I was in Peru dung march 2023 for 21days and plan going back in July 2023. So question is when i go back is the clock reset for 90 days or B) 90 days less the 21 days spent in March
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 05/06/2023
      @Deano Hello Deano,

      Yes, the whole thing is very confusing and I can’t answer your question as there is none.

      Officially, you can stay in Peru as a tourist for up to 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days per year. But you are not entitled to stay the full 90 days per half year or the full 183 days per year.

      So, let’s assume you entered on March 1, 2023, then your 180-day period ends on August 28, 2023. If you got 90 days when you entered in March, but only stayed 21 days, the "remaining" 69 days of your “authorization to enter and stay as a tourist” (your entry stamp and an entry in the Migraciones database) automatically lapsed when you left the country. When you re-enter in July you get a new authorization (be aware that immigrations plans to eliminate the entry stamp).

      With this being said, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days he/she is willing to give you and it’s as well up to him/her how he/she interprets the law.

      If you are lucky, you are given another 90 days, as you haven’t stayed in Peru as a tourist for the max of 183 days per year. Be aware that the 21 days from your first visit and the number of days you stay in July (and, if applicable, the following months) are added and when you try to re-enter later this year you most probably will only get the number of days left for a year.

      But it’s also possible that the immigration officer only gives you the remaining 60 days (no, you surely won’t get 69 days) as these are "left" within your 180-day period.

      Unfortunately, no-one can tell you.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    SM · 17/05/2023
    @sunflower
    Do you have a link to a government document that shows the "US citizens can stay in Peru as a tourist for up to 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days in a year."

    The "Requerimientos de VISA para extranjeros" just says 90 ,  Not 90/180 like it does for many other countries. 

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 18/05/2023
      @SM
      Hello SM,

      yes the requerimientos document only shows 90 days for US citizens. There is no government document showing 90 days in a 180-day period.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Brian · 05/07/2023
      @Sunflower So theoretically this is a gray area for US citizens? I'm a US citizen and my tourist visa expires in about two weeks. I'm considering either rolling the dice with a border run to Chile or trying to make an appointment at the Migraciones office here in Cusco and pleading with an agent. I'm traveling in my own car with a TIP, which is its own problem, but in my experience the aduanas are always happy to extend your TIP as long as your tourist visa is valid. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 05/07/2023
      @Brian
      Hello Brian,

      Since August 2021, Migraciones does not extend the stay of foreign tourists in the country anymore. So, paying Migraciones a visit quite certainly is a waste of time; but you could try.

      The point I was discussing with SM was that the document of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs shows that US passport holders can stay in Peru for 90 days. It doesn't say if these 90 days are in a 180-day period or in a 365-day period.

      Practice, however, has shown, that - as most other foreign nationals - US Americans as well can stay a max of 180 days per year. If you already stayed in Peru 90 days and leave the country, upon your return you might get another 90 days (if you haven't already stayed 6 months during the last year) or just 60, 45 or 30 or whatever the immigration officer is happy with. No-one can tell you how the immigration officer interprets the regulations and evaluates your case.

      As you are in Peru with your car on a TIP, I highly recommend to not overstay! Police/customs has the right to impound your car and I'm sure you don't want to go there.

      Greetings
      Eva


  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jirawat · 17/04/2023
    Hello! I’m Thai citizen and I can stay up to 90 days in Peru without a tourist visa. My question is very simple… how many times can I enter Peru within this 90 days window? I will arrive in Lima, then travel to Quito, then fly back from Lima. Not very sure if they will allow me to get in Peru again or not, I tried to find this piece of information from the official site too but doesn’t seem to get it.

    Thank you so much, much appreciated!
    Jape
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/04/2023
      @Jirawat
      Hello Jape,

      yes, as Thai passport holder you can travel to Peru visa-free for up to 90 days. But be aware that it's always up to the immigration officer how many days he/she allows you to stay.

      Anyway, upon entry you get an "authorization to enter and stay as a tourist" which is nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database and a stamp in your passport. This "authorization" is a single entry permission.

      So, let's assume you get 90 days when you enter Peru. When you leave after, for example, 20 days, the remaining 70 days automatically expire. When you return to Peru a week later or so, you get a new "authorization to enter and stay as a tourist". And as before it's up to the immigration officer how many days you are given.

      Honestly, if you don't exceed your 90 days and have your flight ticket out of Peru I don't think that you have to worry being denied re-entry.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Robert · 16/04/2023
    Hi, so i have a Dutch and South African passport. I travelled here to Peru on 17 october to travel and i was supposed to work in China in January but due to difficulties in getting my work visa i can only get my visa on 11 may or so. I have already made an appointment to get my chinese work visa from here in Peru. I think it is also required to present my valid peru visa at the chinese embassy while applying from here in Peru, because i am worried the chinese embassy here rejects me for not having a current valid visa in Peru. So now i am thinking of going to Chile and exiting on my Dutch passport, pay the penalty, and then re-entering Peru on my South African passport to go to my Chinese visa appointment here in lima on may 4 and then leave the country to China about on the 15th. I imagine i face some serious risks if i do this. What would you advise? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 16/04/2023
      @Robert
      Hello Robert,

      the first thing I would do is check what the Chinese consulate requires. So, do they really want to see that you are legal in Peru? Is a valid stay as a tourist enough? Or do they want to see a resident visa (which some consulates do)?

      In case you only need to be in Peru legally, your only option is to take the risk, leave the country and return to Peru. If they want to see residency you have a real problem.

      Anyway, when you entered Peru on October 17, you most probably got 90 days and by now  additionally overstayed 90 days. So, you already have been in Peru the max allowed time per year and you most probably won't be allowed to re-enter (at least not on your Dutch passport).

      So, I think your best option is to pay the overstay fine, leave on your Dutch passport and then come back to Peru using your South African passport. Usually no-one will connect the two different passports. Nevertheless, in case they start to ask strange questions remain friendly, explain your situation, have your Chinese work contract and appointment with you and you should be fine.

      All the best
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Brandon · 07/04/2023
    Hi there,
    My wife and I (USA & Belarus)would like to stay in Peru for upwards of 6 months as tourists. From my understanding, both of us can stay in Peru visa-free up to 90 days.

    If I am reading correctly from other comments here and the article, it is not possible to stay up to 6 months with an extension currently? I've done the extension route in other South American countries, so I am wondering if Peru is allowing that for both our nationalities.

    Thanks for helping!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 07/04/2023
      @Brandon
      Hello Brandon,

      no, sorry, since August 2021, you can't extend your stay as a tourist in Peru anymore.

      So, if you want to stay longer than the number of days you were given when you entered, you only have to options: either overstay and pay a fine of S/ 4.95 per day you overstayed or leave Peru and try to return. Be aware that it's always up to the immigration officer if he/she lets you re-enter and how many days you are given.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Christopher · 28/03/2023
    Hi Eva,
    My tourist visa is set to expire on April 9th and I have every document ready to go for work residency but am waiting on the ministry of labor to validate the work contract, the company’s accountant is doing everything she can to quicken the process, but I expect it will go through the week after my visa expires. What do you suggest? I almost wondered if it’s worth applying for the residency anyway and see if there is a way to update that document when it goes through. What do you suggest? I understand if the only solution is leave for 3 months then come back and apply but we are really trying to avoid that, but I want to get another opinion.
    Thanks!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/03/2023
      @Christopher Hello Christopher,

      I’m not sure how long it takes the Ministry of Labor to approve work contracts at the moment, but you still have nearly two weeks. So, for now I would wait, pray and hope for the best.

      If the approval of your work contract doesn’t go through in time, you have two options.

      You could leave the country and return (already a few days) later. I usually don’t recommend this option as there is always a (in your case slight) risk of being denied re-entry. However, even if you end up at the counter of a grumpy immigration officer who’s trying to give you trouble, explaining calmly and friendly your situation and showing all your documents already prepared for your work visa application (Ficha de Canje from Interpol, criminal record check with Apostille and translation, work contract, …) should do the trick and you should get at least enough days allowing you to apply for your work visa. A week or so ago another foreigner, who as well had trouble with his work contract and left and returned a few days later, informed me that upon his return the immigration officer was super friendly and told him, as he has a valid work contract, he has the right to enter Peru. I don't know if this is true. Anyway, he got another 90 days.

      If you leave, take your wife and son with you, so they get a new stamp in their passport as well hoping they give them another 90 days which hopefully is enough for your work visa to go through.

      Another option is to apply for your work visa without the work contract which is only possible with playing the system a bit. Make sure that you apply for your work visa when your stay as a tourist is still valid!

      To understand the following, check out our Work Visa article under Step-by-step guide to apply for a work visa in Peru.

      Follow the steps as described until you are on the “2nd page of the work visa application”. Here you must fill in some data and/or upload all for the work visa application necessary documents as PDF.

      The problem is that under one subpoint you must (!) upload your approved work contract. It’s an obligatory field. You can’t leave it blank as the system won’t allow you to continue with the application. So, you could upload your work contract without the approval of the Ministry of Labor. Then continue to upload all other required documents and finish the application process as described above.

      At the end of the process, you get the Solicitud de Cambio de Calidad Migratoria with the “numero de expediente” (your file number), the "fecha de publicacion" (application date) and a "codigo de verificacion" (verification code) and your access to your Buzon. As soon as you get this your time as a tourist stops and you are safe.

      Now, depending how quickly Migraciones reviews your application there are two scenarios:

      As you haven’t uploaded your work contract with the approval of the Ministry of Labor as required, Migraciones will send you a notification (can be as quick as a few days after your application or a month, two or three later) using the Buzon electronico requesting to upload, in your case, the work contract correctly approved. Be aware that these notifications are considered officially delivered. Usually, Migraciones only gives you a short deadline of 5 to 10 days to upload the requested document. So, check your Buzon regularly. You must react to the notification, otherwise your application could be canceled.

      As by then you will have the contract with the approval just upload it as described in the notification (you do it on the main page of the Agencia Digital in the left menu under Subsanacion).

      As you will have your approved contract shortly after your application and most probably before you hear from Migraciones and as Migraciones only accepts approved work contracts that are not older than 30 days when uploaded, you should try and upload it immediately after you get it.

      As far as I know, after your application you should find on the main page of the Agencia Digital in the menu on the left the point “Subsanacion” where you should be able to upload the contract even though Migraciones haven’t requested to do so yet. Another option is to upload it under Mesa de Partes, but I was told by other foreigners that this didn’t work for them or that Migraciones didn’t get the document and a few weeks later asked to upload the document again, this time under Subsanacion.

      So, both options have their pros and cons. Which way you go is up to you.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Christopher · 29/03/2023
      @Sunflower Thank you so much Eva, that is very reassuring that the other gentlemen was able to get a new 90 days when reentering the country. I think we have decided to go that route which leads me to another couple of questions. Our passports expire in September, so we decided to leave the country by going back to the US in order to renew our passports and be back in peru after about 3 weeks to a month. 
      My questions are:
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/03/2023
      @Christopher
      And your questions are???

      Somehow your comment is cut off ....

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Christopher · 30/03/2023
      @Sunflower I'm so sorry, not sure how that happened. 
      1. If I receive a new passport, will I need to get a new Interpol Clearance and work contract that reflects the new passport number or is there a way to let them know that my passport number is replaced by the new passport number?
      2. If the work contract is approved while I'm gone, but I am not here to sign it, do you know what the steps are? as far as I can tell, I'm not sure there is a way I can actually sign and get the approved contract while outside of the country.
      Thanks again!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 30/03/2023
      @Christopher Hello Christopher,

      When I read that you are leaving for the US to get new passports, at first I thought, good idea. Returning on another passport number should guarantee you another 90 days. But then I remembered that your old passport number is on the Ficha de Canje and probably as well on your work contract or perhaps even on your FBI record check. Additionally, you as well might be (pre-) registered with your old passport number at your place of work or wherever work-related necessary. I wondered if you really want to make things even more difficult for you by opening another can of worms.

      The problem I see is when you leave Peru on your old passport number, the person Christopher with old passport number leaves the country. When you return to Peru with a new passport number, the person Christopher with new passport number is registered in the Migraciones datatbase as being in Peru. So, as Christopher with old passport number isn’t in Peru anymore, he can’t apply for a residence visa, and Christopher with new passport number must enter the Agencia Digital, where you apply for your residence visa. And your application will, of course, be registered under your new passport number.

      All important documents you must upload, however, have your old passport number on it. As Christopher with old passport number isn’t in the country, not good. While you can apply and finalize the application, most probably when someone at Migraciones reviews your application he/she will stumble upon the discrepancy. Things then can go two ways, either Migraciones gives you the option to “explain” and accepts a copy of your old passport (unlikely) or you are asked to upload all documents, which have your old passport number on it, again with the correct new passport number (more likely). That not only means that all the work you have done over the past weeks was a waste of time, effort and money and you have to start from scratch, but the processing time of your visa application is slowed down which could have consequences for your wife’s and son’s family visa application.

      When you told me that you are considering leaving the country to “renew your tourist visa”, I didn’t know that your old passport expires in September. And here we have the next problem. If you leave the country and decide to return on your old passport, the immigration officer you have to face might not let you enter. Not because you already stayed 90 days in Peru as a tourist, but because upon arrival as a tourist the passport must be valid at least 6 months.

      So, no matter what you do you have some serious obstacles to overcome. Personally I would move heaven and earth to get your application into the system.

      And I can’t answer your second question. Since I can remember you first had to get the permit to sign contracts, then sign the work contract and after that get it approved by the Ministry of Labor. So, not sure if the process changed or why you worry about signing your work contract once it’s approved.  It should be signed to get approved.

      And signing the work contract when you are outside Peru at this stage of your preparation is absolutely counterproductive and will make things unnecessarily even more complicated.

      I can only recommend to not playing the system including its options / loopholes too much. It will result in more problems and a longer waiting time until you finally get your residence visa and carné.

      Greetings
      Eva

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