Typical Peruvian Fruits

Thanks to Peru's three major climate zones, coast, highlands and jungle, a great variety of fruits can be found in the country. Some are native to Peru, exotic or rarely known abroad, can be seen in every (super) market around the world. While you can buy bananas, apples, pears, grapes, passion fruits, papayas and many more common fruits on the Peruvian markets as well, have a look for some unique fruits coming originally from Peru or being important ingredients in the local cuisine.

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Limon Peruano

Typical Peruvian Fruits
The Peruvian lime is only around 3 to 4 cm, has a yellow to dark green skin and a light green inside. The key lime might be the closest lime variety to the Limon Peruano. But the Peruvian Lime is highly acidic, extremely sour and has an incomparable, distinct and strong flavor. Limon Peruano is one of the key ingredients in Peruvian cuisine.

Lucuma

Typical Peruvian Fruits
Lucuma is a subtropical fruit native to Peru and known as well as "the last gold of the Incas". Images of it have been found on ceramics of ancient Peruvian cultures. The round or ovoid fruits are green with a yellow to orange, fibrous flesh. Lucuma has a unique flavor of maple and sweet potato.

Chirimoya

Typical Peruvian Fruits
Chirimoya or Cherimoya, in English also known as Custard Apples, are native to the Andean highlands of Peru. The Chirimoya looks like no other fruit; it’s heart-shaped with rough-textured but thin skin which varies from a yellow-green to a dark green. The inside is white, juicy and fleshy with a creamy custard like texture and dark seeds that lo...

Aguaymanto

Typical Peruvian Fruits
The Aguaymanto is also known as Tomatito Silvestre, Tomatillo, Capulí or in the US as Peruvian cherry or cape gooseberry. The fruit is native to high altitude areas in Peru where it still grows wild and has been cultivated at least since Inca times. The Aguaymanto is well hidden under a non edible paper like skin. When ripe the fruit is of a yel...

Pitahaya

Typical Peruvian Fruits
he Pitahaya, also known as Dragon Fruit, pitaya, pitajon, yaurero and warakko, is native to Mexico, Central America and some Southern American countries like Peru. Pitahaya is the fruit of a cactus and comes in three colors: yellow with white flesh, pink with pink flesh and pink with white flesh. In strong contrast to its vibrant exterior the fl...

Pepino (dulce)

Typical Peruvian Fruits
The pepino or pepino dulce is native to the temperate Andean regions of Peru. The plant is not known in the wild and its origins are unclear. Pepinos come in different sizes and shapes, from small to large, round or oval. Their thin skin is of a deep yellow with purple lines. The brightly orange colored flesh is sweet, firm, very juicy and refre...

Guayaba

Typical Peruvian Fruits
Guayabas, better known as guavas, originated in Mexico, but already in ancient times these fruits were cultivated in Central and South America. Remains of the actual fruit and seeds were found during archaeological excavations in Peru revealing that Guavas were part of the diet and natural medicine of Pre-Incan cultures. Thanks to numerous healt...

Camu Camu

Typical Peruvian Fruits
The Camu Camu is native to the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest. The fruit is extremely acidic and has a taste comparable to a mixture of a sour cherry and a lime. The unique taste of Camu Camu can best be appreciated when processed in juices, jams, ice creams and yogurts. Camu Camu has an extraordinarily high content of Vitamin C.

Tumbo

Typical Peruvian Fruits
Tumbo is part of the passion fruit family. In English it's called banana passionfruit because its size and shape resembles a small thick banana. The orange, passionfruit-like cluster of black seeds and pulp is enclosed by a firm yellow skin. Normally tumbos are quiet acidic and tart, therefore seldom eaten raw. You can best enjoy the flavor of T...

Aguaje

Typical Peruvian Fruits
Moriche palm trees are native to the tropical Amazon regions of Peru. The palm fruits, which are called Aguaje in Peru, have a reddish-purple-brown tough skin with a texture similar to a pineapple. Beneath the skin is a thin layer of a firm, yellowish-orange pulp which covers a large seed. Agauje is eaten raw, in desserts or used to make juices,...
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LimaEasy is back home!

Editors Opinion
In 2006 we created LimaEasy just a few months after arriving in the Peruvian capital in a time when there wasn’t much detailed and especially up-to-date info in English about the city around. Within the following 8 years we made LimaEasy with lots of love and passion a household name and tremendous success with tourists, foreigners living in Peru, fellow entrepreneurs and everyone interested in...