34 Comments
Peruvian Tourist Visa

Peruvian Tourist Visa

A Guide to Peruvian Visas

Part 1

When planning a trip to Peru, eventually bureaucratic and visa related matters come to mind. As finding detailed and up-to-date information on this topic can be challenging, we put together comprehensive information and advice on all Peruvian tourist visa issues that might pop up.

 

Content overview

 

Peruvian tourist visa in a nutshell

  • Nationals of some countries need a tourist visa and have to apply for it at a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru; see PDF under attachments at the end of this really long article to find out if you have to apply for a tourist visa.
  • Nationals of other countries can travel visa-free to Peru and receive a "temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist for a certain time" (sounds fancy but since the end of May 2023 it's nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database) at the Peruvian border or airport upon entry.
  • Most nationalities that can travel visa-free to Peru are allowed to stay up to 90 days in a 180-day period for touristic, recreational or health purposes (see attached PDF at the end of this really long article to find out if you can enter Peru visa-free and how long you can stay).
  • Peruvian tourist visas issued at a consulate can be single entry or multiple entry visas; The "temporary authorizations" for those who can travel to peru visa-free are single entry.
  • All visitors coming to Peru need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival.
  • As in nearly all countries around the globe, foreigners are not allowed to work in Peru or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru while being in the country on a tourist visa / temporary authorization to enter as a tourist.
  • Tourists can only sign legally binding documents (work contract, sworn statement needed, for example, for changing your immigration status, car or apartment purchase, marriage license, ...) with a so called "Permiso para firmar contratos".
  • Extensions of tourist visas / authorizations to enter as a tourist are not possible anymore
 

Do I need a visa to enter Peru as a tourist?

Peru is a very welcoming country that signed agreements with many countries, allowing the citizens to travel visa-free to Peru for tourism. Citizens of below mentioned countries do not have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian embassy or consulate before coming to the county. They only need a passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival to get a “temporary authorization to enter and stay as a tourist for a certain time” (sounds great, but today is just an entry in the Migraciones database) directly at the immigration control at the airport or border. For a more detailed listing, please have a look at our PDF "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article for clarification.This PDF is an English translation of the original from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which can be found here.

Following nationals do not need a tourist visa for Peru

  • South America: Citizens of all South American countries except Venezuela
  • Central America: Citizens of most Central American countries (exception Cuba, El Salvador, Haiti and Nicaragua)
  • North America: Citizens of the United States, Canada and Mexico
  • Europe: Citizens of all countries within the European Union and Switzerland and UK
  • Africa: Citizens of South Africa
  • Asia: Citizens of Brunei, Indonesia, Israel, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand as well as some citizens of China and India (according to a supreme decree from September 2016 Chinese citizens and according to a supreme decree from March 2017 Indian citizens with a permanent (!) residence visa or a visa with a validity of at least (!) 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia can travel to Peru visa-free; other Chinese and Indian nationals still have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian embassy or consulate!)
  • Oceania: Citizens of Australia and New Zealand
 

How and where to apply for a Peruvian tourist visa

As already mentioned above, citizens of some countries need a visa even for touristic and recreational purposes (please have a look at our PDF "Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article for clarification.). As Peru doesn’t offer online visa applications, these nationals have to apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian diplomatic mission that has jurisdiction over their domicile or country of residence.

Requirements for the tourist visa application at a Peruvian Consulate

Required documents to apply for a tourist visa include, but may not be restricted to:

  • Application form
  • Valid passport
  • Round-trip ticket
  • Hotel reservation, tourist package reservation or invitation letter
  • Proof of sufficient funds
  • Passport photos
  • Proof of legal residency in the area or country under the consulates jurisdiction
  • Receipt for paid application fee

Please be aware that the consulate, where you apply, will invite you to a personal interview.

On the website of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) you find a world map showing all Peruvian consulates abroad. Just click on a marker and the address, phone number, e-mail and - if available - website of the consulate appears.

There is no Peruvian embassy or consulate in my country. Where do I apply?

Especially in Africa and Asia, where the residents of most countries still have to apply for a tourist visa, Peruvian consulates are scarce, website aren’t up-to-date and e-mails often aren't answered. So, finding the correct consulate, getting information and applying for the visa can be quite a challenge. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs unfortunately doesn't consistently publish which consulates have jurisdiction over which regions/countries. Therefore, if there is no Peruvian consulate in your country of residence, the only way to find out where and how to apply for a visa is by getting in contact with the nearest Peruvian diplomatic mission (which sometimes isn’t near at all) and ask if they are in charge or know who is.

 

How long can I stay in Peru as a tourist?

In March 2017, a new Peruvian Foreigner Law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) went into effect, allowing tourists who can travel visa-free to Peru for touristic, recreational or health purposes to stay for a maximum of 183 days within a 365-day period. Shortly afterwards, the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs excluded Schengen States nationals from this general rule, allowing them to stay for up to 90 days within a 180-day period. Then, in June 2019, a new publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) eliminated the general 183 days in a 365-day period for most nationalities, who can travel to Peru visa-free, and divided it into two times 90 days in two consecutive 180-day period.

While the new Peruvian Foreigner Law (Decreto Legislativo 1582), which was published in November 2023, confirms that foreign nationals can stay as tourists in Peru for a maximum of 183 days in a 365-day period, the RREE publication is still in place.

So, today, most nationalities who don’t have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru are given up to 90 days in a 180-day period upon entry; the 180-day period isn't per half year from January to June or July to December but calculated from your first entry.

Brazilian, Chilean, and Mexican nationals as well as those Chinese and Indian passport holders with a permanent residency or a visa with a validity of at least 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia, who are still allowed visa-free up to 180 days should know that Peruvian immigration often only gives them 90 days as well upon entry.

In case you have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru, it’s up to the consulate to decide the number of days you can visit the country. Be aware that even if the consulate issued a 180-day tourist visa, often immigration officers only give you 90 days when you enter.

While you generally can expect to get the full days allowed (if you haven’t overstayed your welcome before excessively or if you haven’t been in Peru before and now try to re-enter the country before your 180-day period is over), you should be aware that you aren't entitled to getting the full 90 (or 180) days. As everywhere around the globe, it’s at the discretion of the immigration officer if he or she lets you enter at all and how many days you are allowed to stay.

Please see our PDF " Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay" at the end of this very long article to find out if you need a visa to enter Peru or if you can travel visa-free and how long you can stay - this PDF is an English translation of the original from the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which can be found here.

 

Entering Peru

With the introduction of the new Immigration Law in 2017 and progressive digitalization, especially during Covid times, entering Peru today is a quite easy, seemingly organized and at least for now quick process.

Requirements

After a complete shutdown, Peru re-opened the country for international air travel in October 2020. Land borders only re-opened in mid-February 2022.

Finally, on November 1, 2022, the State of Emergency in Peru was lifted and all Covid entry requirements as well as all other regulations and restrictions that were in place to avoid the spreading of Covid were repealed.

So, entering Peru is back to "normal" and you just need your passport with at least 2 free pages in the visa section that is valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival and, if you have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru, your visa stamp.

Entry process

After leaving the plane (or at the border), just follow the flow to the immigration control; note: at the beginning of 2023, automated passport control machines were finally put into operations, but for the moment are reserved for Peruvian passport holders.

At immigration control just present your passport (which should have at least 2 free pages in the visa section and must be valid for at least another 6 months upon arrival).

While during the height of the Corona pandemic Peru eliminated the stamping of passports when entering the country, in May 2022 the entry stamp was re-introduced just to eliminate it again at the end of May 2023 for those entering Peru on international flights; and, unfortunately, this time it seems for good.

Today, your entry and the number of days you got is just automatically registered and nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database. Now tourist once again don't have anything in writing on how long they are allowed to stay as a tourist.

So, to find out how long you can be in Peru as a tourist, you must ask the immigration officer and, if you want to have a confirmation "in writing" or need proof when you entered or left the country, you have to check online. Our article "How many days did I get when entering Peru?" explains how it's done

While during the height of the Corona pandemic Peru eliminated the stamping of passports when entering the country, in May 2022 the entry stamp was...

Once you are finished at the immigration counter, proceed to the baggage carousel and claim your luggage.

Clearing customs

Since June 2022, the good old customs declaration form has served its time and was replaced by the App "Bienvenido al Perú" which is available on iOS and Android and in short details which items have or haven’t to be declared. So, if you have something to declare, download the App, fill in required fields and once in Peru proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.

Peruvian customs urges travelers to know and comply with Peruvian customs regulations. So, it's up to you to inform yourself. Our article “What you can & can’t bring into Peru” helps with this.

When travelling to a foreign country it’s always a good idea to know which items you can bring with no problems, and which ones you better leave at...

  • If you have nothing to declare, you don’t have to do anything. Clear immigration, get your luggage and proceed to the exit.
  • If you have something to declare, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.
  • If you carry more than US$ 10,000, download the App "Bienvenido al Perú", follow the instructions and fill in the form within 48h prior to your arrival in Peru. Once in Peru, proceed to the customs counters at your point of entry.

We highly recommend to be honest, as failing to declare taxable or dutiable items can result in fines of 50% of the custom value of the items if caught; failing to declare currency over US$ 10,000 results in a 30% fine on the amount you carry with you.

Before you can leave the airport, you and your luggage are scanned and you might be asked to follow an official for a thorough check of your luggage.

You made it! Welcome to Peru!

 

How many days did I get?

After not stamping passports during peak Corona times, in May 2022, tourists entering the country finally got an entry stamp again, making it easy to check how long they could stay in Peru.

Peruvian entry stamp
Peruvian entry stamp 2022

Unfortunately, at the end of May 2023 Peru eliminated the entry stamp again for those entering Peru on international flights.

So now, the only way to find out how many days you are allowed to stay as a tourist in Peru, is to ask the immigration officer or, if you prefer a written confirmation check online. Our article “How many days did I get when entering Peru?” explains in detail the legal background and gives you options to check the number of days you are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist.

While during the height of the Corona pandemic Peru eliminated the stamping of passports when entering the country, in May 2022 the entry stamp was...

 

Extension of a Peruvian tourist visa

For the past two decades, every few years the regulations in Peru would change, determining if foreigners can extend their stay as a tourist in the country or not.

Since August 2021, foreign tourists couldn't extend their time in Peru anymore.

However, this general “no” for tourist visa extensions was softened with the implementation of new Migraciones administrative regulations on October 22, 2023, which allow foreign nationals from member countries of the Andean Community, and only these (!), to extend their stay as a tourist again and abolished with the new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582 on November 14, 2023.

The new Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1582, published on November 14, 2023, states that foreign tourists can stay in Peru for 183 accumulated days in a 365-day period; so, half a year within one year. It further describes that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days, an extension can be granted until the 183 days are reached, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

At the moment (February 7, 2024), the administrative regulations, called TUPA, necessary for the implementation of the new Foreigner Law still haven't been published. So, we don't know, which foreign nationals can extend (exception: Bolivians, Ecuadorians and Colombians, who at the moment are the only ones, who can extend) or for which nationalities there might be restrictions or when foreigners might be able to extend or how it works. So, right now we have to wait for more official news.

You can find detailed background information on the topic in our article "Tourist Visa extension in Peru".

For the past two decades, every few years the regulations in Peru would change, determining if foreigners can extend their stay as a tourist in the...

 

Expired Peruvian tourist visa

Like in any other country, we recommend respecting the rules and regulations here in Peru, including the time you are allowed to stay in the country as a tourist.

However, if you overstayed your stay as a tourist a few days, weeks or even months - at least for now - you rarely have to fear extreme consequences. When leaving Peru you just have to pay a fine of 0.1% of an UIT (S/ 5.15 in 2024) per day you overstayed. The fee must be paid before leaving the country. In our article "Peruvian Overstay fine for tourists" we explain the details

Tourists who stayed longer than the number of days they were given when they entered Peru must pay a fine when leaving the country. While this usua...

Once the fine is paid, you can usually leave Peru with no reprisals.

Those having excessively overstayed their welcome (we are talking about many months or even years), however, might be additionally sanctioned with a re-entry ban for a certain time.

 

Border-hopping Peru

Between 2008 and 2017, border hopping was an easy and popular way to “renew” your tourist visa. Back then, the Peruvian foreigner law stated that visitors can enter Peru for touristic, recreational, or health purposes for 183 days. It however didn't mention if the 183 days were per year or per visit. So, many foreigners used this little gap in the old Peruvian immigration law to live in the country on a tourist visa. As soon as their visa was about to expire, they just crossed the border, stayed 5 minutes, a day or two, in one of Peru’s neighboring countries and returned asking immigrations for another 183 days. For years, this worked absolutely fine.

After the introduction of the new foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1350) in 2017 which rectified the loophole and the reduction of the time most nationalities can stay visa-free in Peru two years later, Peruvian border officials got stricter and increasingly applied the new rules giving foreigners only the back then allowed 90 or 183 days in a 180 days or 365 days period and didn’t let border-hoppers re-enter (or only for a few days) when they already stayed the maximum allowed time as visitor in the country.

Then in March 2020, Covid hit the country, borders were closed and Migraciones worked hard on digitalizing certain processes and procedures. Now, all entries and exits are saved in the Migraciones database and can be retrieved at all control points.

Since August 2021, travelers, who already stayed their allowed 90 days in a 180-day period, reported that when trying to re-enter the country at Lima’s airport before their 180-day period was over, that they were scolded and only given anything between 3 and 30 days. And according to reports from travelers who tried to re-enter Peru at a land border after already having stayed their 90 days, immigrations often only gave a few days up to a month. Others reported that they still got the full 90 days, however only if they haven't already stayed the max of 183 days in a year.

So, be aware that it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer and his/her evaluation of your situation how long you are allowed to stay in Peru.

One way or the other, the times of border-hopping seem to be over and foreigners wanting to stay longer in Peru should work on getting a "real" temporary visa (for example, a temporary work visa or a temporary student visa) or a residence visa. Our Visa Guide explains the most common temporary and residence visas including the legal background, requirements, necessary preparation work and a step-by-step application guide.

 

Do I need a return ticket when travelling to Peru?

Peruvian law requires that foreign visitors need a return or onward passage out of the country if they aren't residents, proving that they leave the country when the visa or temporary authorization to enter expires. But the law doesn't state that this return or onward passage must be an airline ticket; it could be anything proving that you leave Peru when the time comes.

When entering the country, Peruvian immigration officials hardly ever ask to see this proof. The ones executing above regulations are usually the airlines. As they could be held responsible and have to fly you back, if denied entry to Peru, most airlines require a return or onward flight ticket to even let you check-in to your flight to Peru.

So, if you plan to come to Peru on a one-way ticket, it’s best to check the requirements of your carrier. Some insist on a flight ticket showing that you leave the country, others accept a reservation for a return flight, a few are happy with a bus ticket and there are as well airlines that let you fly with just a one-way ticket.

If your airline requests a return or onward ticket, you could always make a reservation for one, print the confirmation, and then depending on the agency, you either don't pay it and let it expire or cancel it within a certain time. Other options include buying a fully refundable ticket or, more affordable, "renting" a ticket.

 

Can I work in Peru when on a tourist visa?

No!

A Peruvian tourist visa / temporary authorization for tourists allows entry for touristic, recreational, or health purposes only. Even though there are quite a few foreigners working in Peru for a Peruvian company on a tourist visa, Peruvian law explicitly prohibits to work in Peru for a Peruvian company or to receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru while visiting the country as a tourist.

 

Can I study or do an internship in Peru on a tourist visa?

Generally no, sometimes yes.

For more information, please have a look at our detailed article "Peruvian Student Visa".

Peruvian Student Visa

Peruvian Visa Types
Foreigners planning to study at a Peruvian educational institution or to do an internship / apprenticeship (without payment!) at a Peruvian company...

 

Can I sign legally binding documents in Peru when on a tourist visa?

No!

Before signing a legally binding document (work contract, sworn statements, car or apartment purchase, marriage license, ...) tourists have to apply for a so called "Permiso para firmar contratos". Our article "Permit to sign contracts" explains in detail how it works and what you have to do.

If foreign visitors, who are in Peru as a tourist, or temporary visa holders who haven't applied for a CTM, need to sign a legally binding document...

 

Can I volunteer in Peru when on a tourist visa?

Officially, no! But in reality, it's done all the time. Find more information in our article "Peruvian Volunteer Visa".

While Peru has a volunteer visa, the so-called “visa cooperante” (cooperation visa), getting one is such a bureaucratic mess and in most cases not ...

 

!!! As visa and entry regulations can change quickly without prior notice, we highly recommend confirming current visa requirements with the nearest Peruvian embassy or consulate !!!

Attachments

  • File Description
    File Size
    File Type
    Downloads
  • Visas for Peru by country and allowed length of stay - October 2021
    Who needs a Visa for Peru or not – by country and the allowed length of stay
    181 KB
    640
Say something here...
characters left
or post as a guest
All comments MUST be in English and will be moderated before publishing.
They will appear below within 24 hours.
Loading comment... The comment will be refreshed after 00:00.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bee · 20/11/2023
    Hello,
    The tourist visa is really confusing. In the beginning of this article, you say that now foreigners can stay for only 90 days put of 180 days.
    But later in the article, you mention the new decree published on Nov 14, 2023, which now allows you to stay for 183 days. 
    So what is true?
    Can i stay 183 days in 365 days or its still only 90 days in 180 days?
    Which one of the following is true ?
    1. 90 days in 180 days.
    So lets assume i enter peru on Dec 1. I can stay for 90 days so until feb end 2024. Then i have to leave peru. But i can return after the initial 180 days are over for another 90 days - so with this example i can return for another 90 days after june 2024.
    2. 183 accumulated days in 365 days.
    So i enter peru on dec 1 and i can stay until may end 2024. If i dont get the full 183 days on arrival then i can get an extension and stay until may end 2024. Then i have to leave for 180 days and return for the next 183 days in dec 2024.

    Which is true? I am confused.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 20/11/2023
      @Bee Hello Bee,

      Yes, it is a bit confusing.

      According to the old foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1350), which is mentioned above in the article quite clearly, tourists who can stay in Peru visa-free 183 days in a 365-day period. This was confirmed in the new foreigner law (Decreto Legislativo 1582) a few days ago. So, regarding the general length of stay for tourists per year nothing changed.

      However, this doesn’t mean you get the complete 183 days when you enter the country.

      A publication issued by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE), which is based on agreements Peru has with the different countries, limits or better divides the general 183 days per year allowing most foreign nationals to stay in Peru as a tourist for up to 90 days in a 180-day period.

      Since August 2021, no foreign tourist, who can enter Peru visa-free, was given the full 183 days. The rule for everyone seems to be up to 90 days in a 180-day period. So, when you enter, in most cases you get three months after which you must leave the country and have to stay out of Peru at least three months before re-entering.

      However, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days you are allowed to stay in the country. You are not entitled to get the full 90 days per half year or the full 183 days per year. And depending on the immigration officer and your situation you might (or not) be allowed to re-enter the country before your 180-day period is over, if you haven't stayed the full 183 days per year (not per calendar year but counted from the date you first entered). It's completely up to him or her.

      Additionally, the new Foreigner Law (Decreto Legislativo 1582) seems to allow extensions of tourist visas/stays as a tourist again. But, read the law care fully (see attached screenshot)! It says: in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days when they enter, an extension can be granted until the 183 days are reached, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions. And right now we don't know all the agreements Peru has with all countries and the exact wording.

      So, the only thing we can do at the moment is wait for the Migraciones administrative regulations to be updated according to the new foreigner law and see if this point was made clearer.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Bee · 21/11/2023
      @Sunflower Thanks sunflower. 
      Its still confusing with the extension part. 
      So if i get on entry the full 90 days out of 180 days (lets assume), then can i apply for an extension for another 93 days without leaving the country?
      Its still not clear what this extension means and how it is implemented. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 21/11/2023
      @Bee
      Hello Bee,

      welcome to Peru; things are rarely clear here. Sorry.

      The point is that the modification of the foreigner law was only published a week ago and the authorities have now a certain time (I think it can be anything between one and three months or so) to update the administrative regulations.

      Additionally, I don't know with which countries Peru has agreements regarding stays for tourists and what exactly these agreements state. At least for EU citizens, for example, there is an agreement in place that Peruvians can stay in Schengen States for up to 90 days per half year and Schengen State nationals can stay 90 days per half year in Peru. This could (!) mean, if the agreement wasn't changed recently, that they are excluded from the extension.

      Anyway, I have no idea if similar agreements are in effect for other countries, but assume they are but not sure what they state.

      You might want to check out our Tourist visa extension article where the "history" of tourist visa extension in Peru over the past years is explained in detail. And yes, that is confusing.

      With this being said, right now, no-one can answer if you can extend your stay (exception nationals from member countries of the Andean Community who already now can extend). It will depend on your nationality.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Betty ann · 11/11/2023
    Hello, I’ve been following your site for a very long time! The information you provide is invaluable! God Bless you! I have a question,I’ve been in love with peru for many years, and I usually spend 90 full days in Peru, leave for 90 and come back for 90 and so on, never had any issues. last time I entered peru however was on the 30th of june this year, I stayed for only 40 days, leaving on the 8th of august, I am about to enter again, on the 17th of this month, giving me 50 days left, so, up to the 5th of january of next year… buuuut… my husband pointed out, on the 17th it will be 141 days since my last 180 day period started, so, the question is, if I were to stay, 39 days, instead of 50, leave for one day and come back, could I get the 90 days again? As a new 180 day period will have begun? Thank you so much in advance! God Bless
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 11/11/2023
      @Betty ann
      Hello Betty Ann,

      Thank you so much for your lovely words. You made my day.

      I'm sorry to say, but no-one can answer your question.

      First of all you should be aware that you do not have a right to spend the full 90 days in half a year or the full 183 days in a year. It's always at the discretion of the immigration officer how he/she evaluates your case and how many days he/she is willing to give you.

      In this context, you should as well know that immigration officers usually do not give 39 days or 50 days but in most cases 30, 60 or 90 days.

      Additionally, Migraciones hasn't published how they count the 180-day or 365-day periods in case foreigners visit frequently and there are overlaps.

      With this being said, as you frequently travel to Peru you first might want to check the last 365 days. Assuming at the end of 2022/beginning of 2023 you as well followed your 90 days in, 90 days out routine and you assumingly entered on January 1, 2023, spend 90 days, left and then returned on June 30 (which is exactly the end of your first 180-day period if you entered on January 1), you could spend another 90 days either until December 27 (counted from June 30 plus 180 days) or until the December 31 (counted from the assumed date January 1).

      As you only spend 40 days in this 180-day period, you shouldn't have a problem to re-enter the country on November 17. However, as you are not entitled to spend the full 90 days in half a year you are at the mercy of the immigration officer and things can go in any direction.

      If you are lucky, you will get another 90 days. However, if the immigration officer is doing his/her job by the book you might only get 30 days or perhaps 60. I can't tell you. Over the past year or so there even have been a few cases when the immigration officer told visitors that they are only allowed 90 days in a year (which for most nationalities who can travel to Peru visa-free is wrong) and therefore they already spent all their allowed days in a year and were denied entry.

      So, I know that's not the answer you were hoping for. The only thing you can do is be nice and friendly, hope for the best and come prepared in case the immigration officer gives you trouble. Helpful Decreto Legislativo 1350 article 29.1h (see screenshot attached below) and the list issued by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which states which nationals can stay for how long as a tourist in Peru (just check your nationality).

      And if you plan to continue coming to Peru frequently, no matter how many days you get when you return next week, do not overstay. This will make re-entering in the future even more uncertain.

      All the best.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/11/2023
      @Betty ann
      Hello Betty Ann,

      I might have good news for you that might make it easier for you in the future to come to Peru.

      Today, a new Foreigner Law was published (decreto legislativo 1582, see attached screenshot) allowing extensions again. Migraciones hasn't published the corresponding procedures, but might be worth to check it out.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Betty Ann · 14/11/2023
      @Sunflower Oh my goodness! Thank you for the information! What a wonderful blessing! Thank you Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 15/11/2023
      @Betty Ann
      Hello Betty Ann,

      yes, generally these are good news. I forgot to attach the legal text yesterday (now done), so I recommend to read it carefully.

      It states that foreign tourists can stay in Peru for 183 accumulated days in a 365-day period. However, it further describes that in case foreign tourists don't get the full 183 days, an extension can be granted until the 183 days are reached, unless international agreements or conventions determine a shorter period or don't allow extensions.

      I don't know for which nationalities there are agreements or conventions that might restrict the extension. That's the reason I recommended to look further into the topic depending on your nationality.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Rahul · 08/11/2023
    My name is Rahul. I am currently working in the United States of America and have a H1B Visa and have an Indian Passport (Indian Citizen).
    I am inclined to travel to Peru to do the Machu Picchu hike in July 2024.
    My current H1B Visa stamping is expiring in Aug 2024.
    I have the below questions related to travel to Peru.

    Question 1:
    Should my H1B Visa be valid for 6 months from the date I enter Peru?

    Question 2:
    What are the other alternatives if my H1B Visa expires within a month of my travel to Peru?

    Question 3:
    If I have a valid Canadian Visa (1 need to apply for one) which has a 6 month validity when I travel to Peru from the US, can I make the trip to Peru with a valid Canadian Visa but my H1B expires within 2 months.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 10/11/2023
      @Rahul
      Hello Rahul,

      sorry for getting back to you so late. We had a problem with our comment system, which hopefully is fixed now.

      Honestly, I can't answer your first two questions as the decree allowing Indian passport holders to travel to Peru visa-free only mentions that the Indian passport holder must have permanent (!) residence visa or a visa with a validity of at least (!) 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia. It doesn't state if the visa must still be valid for 6 months when the foreigner enters.

      To not experience any unpleasant surprises I highly recommend getting in contact with a Peruvian consulate to clear this before traveling to Peru.

      If you have a valid permanent residence visa or other visa with a validity of at least 6 months form Canada in your passport, you shouldn't have a problem entering Peru visa-free.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Lina · 24/10/2023
    Hey Eva, thanks so much for all the wonderful Info you are providing here.
    I've been reading through your super helpful comments on here and thought maybe you can help me with my issue.

    2 days ago I tried to enter Peru and was rejected entry for exceeding the days I'm allowed in the country, and was sent back to my country of origin.

    I've spent quite a few months in Peru over the last few years and had to pay an overstay fee twice (14 and 60 soles), the last time being on my last visit, wherein I stayed 93 days.

    On that last visit, I entered on the 2nd of May 2023, and left on the 3rd of August 2023. When I tried to enter Peru 2 days ago, the date was the 21st of October 2023.

    This was my first time entering Peru with my new Dutch passport, and before I've used my Israeli passport.

    Here are my old entries for reference:

    I first entered Peru with my Israeli passport on July 17, 2021, and left on January 17th 2022 (184 days, and never paid an overstating fee, nor is there a stamp on my passport which is probably related to Covid).

    My second time entering Peru, was on April 5th, 2022, and I left on June 28th 2022 (84 days). I only have a stamp
    For coming out, but I believe it's just because they didn't stamp during that period.

    My third time was on October 11th 2022, and I left on December 25th 2022 (76 days). I only got 60 days this time, because I booked a ‘fake’ flight for 60 days later, so ended up paying 60 soles fees when I left.

    My fourth (and last) time entering, was on May 2nd 2023 and left on August 3rd, 2023 (93 days, Payd 14 or so soles for overstay).
    This was the first time I had used my new Dutch passport.

    As far as I understand, with my Dutch passport, I'm allowed to be in Peru for 90 days every 180 days, starting from when I first entered (so in this example, starting from May 2nd, assuming they are counting from the first time I entered with this current passport).

    If that is the case, and considering I should stay out of Peru for 90 days after my exit, I should be allowed back in from November 1st (or October 29th if I'm calculating 180 days from May 2nd.)

    Does that sound right to you?
    Do you think that my odds are pretty good to enter then?

    And what do you think about using my Isreali passport which hasn't been used since I left in December?

    I've called the migration agency and the lady didn't really give me a clear answer for when I can come back with my Dutch passport. She mentioned that I might not be able to come back until next year but it seems like she was guessing more than anything, and mentioned that I could call again and maybe the data shown to her would be different. From what I understood from the conversation, it seems that the computer could tell her that I'm not allowed to be back at the moment, but didn't give her the next possible date.

    I need to be back in Peru as soon as possible for personal reasons but I'm also worried about facing the same issue again and being forced back to my country, which will mean more money going to waste.

    I'm currently planning on flying to Bolivia and entering through the land border near La Paz, since I know the migration officer can have an impact on my chance to enter so I figured flying through Lima after being denied there just a few days ago won't be a good idea.

    Another thing that I'm wondering about, is the 2 passports situation; 

    1. Is my first entry date for my Dutch passport definitely the first time I used it to enter or could it be the same as my other passport?
    2. Are they able to see right away that I'm the same person who tried to come in a few days ago if I try again with a different passport?
    3. Could it be a crime to try entering with a second passport after trying with the first one and getting rejected?

    Thanks so much for taking the time to read through all of this :) I would appreciate any feedback you might have!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 25/10/2023
      @Lina Hello Lina,

      Thank for your nice works. It’s always great to hear that the information we provide here on LimaEasy is helpful.

      As you seem to have understood the general rules abut being in Peru as a tourist here just a short summary. In general, tourists are allowed to stay in Peru for up to 183 days per year according to the Foreigner Law, Decreto Legislativo 1350 article 29, 1 h (see attached picture, might be wise to print it and take it with you when you try to re-enter the next time). A publication of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs limits or better divides these 183 days for Israelis and the Dutch in 90 days in a 180-day period (see second picture attached).

      Nevertheless, foreigners don’t have the right to get the full 90 days in half a year or the full 183 days per year. It’s always up to the immigration officer you have to face if you are allowed to enter and how many days you get. You are completely at his/her mercy. And, while many are quite relaxed, over the last year or so there seem to be two or three immigration officers at the airport in Lima that are extremely strict, don’t seem to know how to calculate or read their system and regularly deny entry to foreigners (especially to those who have been to Peru a few times before or enter-stay short periods of time-leave-reenter after a bit) telling them they already used all their days, even if they haven’t.

      And it does not surprise me that Migraciones couldn’t help you or give you a clear answer. I can neither, because there isn’t one or correctly, Migraciones hasn’t published any information about how exactly the 180-day periods and 365-day periods are calculated, especially if there are overlaps / foreigners entering before their 180/365-day period is over and how overstaying effects the calculation. And as stated many times before, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer, so no-one can tell you at what date you can re-enter without having any problems or how many days you will get.

      Another point is your two passports. I don’t know if Migraciones can now link two passports to one a person. For many, many years foreigners with two passports would alternate between their passports when entering Peru and never had a problem, some even did this for years living in Peru. So, if you enter Peru on your Dutch passport, I doubt but honestly don’t know for sure if they can even see your past entries with the Israeli passport.

      So, below my view on things that might help you get another perspective and might give you some arguments, if necessary, when you try to re-enter.

      When you stayed in Peru from July 17, 2021 to January 17, 2022 (184 days), you stayed already the time allowed for a whole year. But there was an amnesty in place due to Covid, so no overstay fine and even the number of days should have been waved.

      April 5th, 2022 to June 28th, 2022 (84 days): you didn’t get an entry stamp, because during Covid stamping of passports was eliminated and just reintroduced in May 2022, so therefore you got an exit stamp. Number of days you stayed are fine.

      October 11th, 2022 to December 25th 2022 (76 days): you only got 60 days and overstayed just a bit over two weeks, which shouldn’t be a problem anymore as in the 365-day period from April 5, 2022 to April 5, 2023 you only stayed 160 days (84+76).

      Overall, assuming that Migraciones doesn’t link you (person with Israeli passport) to your Dutch passport, you should have been able to re-enter the country on your Israeli passport after April 5, 2023. So, if you try to re-enter today with your Israeli passport, I assume you shouldn’t have a problem.

      May 2nd, 2023 to August 3rd, 2023 (93 days): you entered for the first time with your Dutch passport (and even could have entered with your Israeli passport). Overstayed three days, shouldn’t be a big deal.

      I assume (!) on May 2nd a new 365-day period started (either because they can’t link you to your Israeli passport and you entered for the first time or even if, the last 365-day period on your Israeli passport ended April 5, so you should be fine to re-enter again).

      The 180-day period starting May 2, ends on October 29, so add a few days because you overstayed, in my opinion (!) you should be able to enter on your Dutch passport without having any problems at the beginning of November.

      With this being said, I really wonder why the immigration officer refused to let you enter on your Dutch passport on October 21. Yes, your 180-day period wasn’t over, but usually, as you haven’t spent 183 days in the past year on your Dutch passport, they just give you a verbal warning and then anything up to 90 days.

      And even if they can see that you have been to Peru before on another passport and even if they add the stay from your Israeli passport and your Dutch passport, I don’t see that you exceeded your allowed days and shouldn’t have a problem to re-enter at the beginning of November on either passport. And no, it’s not a crime to enter Peru one time with passport 1 and the next time with passport 2. The big question is, if immigration is able to link the two different passports with one person and then, of course, add the days.

      So, I’m really sorry, that I can’t give you the clear answer you were looking for. And you are right crossing at a land border might be a better option (I don’t know if they put your denied entry into the system). Nevertheless, prepare yourself, just in case. Decide on which passport you want to enter Peru and then list your entries, exits and days spent, print out the two pics attached below. And then, if necessary, have a nice chat with the immigration officer. Personally, I wouldn’t mention the other passport. If you are denied entry again (which I don’t believe), remain friendly, ask why, get your list and print outs out, plead your case and let the officer explain why you exceeded your number of days (then you will know for sure, if he/she can see your entries on the other passport). Then hope for the best.

      I wish you good luck.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Lina · 25/10/2023
      @Sunflower Wow. thank you so much for all this info! I honestly wish they had someone in the migration office who is even half as helpful as you. Your answers on here are brilliant. Thanks again!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 25/10/2023
      @Lina
      You are more than welcome.

      I came to Peru nearly 20 years ago and back then Migraciones was a mess and absolutely horrible to deal with; yes, even worse than today. No information about anything anywhere, no-one there could or wanted to answer questions / explain how things work. One day you were told bring document x and when you returned with it, they would say, but document y is missing. Even an immigration lawyer we hired and a tramitador weren't helpful, took our money and then did nothing/disappeared. It was a nightmare and for nearly 2 years my Peruvian husband and I went through hell and back until I finally had my residence visa.

      Anyway, back then I decided to share my knowledge about how Peruvian bureaucracy and Migraciones work/think, so others don't have to go through the same. I'm not an immigration lawyer or tramitador, but I try to keep as up-to-date as possible and try to explain the sometimes complicated and complex contexts as simply as possible hopefully helping others.

      And one thing you should keep in mind: some Migraciones staff (including at the airport) seem to lack training and don't know their own laws and regulations. And it seems sometimes there are no clear answers. So, it might be wise that you as a foreigner exactly know your rights and obligations and friendly, but firmly use this knowledge if and where necessary.

      I really wish everything works out for you

      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Rob · 17/08/2023
    Hello, 

    I'm trying to figure out what exactly is allowed under a tourist visa and can't see additional information on any website. 

    Can you attend business meetings / conferences? Any sign posting would be helpful. 

    Thanks!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/08/2023
      @Rob
      Hello Rob,

      not really sure what you are expecting and what additional information you are looking for. 

      As described above, foreigners can enter Peru as a tourist for touristic, recreational or health purposes. Attending business meetings or conference usually requires a business visa.

      Greetings
      Eva

  • This commment is unpublished.
    Steven · 17/08/2023
    I entered through immigration today, and they informed me that US citizens are only allowed to stay in the country for 90 days per year. They’ve adopted a completely digital system now without stamping passports. Seems as though in the system I was flagged because I’ve stayed more than 90 days already. They allowed me to stay for two more weeks, but he basically told me the next time I come here they most likely will not let me re-enter. They recommended I go to the embassy and could easily apply to stay longer but I’m wondering what type of visa I can get to stay longer. I don’t plan on working here or volunteering here and I wasn’t planning to get married to a Peruvian for at least another few months.. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/08/2023
      @Steven Hello Steven,

      Yes, as described above in the article the whole immigration process is digitalized now and stamping of passports was eliminated in May 2023 when entering Peru at Jorge Chavez International Airport.

      Additionally, over the past year I heard from a few of our readers (and read on social media) that "according to some new law" or "according to some immigration officer" US passport holders are only allowed to stay as a tourist for up to 90 days per year. At least until now I couldn't find anything official in writing confirming this; no new law, no new regulation and no change of current laws, regulations and publications that stipulate this.

      The rules are still the same. According to the Peruvian Foreigner Law, Decreto Supremo 1350 foreigners can stay in Peru as a tourist for 183 days per year. See Titulo IV, Capitulo I, article 29 h on page 60 of the document or screenshot below. However, already in June 2019, a publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) limited or better divided the general 183 day per year to 90 days in a 180-day period.

      So today, most nationalities who can travel to Peru visa-free, can stay 90 days in half a year. If you check the RREE publication under North America and United States it says 90 days (see on the Peruvian government website or screenshot below) Unfortunately, it doesn't say 90 days in a 180-day period but as well not 90 days in a 365-day period. But practice has shown that US passport holders can stay in Peru as a tourist for up to 90 days in a 180-day period and 180 days per year.

      But no matter what any rule or regulation says, it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer you have to face if he/she allows you to enter, how he/she evaluates your case, and how long he/she allows you to stay. You are not entitled to get the full 90 days per half year or the full 183 days per year. 

      And, if you already stayed 90 days over the past six months or your max allowed 180 days over the past year, then you might not be allowed to enter or only get a few days. And if you overstayed your time in Peru before, then this will come up when your passport is checked and the immigration officer will evaluate your case differently.

      Anyway, not knowing your circumstances, it's difficult to give advice. First of all, I don’t know why the immigration officer told you to go to the embassy. Sorry, they can’t do anything for you. Already since August 2021, Peruvian consulates do not issue temporary or residence visas (except for tourism and business) anymore. 

      So, if you plan to stay in Peru for over 183 days per year in the future, then you should apply for a residence visa, and this is done at Migraciones in Peru. But the options Peru offers don't seem to fit your lifestyle (family, work, student, religious, investment, retirement…) and honestly, I have no clue what the immigration officer meant when telling you that it's easy to apply for a visa allowing you to stay longer, because each visa has certain requirements that you must fulfill, which you seemingly cannot.

      Another option could be to apply for the Permiso temporal de permanencia. It’s a temporary permit of residence allowing foreigners, who overstayed their time as a tourist in Peru to regularize their stay in the country and become legal. It’s really easy to get, valid for one year (after that you must either leave Peru or apply for a “real” residence visa) and you even can work when you have it. But one huge limitation is that you can only leave Peru with a special travel permit allowing you to be outside Peru for a max of 30 days, and you can only apply for it three times. So, not sure if this could be an option for you.

      Honestly, without knowing more about your circumstances, the easiest would be to marry. But this is a process taking a few months and you must be legal in Peru to get married, get your marriage certificate and change your immigration status to, so apply for, a family visa.

      Greetings
      Eva

    • This commment is unpublished.
      steven · 17/08/2023
      @Sunflower Thanks for your quick replay and for your patience, I know you get a lot of repeat questions/scenarios. 

      A little more info, if we start the day count on January 1st. I was here for 56 form Jan-Jun and so from July to now I have been here 6 days. a total of 70 days

      If we are doing a calendar year based on 1st Entry  Sep 4th 2022.  Then I have been here 116 day and never going over 58 days in a 180 day period. 

      Are they possible counting days that I have been giving for each entry visa instead of how many actually days I have been here?  

      Do you advise printing that document to show the officer or that will just make things worse?  I guess If I am on a Sep-4th to Sep 4th calendar then things are about to rest and give me a new 90 days? After this trip I don't plan to return till Sep 20th.

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/08/2023
      @steven
      Peru doesn't count in calendar years, but in 180-day periods or 365-day periods. A 180-day period isn't from January to June or from July to December and the 365-day period isn't from January to December. The period starts on the day of your first entry.

      And no, only the days you actually stay in Peru are counted. You might want to check you TAM virtual to see if all entries and exits are registered correctly.

      I know from quite a number of US nationals who stay in Peru as a tourist for two times 90 days without any problems. Until now I couldn't find out the reason why some US nationals, and here especially those who regularly enter, stay for a few weeks, leave and re-enter, are told that they can only stay 90 days per year. 

      I spent hours searching the internet for anything confirming this; in vain. I even got in contact with Migraciones in Peru and the General Consulate of Peru in Washington DC, both confirming that US nationals can stay up to a combined 180 days per year.

      So, honestly I don't know what's going on. And as it's always up to the immigration officer there is really nothing I can do to clear up the situation. Sorry.

      Anyway, if you entered for the first time on September 4, 2022, leave latest September 3, 2023 and haven't spent more than 180 days over this time, then when you enter Peru on September 20, 2023 a new 365-day period should start and you should be able to get another 90 days. But, as you were "warned" when you entered this time, I would come prepared.

      Either have the stuff on your phone or print the article from the foreigner law and the RREE publication out. Additionally, I would get in contact with Migraciones (best use the chat on the Agencia Digital) and ask there how many days US nationals can stay in Peru as a tourist. As I just did that a few months ago, I'm sure you are told 180 or 183 days. Write down the date and name of the person you spoke to. Then I would contact a Peruvian consulate in the States by e-mail as well asking how long US nationals can stay in Peru as a tourist. Here as well, as I just did that a few months ago, I'm sure you get the same answer I did and that was 180  days per year. Print out the answer. In case the immigration officer gives you trouble again when you re-enter, I would show them your printouts and ask where you can find that US nationals can only stay 90 days per year as Migraciones, the consulate and official publications all say 180 days per year.

      Having this conversation with an immigration officer is a balancing act as you are completely at his/her mercy. So, proceed with caution, be super friendly and respectful, tell them why you visit Peru frequently (girlfriend/fiancé) and ask for help understanding the rules and regulations so you can be united with your girlfriend for as long as possible.

      Greetings
      Eva


    • This commment is unpublished.
      JB · 22/09/2023
      @Sunflower
      Hi Eva

      I was wanting to apply for "Permiso temporal de permanencia" to stay 1 year in Peru. On the link above it states "Quienes se encuentren en situación migratoria irregular [1] a la fecha de entrada en vigencia de la presente resolución, es decir hasta el 10 de mayo de 2023:". Does this mean that if I entered in July 2023 this is no option for me? Is this strictly enforced? Or can anyone do it before it expires on 10 November?

      Thank you
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/09/2023
      @JB
      Hello JB,

      Unfortunately, the law is clear. You must have been in the country on an expired stay already on May 23, 2023 to be eligible for the permiso temporal de permanencia. As far as I know, yes this is enforced.

      However, the permiso temporal de permanencia isn't really new, it was first introduced in October 2020 for only half a year and then extended, extended,  extended again and again and again. Officially the permiso option ends in November, but there is always a chance that it is extended once more or, as over the past two decades there have been numerous similar programs, another option could be given to foreigners who are in Peru on an expired stay as a tourist to regularize their immigration status. Nobody can tell you.

      But if you entered in July and got 90 days then your stay as a tourist ends in October. Despite the May 23 rule, you could still apply for the permiso temporal de permanencia and see what happens. If you are lucky, you are approved. If not, then you get a few days/weeks/months (depending on how quick Migraciones decides) extra stay in Peru (once you applied your time as a tourist stops) and after your application is dismissed you are asked to leave the country.

      Greetings
      Eva


  • This commment is unpublished.
    Nathan · 28/07/2023
    Hello, 

    I had a question if you didn’t mind. Long story short, I have entered Peru 7 times total since December 2021 and I normally use all of my 180 days a day here.

    I am a U.S. citizen and some websites say US passport holders can enter 180 days out of a 365 day time period and others 90 out of 180 days. The first time I entered Peru was December 12, 2021 and I stayed for 3 months, went back to the US for 2 months, then stayed another 2 months in Peru so I was here 120 days out of 180 days and had no problems at all.

    My new 180 days a year started on December 13th of 2022. I stayed here in Peru for 87 days then went back to the US then returned again 7 days before my 180 day mark from December 13, 2022. The migration officer told me that I only had one week here since I already used 83 out of the 180 days but she told me I am welcome to stay up to 90 days and pay the extra 72 days that I will be “overstaying” whenever I leave in August. After I went passed security, the migration supervisor apologized to me on her behalf and told me it’s not 90 out of 180 days but 180 out of 365 days for me since I’m a U.S. citizen. 

    My question is, when I leave Peru next month, will I need to pay for “overstaying” even when I am able to stay here for 180 days a year? Last year I stayed for 120 days in a 180 day time period and was completely fine, no questions asked but what the migration officer told me worried me since I always want to do things the right way. Also, even when I leave Peru, I will have only stayed around 160 days out of the 180 days I’m allowed per year so how would that be overstaying? 

    I understand people who stay over 183 days a year paying for over staying but mine will still be 3 weeks short of that. They also didn’t stamp my passport upon entry in June so I have no idea. If I do have to pay if this done when you’re at migrations leaving? And will I allowed back in in October for 20 days if they think I overstayed since it’s a new 180 day period? Thank you so much!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/07/2023
      @Nathan Hello Nathan,

      According to the Peruvian foreigner law, Decreto Supremo 1350, in general, foreigners can stay in Peru as a tourist for 183 days per year. What many sources, including some official ones, don’t mention is that a publication by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs limits or better divides these 183 days. US American passport holders as well as most other foreigners, who can travel to Peru visa-free, can be in Peru for 90 days in a 180-day period. As two times 90 days in two 180-day periods nearly equals the 183days in a year, there is no contradiction.

      However, be aware that you don’t have a right to get the full 90 days or the full 183 days. It’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer if he/she let’s you enter the country and how many days he/she is willing to give you. Since Agust 2021, the maximum tourists get when entering the country is 90 days. But even if you’ve never been to Peru before, the immigration officer could just allow you to stay for a week or a month. It’s completely up to him/her.

      Or if you already stayed 90 days in a 180-day period, leave the country and return before your 180-day period is over, it depends on the immigration and how he/she evaluates the situation. If he/she is doing his/her job by the book, you either won’t be allowed to enter or only get a week or month. Another immigration officer, however, evaluates the situation differently saying you haven’t stayed the full 183 days allowed per year and gives you another 60 days or 90 days.

      No matter what any law or regulation says, the one in charge is the immigration officer and what he/she says and puts in the Migraciones data base counts.

      And yes, stamping of passports was eliminated at the end of May 2023. The only way to confirm the number of days you got is checking online on the Migraciones website.

      In case you get an error message and aren’t shown your entry, check out our article How many days did I get when entering Peru? There you find a detailed explanation about the topic including other ways to find out how many days you were given.

      So, check your TAM virtual and see how many days you got when you entered on June 4 (hope my math is correct). Anyway, if you only got the 7 days, then you should have left on June 11. As you haven’t left, you are now “illegally”, the Peruvians call it irregular, in the country. And while this usually doesn’t have any severe consequences, there could be inconveniences or problems later as your overstaying is now registered in the Migraciones database. Especially if you come to Peru regularly and try to spend the maximum time allowed, it is not wise to overstay.

      Anyway, when you leave, you will have to pay the overstay fine of S/ 4.95 per day you stayed after June 11. You can pay the fine at the airport (the counter is located just opposite the immigration counters) or before you leave at a Banco de la Nacion branch or on pagalo.pe. Our article Peruvian overstay fine for tourists explains in detail everything you should know about overstaying including the consequences, where and how to pay as well as when you can return to Peru after having overstayed.

      And no-one can guarantee you that you will be allowed to re-enter in October. As explained before it’s always up to the immigration officer. Nevertheless, denying foreigners to come back to Peru is rare, but it happens especially to those who overstayed their time in Peru before and who end up at a counter with an immigration officer doing his/her job by the book.

      Wishing you all the best

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Pradeep Kulkarni · 17/07/2023
    Hello
    I am Indian citizen working in United Arab Emirates. I have B1/B2 USA visa valid till 2031.
    I wish to visit Peru in June 2024. Do I need a separate tourist visa for Peru ? or can I get on arrival ?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/07/2023
      @Pradeep Kulkarni
      Hello Pradeep,

      I'm not really familiar with the different US visas, but when I remember correctly the B1/B2 USA visa is a temporary (!) tourist-business visa combination valid for 10 years, however allowing its holder to stay in the US for a maximum of 6 months at a time.

      According to a supreme decree from March 2017 only those Indian citizens, who have a permanent residency or a visa with a validity of at least 6 months for the USA, Canada, any country belonging to the Schengen area, UK or Australia can travel to Peru visa-free.

      So, I think you must apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian consulate before coming to Peru.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Abiodun · 08/07/2023
    Hello Lima,
    I'm from Nigeria and a passport holder, I want to visit Peru for tourism on a short visit to meet my family, I have been finding it difficult on how to apply for the visa and the right immigration website to apply for Peru visa. I will be glad if you can help. Thanks.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/07/2023
      @Abiodun Hello Abiodun,

      I moved your comment from our Health Declaration page, where you posted, to our Tourist Visa article as here above you find lots of useful information about the tourist visa including the requirements you have to fulfill; especially interesting for you probably the chapter How and where to apply for a Peruvian tourist visa.

      As Nigerian passport holder you must apply for a tourist visa before you can come to Peru. This has to be done at a Peruvian consulate (you can't apply for a Peruvian tourist visa online). Unfortunately there is no Peruvian consulate in Nigeria. The Peruvian consulate, who is in charge in your case, is the one in Accra, Ghana.

      While above in our article you find the general requirements, best get in contact with the consulate in Accra, ask for the exact requirements and their application process. The contact details for the Peruvian consulate in Accra are

      Address: Plot 16, First Circular Road, Cantonments, Accra
      Phone: (+233) 237463912
      Email: egaviria@rree.gob.pe

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Rebecca Wingar · 29/06/2023
    Hi Eva, 

    Thank you for such an informative website - it is proving to be really helpful!
    I am planning a trip to south America - flying to Lima next week. I plan to spend a few weeks in Peru with my boyfriend who will then return home and I will fly to Ecuador to meet with a friend. After having spent around 4 weeks in Ecuador we plan to travel back to Peru where we will continue to explore. 

    My question is that will I be allowed to exit and re-enter the country. 
    Also if I am granted 90 days tourism in Peru, does this run continually from my entry point? Ie July to September. Or if I spend 30days in Peru in July, 30 days in Ecuador in August would I still have 60days left to spend in Peru on my return? 

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

    Many Thanks, 

    Rebecca 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/06/2023
      @Rebecca Wingar Hello Rebecca,

      Yes, you will be allowed to exit Peru and re-enter after your time in Ecuador.

      When you enter Peru in July you get up to 90 days. Be aware that is always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days he allows you to stay as a tourist. You don’t have the right to stay the full 90 days in Peru.

      Anyway, when you enter Peru you won’t get an entry stamp anymore, but in case of foreigners who don’t have to apply for a “real” tourist visa a “single-entry authorization to stay in Peru as a tourist for a certain time” which is nothing more than an entry in the Migraciones database. If necessary, you can check this entry by looking up your TAM virtual. How it’s done is explained in our article How many days did I get.

      Let’s assume you get 90 days when you enter Peru. In case you leave after 30 days your “authorization to stay in Peru as a tourist for a certain time “/TAM virtual is canceled and the remaining 60 days are “gone”.

      When you return a month or so later you get a new “authorization to stay in Peru as a tourist for a certain time “/TAM virtual. And here again it’s completely up to the immigration officer how many days you get. You are not entitled to get the “remaining” 60 days. The immigration officer could only give you 30 days, or he/she allows you 60 days or even another full 90 days, the latter because you haven’t stayed the max allowed time of 183 days per year.

      It seems complicated, but if you haven’t been to Peru over the last year or haven’t overstayed your time in the country, you shouldn’t have a problem to get at least 30 days when you enter (most probably more) and, if you only stayed 30 days, another 60 days when you return.

      Have a great trip and enjoy your time

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Cook · 19/06/2023
    Hi - do you know how the Peru immigration team count days?

    E.g. if you entered on 6th June and were given 30day visa on arrival, what is the latest day you can leave?

    I would count 30days from 6 June to be 6th July. But do they count the day of entry (6 June) as Day 1? or Day 0?

    Will an exit flight of 6th July be a problem / count as a 1 day overstay?

    Thanks!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 20/06/2023
      @Cook
      Hello Cook,

      officially, the day you enter Peru is day 1, no matter if it's 00.01am or 11.59pm.

      But practice has shown that Migraciones usually counts it as day 0.

      So, if you entered on June 6 and leave on July 6 you shouldn´t be considered having overstayed one day and shouldn't have any problem.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Madi · 07/06/2023
    Hello, 

    I would like some clarification on the recent article concerning the days you're allowed to stay in Peru on a tourist visa. At the beginning of the year, the law stated you're allowed 180 days per year in Peru. I entered Peru on January 07th, 2023 and left on March 26th for Brazil. I returned to Peru two weeks after. However, when I returned to Peru, the immigration officer said the law changed to only 90 days per year, therefore, the officer only give me the remaining days I had left out of the 90 days. But, 2 weeks after I saw the law changed again, (LEY # 31731, April, 27th, 2023) where you are allowed 180 days per year. My question is, do I have to pay the overstay fee or will it be waived because I did not stay over 180 days? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 07/06/2023
      @Madi Hello Madi,

      There have been rumors, especially on social media, for at least a year now that foreigners who can travel to Peru visa-free “according to some new law” or "according to some immigration officer" are only allowed to stay as a tourist for up to 90 days per year. At least until now I couldn’t find anything official in writing; no new law, no new regulation or no change of current laws, regulations and publications that stipulate this.

      So, I was happy that someone, you, finally mentioned the “new law” with a number.

      But are you sure it’s Ley 31731 from April 27, 2023? Have you read the law? Honestly, I never heard of it before, and checked Peru’s official gazette, El Peruano, for it. Yes, there is a Ley 31731 published on April 27, 2023, but it surely has nothing to do with how long tourists can stay in Peru. The law allows the expropriation of the property with code Nº 05_UC_271005 for the execution of the Acai-Bella Union II, stage project construction of the Iruro Dam. (see screenshot attached below).

      With this being said, even though I try to stay as up-to-date as possible, but still might have missed something, I don’t know of any changes regarding the number of days foreigners are allowed to stay in Peru as a tourist.

      Decreto Legislativo 1350 (Peru’s foreigner law) states that in general foreigners can stay a max (!!!) of 183 days per year. A publication of the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs shows which nationalities must apply for a tourist visa and which don’t and how long they can stay in Peru. Most nationalities who can travel to Peru visa-free are still welcome for up to (!!!) 90 days in a 180-day period.

      However, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days you are allowed to stay in the country. You are not entitled to get the full 90 days per half year or the full 183 days per year.

      And to answer your question: the “supreme authority” is the immigration officer, no matter the maximum allowed days a foreigner can stay as a tourist according to the law. So, if he/she only gave you, for example, 10 days, then you only can stay 10 days. If you don´t leave after these 10 days, yes, you have to pay the overstay fine for each day you stayed longer. In 2023, the fine is S/ 4.95 per day you overstayed.

      Greetings
      Eva

      Edit: I just had another idea: Did you probably mean Ley 31732 , the amnistia de multa a las personas extranjeras? This law does not apply to tourists only to foreigners residing in Peru who didn't, for example, extend their residence visa in time. (see second screenshot). Tourist who overstayed still have to pay the overstay fine.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Madi · 08/06/2023
      @Sunflower Hey Eva, thank you so much for your response. 
      This brings a lot of clarity to the situation. 

      I would like to find out the process of paying the overstay fine at the airport. 
      Is the counter open 24/7 for international flights that are leaving early morning and late at night. 
      What is the best form of payment that is applicable? 
      If it's cash should it be US or Soles? Also should we have the exact amount of cash or do they give change? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/06/2023
      @Madi
      Hello Madi,

      You can pay the overstay fine at the airport or using pagalo.pe.

      The counter at the Jorge Chavez International Airport is open as long as international flights depart.

      While for years only cash payments in Soles or US$ (the exchange rate is miserable, so best have enough Soles on hand) were accepted, one of our readers informed us that at least since August 2022 additionally credit card payments are an option as well.

      The process is explained in detail in our article Peruvian overstay fine for tourists and specifically under point How and where to pay the overstay fine.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    daniel · 29/05/2023
    hi again,

    since i really fell in love with peru,and there is still so much to explore,iam planning another trip november 1st 2023 ! the thing is that i wanna fly back from lima on lets say march 1st 2024!
    so its 4month total!

     i also wanna see ecuador for 2-3weeks! 
    so my idea is to lets say go to ecuador or maybe even colombia after 80days of peru

    stay there for 2weeks or even 1month but then return to peru! (not sure if by air or land)
    because my return flight will be from lima !


    as i understood,there is no guarantee if and how many days i will receive from the immigration officer when trying to re enter peru!
    but i think i rather wanna try this option then "overstaying" !

    could it be a problem that they wouldnt let me back into peru
    even if i would show a return ticket from lima!?

    hope to hear from you!
    lovely greetings

    daniel




    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/05/2023
      @daniel
      Hello Daniel,

      as you already said, there is no guarantee how many days you will get when you enter Peru in November and when you return to Peru after your short trip to Ecuador. You are not entitled to get the full 90 days or stay the full 183 days per year. So, no-one can tell you what will happen as it's always at the discretion of the immigration officer.

      Additionally, it seems that you have been in Peru before. Depending on when this was, be aware that the max number of days you can stay in Peru per year (not per calendar year, but counted from your first entry) is 183 days.

      With this being said, if you haven't overstayed in Peru before and have been outside Peru for at least 3 months, you should be able to get 90 days when you enter in November. If not, best ask friendly for it, if necessary schmoozing the immigration officer a bit.

      Personally, I think it's a wise decision to not overstay and leave Peru before your 90 days are up. Furthermore, even though there is always a slight possibility that the immigration officer won't let you re-enter, if you haven't overstayed before and if you haven't already stayed the max of 183 days per year, you should at least get another 30 days, especially as you can show a flight ticket out of the country on a certain date.

      Have a nice trip to Peru and enjoy your time.

      Greetings
      Eva

    • This commment is unpublished.
      daniel · 30/05/2023
      @Sunflower hi Eva and thx for the fast reply!

      yes i have been to peru twice now! and there is always a break of at least
      8-9month until i ll come back,but now i ll prefer more then 3month ! ;)

      have a good evening

      Daniel :)


    • This commment is unpublished.
      daniel · 23/07/2023
      @Sunflower hello again,
      this time i need to buy a flight ticket which is covering my 4month!
      in the past 2 visits i always had my roundticket 90days max.
      actually they never checked if i have had a return ticket! 

      but of course i always do have a return flight...
      the only concern iam having this time
      is that my return ticket wont be within the 90days (3month)

      iam  planning on flying in and out from lima!
      do you think if they gonna check,they could give me some trouble?

      lovely greetings again

      daniel

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/07/2023
      @daniel Hello Daniel,

      Peruvian law requires that foreign visitors must have a return or onward passage out of the country if they aren't residents, proving that they leave the country when the visa or temporary authorization to enter expires.

      However, when entering the country, Peruvian immigration officials hardly ever ask to see this proof. The ones executing above regulations are usually the airlines.

      Honestly, in case the airline (rather likely) or immigrations in Peru (rather unlikely) asks for your return ticket, I don't think that you will have a problem when it shows a return 4 months later and won't bother. And if, you can always tell them that you are spending some time in Ecuador and return to Peru to fly home again.

      Greetings
      Eva 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      daniel · 24/07/2023
      @Sunflower hi eva,
      i really appreciate you fast and detailed responds,thx!
      yeah i agree,i hope it will all work out! 
      airlines like klm for example do sell tickets within a period of  4month or even 6month,so i dont think there will be a problem! but you never know ;)

      greetings,
      daniel
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Joe · 22/03/2023
    I have a question: I am planning a trip to Peru and Ecuador in the same trip. Would that cause complications?

    Fly into Lima- fly to Quito- Fly back to Lima then Fly back to the United States.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/03/2023
      @Joe
      Hello Joe,

      assuming you are a US passport holder, I don't see any reason to worry or any complications. You can enter both Peru and Ecuador as a tourist visa-free.

      You can stay in Peru for up to 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days per year as a tourist, and I think in Ecuador up to 90 days in a year. If you don't plan to exceed these amount of days and there is nothing I'm not aware of you are fine.

      Additionally, both countries eliminated all Covid entry requirements last year.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Nick · 24/02/2023
    Thanks for a useful article.
    I entered Peru for the first time a month ago, I hold a New Zealand passport, on my entry stamp it says 90 days, now I need to enter Ecuador for a few days and back again for business matter. My question is can I enter normally since I used only 30 days from my 90 days in 180 rule or since the visa officer wrote 90 days on my visa it's counted as using them although I stayed only 1 month?
    Thanks 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 24/02/2023
      @Nick Hello Nick,

      when you entered Peru the immigration officer gave you 90 days. So, you are allowed to be in the country for 3 months starting from the day you first came to Peru. In case you leave before these 90 days are over, your “authorization to stay as a tourist” (nothing more than the entry stamp in your passport and an entry in the Migraciones database) is canceled and the remaining days expire.

      When you re-enter the country, you will get a new “authorization to stay as a tourist”. And it’s at the discretion of the immigration officer how many days he/she gives you. As you are allowed up to 90 days in a 180-day period and only stayed 30 of it, you should get at least the remaining 60 days or as you haven’t stayed the full 183 days per year perhaps even another 90 days; or just 30 days or whatever the immigration officer gives you, nobody can tell you. Be aware you don’t have the right to get the remaining 60 days or any number of days; it’s completely up to the immigration officer.

      Greetings
      Eva

Peru Newsflash

Peru Event Calendar

Latest Content...

Latest Video

Maria Reiche - Memories

Maria Reiche - Memories

Submitted by: Tintin
05 December 2021

Long Reads...

  • Peruvian Archaeology

    The Mystery of the Nazca Lines in Peru

    In the 1920s, when people first flew across southern Peru, they made an astonishing discovery. Stretching below them,…
  • Peruvian Personalities & Founders

    Francisco Pizarro González (1474-1541)

    Francisco Pizarro, a peasant from Spain, was one of the least well-equipped conquerors in history. However, in the name…
  • Peruvian Archaeology

    The colorful Fabrics and Textiles of Peru

    Europe’s first knowledge of Peruvian textiles was acquired following the Spanish invasion of Peru in 1532, when the…
  • Peruvian Legends, Myths & Tales

    The Jeweled Frog and the Condor

    By a quiet pond, at the side of a cloud-topped mountain in Peru, lived a small green frog and his large green family.…
  • Peru Info

    Peruvian Economy

    The Peruvian economy is an emerging, social market economy highly dependent on foreign trade and classified as an upper…