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Peruvian Retirement Visa

Peruvian Retirement Visa

A Guide to Peruvian Visas

Part 7

Retirees and pensioners who receive a state or private pension or other benefits (for example a disability pension) of at least US$ 1000 per month or the equivalent in any other currency can apply for a permanent residency in Peru called Rentista Visa.

For each dependent (such as a spouse) who should be included in the visa, the proof of an additional US$ 500 is required.

Please be aware that you are not allowed to work or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru when living in the country on a retirement visa.

Content overview

 

Legal background for a retirement visa application in Peru

Officially, you can apply for a retirement visa at a Peruvian consulate abroad or at Migraciones in Peru. However, since August 2021, an increasing number of Peruvian diplomatic missions abroad don't issue resident visas anymore.

So, retirees enter the country as a tourist and then change their immigration status - make a so called Cambio de calidad migratoria (as opposed to a Solicitud de calidad migratoria at a consulate) - at Migraciones.

For foreigners planning to stay longer in Peru and to apply for a resident visa, the most important laws and regulations are the Decreto Legislativo 1350 (which only stipulates general rules), the Decreto Supremo 002-2021-IN and the TUPA. Helpful as well is to check out the Peruvian government website. All these documents are, of course, in Spanish.

While below under "Requirements for a retirement visa application in Peru" you find the necessary documents described in English, the official list of requirements (in Spanish) can be found, for example, in the Decreto Supremo 002-2021-IN on page 46 in article 92-A “Procedimiento administrative de solicitud de calidad migratoria rentista residente” (when applying at a Peruvian consulate) or in article 92-B “Procedimiento administrative de cambio de calidad migratoria rentista residente” (when applying in Peru).

If you prefer to check out the TUPA you find the information on page 153 under "Procedimiento Administrativo "Cambio de Calidad Migratoria Rentista Residente".

 

Requirements for a retirement visa application in Peru

Below you find the requirements to apply for a retirement visa, accurately to make a so-called "Cambio de calidad migratoria" (change of immigration status) in Peru.

Please be aware that Migraciones has the right to request other and/or additional documents at any time.

Required documents to apply for a retirement visa include:

  • Form PA - Cambio de Calidad Migratoria
  • Interpol clearance - Ficha de canje internacional not older than 6 months (see below)
  • Receipt for paid application fee (code Migraciones 07568; concept Cambio de calidad migratoria rentista residente, S/.162.50 in 2022)
  • Passport
  • Antecedentes policiales, penales y judiciales (Police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check) issued in the country of origin and, if the applicant lived in another country before coming to Peru, in the country of residence covering the last 5 years (*)
  • Letter / confirmation from your pension fund or social security stating that you receive a monthly income of at least US$ 1000 or the equivalent in any other currency. (**)
  • Sworn statement stating that your pension enters Peru through the banking system (***)

(*) As we get many question about the “Antecedentes policiales, penales y judiciales” we dedicated a separate article to the topic where we explain in detail what kind of document you need, where you get it and what to watch out for when applying for it.

One of the requirements to apply for a resident visa in Peru or to change your visa type, for example from a work visa to a permanent resident visa...

(**) Before (!!!) leaving your home country request the document from your pension fund or social security and get it apostilled if your country signed the Apostille Convention; otherwise, it has to be legalized by different authorities in your home country and the Peruvian consulate. The problem with both processes is that the letter needs an official signature to be apostilled or legalized. As most pension statements are generated automatically, they are usually not signed. So, it might be quite a mission in your home country to get it signed. One of our readers informed us that for US citizens with this problem, the US Embassy in Lima was very helpful and issued a notarized letter officially confirming the authenticity of the document that was accepted by the Peruvian immigration office; however, others weren't so lucky and the embassy wouldn't or couldn't do anything.

(***) With this sworn statement, you don't affirm that your pension payments are directly deposited in a Peruvian bank account, but that the money you need to live in Peru is "legally brought" into the country using official channels. So, you won't have any problem, for example, withdrawing funds from a foreign account using an ATM or having your pension deposited in an account in your home country and then transferring it to a Peruvian account (which you only get when you have your carné).

Applying for a retirement visa is a simple and straightforward process, but might be a little confusing here and there if you are not familiar with the process and the steps involved. Please see our step-by-step guide below, which should enable you to start and finish this little endeavor on your own, as general guidance only as requirements and processes change quickly. At least basic Spanish skills are required to fill in forms and understand instructions.

 

 Last steps before your retirement visa application in Peru

Hopefully, you brought the letter from your pension fund or social security as well as the Police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check already apostilled or legalized - see requirements and (*) and (**) above. Once in Peru, these have to be translated by an official translator (and if you only have a legalization on the documents, the translation has to be legalized again by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Lima). You can find a list of these state-approved translators either on the website of your embassy in Peru or here.

But we are not ready yet. Before you can even start your retirement visa application process, you first have to get the so-called “Ficha de Canje Internacional” from Interpol in Peru. Find a detailed description of how it’s done in our article “Interpol - Ficha de Canje Internacional”.

All foreigners must present the "Ficha de Canje Internacional" to Migraciones when changing their immigration status either from a temporary visa o...

Once you have the Ficha and all documents together, pay the fee of S/ 162.50 for the Migraciones administrative procedure “Cambio de Calidad Migratoria” under code 07568 with concepto "Rentista residente". As you already paid the Interpol fee, you know how the systems works, otherwise check again in our article "Paying administration charges and processing fees in Peru".

All administration charges, processing fees and fines government agencies, public authorities and entities levy in Peru have to be paid at the Banc...

And last but not least, make PDFs from your passport (page with your personal data and entry stamp), and from all other required documents.

Finally, the time has come to apply for your retirement visa. Be aware that in case you need to leave the country during the application process you have to apply for a special travel permit (Permiso especial de viaje, officially as well called Autorización de estadía fuera del país) before you leave the country, otherwise your application is null and void.

Foreigners in Peru who applied for a visa - to be precise who applied for a change of their immigration status (cambio de calidad migratoria) or a ...

Please be aware that you have to be in the country on a valid visa (for example, a tourist visa or "authorization to enter as a tourist") when applying for your religious visa in Peru.

 

Step-by-step guide to apply for a family visa in Peru

One remark before we start: The Agencia Digital, the online platform where you have to submit your application, is in Spanish only. We highly recommend to not using a translation program which automatically translates the page from Spanish to your preferred language to avoid system errors. Additionally, often translation programs have difficulties "understanding" the bureaucratic language used by Migraciones, which results in translations that don't make any sense or are more difficult for you to understand than the Spanish original. If you can't understand the one or other field, enter the description for this field in a translator. If you still can't make sense of it, feel free to leave a comment below and we try our best to explain what to fill in. And to avoid further system errors, we highly recommend to not using a VPN and switching off any ad blockers you might use.

Once you have done all the preparation work, open the Migraciones Agencia Digital and click on Entrar.

On the next page, select "Extranjero". Then choose in the drop-down menu the document with which you entered Peru (most probably passport), enter your passport number, your birthdate, nationality, the date you entered Peru and the captcha. Click on Verificar.

No matter which forms you fill out in Peru, always enter your personal data exactly (!!!) as in your passport!

Now you are on the main page of the Agencia Digital. Here you can either use the search field or find in the menu on the left under “Cambio de calidad migratoria” the point "Rentista Residente". Click on it and proceed to the next page.

1st page of the retirement visa application

Here, you first have to select the Migraciones branch which should handle your application (for example, Lima, Cusco, Arequipa, …). In the second field, you must enter a “data update code” which you most probably don’t have. Below this field is a quite small link.

Click on it and you end up on another page where you first have to fill in your nationality, select the document with which you entered Peru (most probably passport), enter your passport number, and your birth date, select your gender and enter the captcha; you can leave the field with the "preinscription code" blank. Then you end up on the quite extensive questionnaire.

Data update questionnaire

Be aware that you only have 1 hour to complete the questionnaire and as the system doesn’t save your information, even though there is an option to save, once you started you must finish it within an hour otherwise all your progress is gone, and you have to start from scratch. The questions are quite unorganized and partly a bit strange, so to give you an idea what questions you have to answer and might need to prepare for here an overview:

In the first two categories, you have to fill in your personal data including full name (as in your passport!), document with which you entered Peru, document number, gender, marital status, country of birth, if you have a criminal, police or judicial record, if you are pregnant.

The third category asks for your address in Peru, your e-mail address, cell phone number and landline phone number. Here you must upload a “recibo”, so a water or electricity bill to prove that you live at that address.

Then you are asked for the information of an emergency contact, including ID, name and e-mail of your emergency contact. This is followed by questions about your employment situation and where you were born (continent, country, town).

In the next category, you have to enter your hair and eye color, height in meters, weight in kilograms, religion, marital status, date of marriage, vaccinations and if you have a disability or disease. You are then asked if you arrived in Peru alone or if someone was accompanying you. If so, you must enter the personal data (passport number, name, last name, birthdate) of that person. Now you are asked if you have lived in other countries previously and in which country before coming to Peru, when you last entered Peru, how you came to Peru (plane, bus, car).

The last questions check your living conditions (are you living in a house, number of rooms, accommodation connected to water, sewage, electricity, and internet), ask for some financial info (bank accounts in Peru or other countries, shares, or stock in Peru, bank loans in Peru) and want to know if you have a car and a driver’s license in Peru or other country.

As soon as you have completed the last page of the questionnaire, the system accepts all your answers and sends the data update code to your e-mail.

You made it!

Back to the 1st page of the retirement visa application

Now fill in the data update code and click on Siguente.

2nd page of the retirement visa application

You end up on a page where you must fill in some data and/or upload all for the retirement visa application necessary documents as PDF.

Those who just want to verify the requirements or double check if the requirements have changed can do so on this page. Then just click through the tabs but do not upload any documents and do not click on Siguente; once you finished just leave the page.

To continue with your retirement visa application, click on the little arrows next to each requirement, and certain fields appear depending on the requirement. Just fill in the fields as requested and upload the corresponding document.

Under “Pago por derecho de tramite” you are asked to enter certain information of the bank receipt. If you don't know where to find the requested bank information on your receipt, click on the question mark.

Under the Interpol tab, you must upload the Ficha de Canje from Interpol and the criminal record check you brought from home. Be aware that both fields are mandatory, and you can’t continue without having uploaded both documents.

Under the next tab, you must upload the letter from your pension fund and below the sworn statement. And finally, fill in the required information of your passport and upload a copy.

Once you uploaded all your documents, click on Siguente.

3rd page of the retirement visa application

Once you uploaded all documents, you end up on a page showing the fields of the Form PA - Cambio de calidad migratoria already (partly) filled in. If and where necessary, complete the fields and check that all information is 100% correct. As downloading on this page doesn't seem to work anymore, download the Form PA - Cambio de Calidad Migratoria on the government website, fill it in, sign and fingerprint it and keep it safe until you pick up your carné.

4th page of the retirement visa application

Since mid-2022, the system then gives you a code and the option to make an appointment for having your biometrical data (photo, fingerprints, signature) taken. Best immediately make a screenshot of the code as once you leave this page, you can't return to it. And if you haven't saved and forgot the code, it's a nightmare and nearly impossible to retrieve it.

As waiting times sometimes are long, especially in Lima, we suggest that you make the appointment immediately.

At the end of the process - if everything works smoothly - you get the confirmation of your application. Download this document and/or print it and keep it safe.

At the bottom of this document, you find the login data for the "Buzon Electronico" (your personal electronic mailbox) which you should check regularly for notifications from Migraciones (for example, request to upload missing or additional documents, approval or denial of your visa application, etc.)

Important: Some of our readers reported that they didn’t get a confirmation letter, but the login data for the Buzón was shown on the screen. If during your application process you see any code, login data or seemingly other important information, we highly recommend taking a screenshot. If for whatever reason you won’t get the codes or logins send to you and you haven’t saved them while you had the chance, it's a nightmare and nearly impossible to retrieve them.

 

Getting your Carné (foreigner ID)

Biometrical data appointment

On the day of your biometrical data appointment, be at the office 15 - 30 minutes before your appointment with all your documents (passport, appointment, application, all documents, receipts). Be aware that in Lima, the biometrical data is taken at the Migraciones office on Jr. Carabaya and not at the main office in Breña. The process is quick and astonishingly well organized; you should be done in less than half an hour. The staff usually tells you when you should make an appointment to pick up your carné, but often a message is sent as well via the buzón electronico. So keep an eye on that. Expect to wait 10 - 14 days (or longer, if Migraciones is behind with approving applications) while your carné is in the process of being issued.

Registration in the foreigner database

After your biometrical data appointment (so as soon as your application was approved), pay the fee of S/ 49.90 on pagalo.pe under code 07561-Formulario F-SPE-001 for the registration in the foreigner database and issuance of the carné under concepto "Expedición del carné de extranjeria".

Then once again enter the Agencia Digtal to do the online registration under “Inscr. Reg. central extranjeria”. As before, just follow the steps as indicated. Check that all information is correct. At the end, you get a confirmation which you should download and/or print and keep safe.

Be aware that in case the approval of your visa application is still in process, the registration doesn't work. So, then just wait with the online registration until your visa application is approved and do it then.

Picking up your carné at Migraciones

Once your application was approved and you registered in the foreign database, make an appointment on the Agencia Digital under “Citas en linea” to pick up your carné. Once again, download and/or print the confirmation and keep it safe.

On the day of your appointment, arrive at Migraciones 15 - 30 minutes early. Take your passport, all documents, confirmation(s) and receipts with you. Migraciones staff will point you in the right direction where you are handed your carné.

Congratulations! You made it!

 

Things you should know living in Peru on a retirement visa

The retirement visa (so the residence permit) has an indefinite validity and does not have to be renewed. However, be aware that the carné (so, the foreigner ID card) is usually only valid for four years and then has to be renewed.

Foreigners living in Peru on a retirement visa have to be in the country at least 183 days per year, otherwise they lose their resident status. If you have to be outside the country longer, before leaving apply for the Autorización de estadía fuera del país por 183 días, and won't lose your residence permit.

If you are living in Peru on a retirement visa, you are not allowed to work or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru.

Your pension payments are exempted from taxation in Peru.

If any information provided when applying for your retirement visa changes, Migraciones must be informed about it within 30 days. So, if you get a new passport, change your name, move to a new address, etc. you have to apply for a so-called "modificación de datos en el registro central de extranjería". Be aware that, in some cases, a new carné has to be issued after the application is approved.

As you already have an unlimited residence permit, you can't change to the Peruvian "Permanente residente" visa.

And finally, if you, as a foreigner living in Peru on a retirement visa, are leaving Peru permanently, you have to cancel your residence visa. Once the application is approved, you have 15 days to exit the country.

 

Please note: We from LimaEasy are not the Peruvian immigration authority Migraciones or a Peruvian consulate. All information is published to our best knowledge and should be seen as general guidance introducing you to Peruvian procedures. All information is subject to change, as regulations, requirements, and processes can change quickly without prior notice! Therefore, we recommend checking the current regulations with the nearest Peruvian consulate or, if you are already in Peru, with Migraciones!

And if you find something wrong on this page, please help us to keep this guide as up to date as possible and contact us either below with a comment or use our contact form. Thank you!

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  • This commment is unpublished.
    John · 28/11/2022
    Hello, have you heard of any problems lately with the Agencia Digital website portal?  I tried to submit my papers last night online but it gave me an error message that the site was experiencing technical problems connecting to their servers.  When I re-tried to submit them later that evening, the 'Rentista Residente' category had completely vanished (both on the left side of the menu and when trying to perform a manual search).

    As of 11am on November 29, 2022 the category is still not appearing whatsoever on the website.  Can't be that Peru all of a sudden eliminated the rentista program altogether, has to be some sort of technical IT glitch, right?  Any suggestions on what to do now?  

    Submitting the papers online through the portal is the only current way Peru allows one to request the change of immigration status correct?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/11/2022
      @John Hello John,

      Sometimes the Agencia Digital has some technical issues and won’t load, doesn’t show the complete menu, etc.

      I haven’t heard that there are problems at the moment, but I just entered the Agencia and it won’t show me any option to make the “cambio de calidad migratoria” neither to rentista nor family nor any other resident visa. If I use the search function nothing comes up. So, it seems there is some sort of issue. And no, Peru didn’t eliminate the Rentista visa.

      Anyway, in case you use any translation programs, VPNs or ad blockers switch them off. These often cause system errors. Then clear your cache and browsing history and try again or try using another browser. This sometimes solves the problem. And best use the Agencia only during normal business hours; sometimes in the evening, at night or on weekends Peruvian government websites don’t work properly.

      And yes, the only way to submit your paperwork for the rentista visa application (and all other resident visa applications) is through the Agencia Digital. If by tomorrow the system still doesn’t show you the option Rentista under Cambio de calidad migratoria then you should contact Migraciones either using the Chat (at the bottom right on the Agencia Digital) or call 200-1000.

      All the best

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Malcolm · 26/11/2022
    Thank you for your excellent advice. Can I ask about the rule, that you have to stay a minimum of 183 days a year in peru with a retirement visa. Is this a calendar year Jan 1st to Dec 31st? What happens if you have to exit for some family emergency? is there a way to obtain temporary exemption.
    Also when I last entered Peru, I struggled to get the full 90 days, I had to reel of a long list of tourism sites before they said I could have it but it was the last time this year? Not sure what she meant as I was exiting in Nov 22, so not much of the year left anyway.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/11/2022
      @Malcolm Hello Malcom,

      Yes, if you live in Peru on a retirement visa, you have to be in Peru for 183 days, so half year, in a year. And no, it’s not per calendar year, it’s counted from the day you receive your retirement visa.

      You can leave the country whenever you want. But if you stay outside Peru for longer than half a year in a year, you lose your residency. However, if you must leave Peru for emergencies or due to force majeure for more than half a year, you can apply for a special permit, the so-called “Permiso de estadía fuera del país por 183 días calendario”. For many years, you had to submit the application for this permit before (!) you left the country. But, according to the new TUPA (page 23), you now must apply before the 183 days you are allowed to stay outside Peru are over. If you are still in Peru, you can apply for the permit on the Agencia Digital. How it works if you are already outside the country is unclear.

      Over the past weeks, I heard from quite a number of frequent Peru travelers that immigrations at the airport is extremely strict counting (and sometimes miscalculating to the detriment of the foreigner) every single day stayed before in the country and only giving the absolute minimum. Anyway, the rules are quite clear. Most foreign nationals, who don’t have to apply for a tourist visa before coming to Peru, can stay in the country as a tourist for up to (!) 90 days in a 180-day period (so up to 3 months in Peru and at least 3 months out of Peru) and a maximum of 183 days in a 365-day period (so half a year in a year). However, it’s always at the discretion of the immigration officer you have to face how many days he/she is giving you.

      And here as well the 180-day period isn't per half year from January to June or July to December and the 365-day period isn’t from January to December, but calculated from your first entry.

      So, if you entered, for example, on March 1 and got 90 days, you must have left by May 30. Your 180-day period ends on August 28. So, you shouldn't re-enter Peru before that day. Then you entered again let's say on September 1, got 90 days and must leave by November 30. You now had the maximum allowed days as a tourist per year and shouldn't re-enter before March 1 the next year.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Malcolm · 27/11/2022
      @Sunflower Thanks Eva, 
      Just one more related question if I may. While in Peru, our neighbour who holds a Polish passport was saying he is given 180 days rather than the maximum 90. He said there are rules for different countries, but I've never managed to find out where this list exists. The only reason I ask, is that I am from the UK, and have only been given 90 days maximum. However, the UK has just opened up visa free days to Peruvian nationals for up to 6 month stays in the UK, so was wondering if Peru now operate a reciprocate agreement to UK nationals?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/11/2022
      @Malcolm Hello Malcom,

      Yes, your neighbor is right, it depends on your nationality on how many days you can stay in Peru as a tourist. But, most nationalities, who can travel to Peru visa-free, are allowed 90 days in a 180-day period and a max of 183 days in a year. Polish nationals aren’t an exemption.

      You can find the list showing if you need a tourist visa to enter Peru or not and, if you can travel to Peru visa-free, how long you can stay on the Peruvian government website. The list was last updated in June 2022. I don’t have any information about an agreement between the UK and Peru and how this might affect the allowed days you can stay as a UK national in Peru. Probably check with Migraciones or the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

      Anyway, on page 4 of the list under “Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte” (or on the screenshot I attached) you see that UK nationals do not need a visa, but as the list was first introduced when the UK was about to leave the EU and back then no agreement between Peru and UK was in place, no number of days are written there. But, over the past year, travelers reported that UK nationals get as nearly everyone else 90 days in a 180-day period.

      And the same applies to Polish nationals and all other EU nationals. There you even explicitly find 90/180, meaning 90 days in a 180-day period. So, while from 2019 (when the list was first introduced) to mid-2021 you could easily still get the full 180 days, since August 2021 immigration officers most times strictly enforce the 90 days in a 180 day-period and a max of 183 days in a year rule. So, I would really love to see the entry stamp of your Polish neighbor showing that he got 180 days when he entered Peru this (!) year.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Tania · 22/11/2022
    Hi Eva,

    Thanks again for the great job you do on informing everyone with accurate up to date information. 

    As far as my situation you helped me out in 2020 when I asked questions on getting the Rentista Visa as a couple. I mentioned my father was Peruvian and you said because of that I could easily get citizenship in my home country. So I did and it was super easy and inexpensive. My Peruvian citizenship, DNI and passport all at the Peruvian consulate in San Francisco, California.

    Now on the new requirements for my husband’s Rentista Visa. I wrote you the previous comment while we were already in Peru. After doing some research on your site I found a readers experience who also landed in Peru not knowing about the new background check from your home country. He gave all the details on how to accomplish it from Peru which was great ! The biggest issue being the amount of time for the whole process which unfortunately we didn't have because of a mistake made at the airport by the immigration officer.

    The immigration officer told my husband he only had 4 days left to be in Peru which was a shock to us. We had previously entered Peru on April 11, 2022 and they gave him 90 days but we only stayed 86 days, we left Peru on July 7th 2022. Now we entered Peru on October 28th 2022 hoping for another 90 days so we dont know why she said he only had 4 days left. My husband explained he was going to get his Rentista Visa done again and needed more time. She said she would as a courtesy give him 30 days but that was it.

    We went to our hotel and got online to figure out what she was talking about. We saw the 183 day rule and figured the only explanation was she miscalculated. After several emails to migraciones and 2 video chats we were told in fact she was wrong and that my husband still had over 90 days available but there was nothing that could be done. Since Tourist Visa extensions are no longer given and that he needs more than 30 days to complete his paperwork he cant apply for his Rentista Visa on an expired Tourist Visa. His only option is to leave the country and come back in hoping the next immigration officer at the airport calculates correctly.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/11/2022
      @Tania Hello Tania,

      Sorry, I didn’t connect the dots when you wrote last month. But it’s great to hear that you got your Peruvian nationality, including passport and DNI so easily and you are now officially Peruvian. Congrats!

      So, if I understand correctly, you and your husband are both now in Peru; you hopefully as a Peruvian and your husband wants to apply for the retirement visa, but can’t because he doesn’t have his criminal record check and his stay as a tourist expires soon as the immigration officer only gave you 30 days, which by the way is ridiculous, but nothing can be done about it anymore. Correct?

      First of all, if you are in Peru as a Peruvian, your husband as well could apply for a family visa. The criminal record requirement for both resident visas is the same, but instead of the letter confirming his pension, he only would need a Peruvian marriage certificate; so it would be necessary that you register your marriage either at a Peruvian consulate or at Reniec. Even though the family visa offers a few perks compared to the retirement visa, assuming you haven’t registered your marriage with a Peruvian authority, I think that would complicate matters even more. For now, the retirement visa might be the better option if only the criminal record check is missing. If at a later date you decide the family visa is the better option, he could later change to a family visa.

      For now back to the retirement visa. If your husband got 30 days when he entered, then his stay as a tourist is valid until November 27. So, November 27 is the last day he could apply. Do you have all other documents necessary for the retirement visa application? Is only the criminal record check missing? Nothing else?

      If so, then there might be an option for him to apply without having to leave the country and return with another immigration officer probably giving him trouble, even though he doesn’t have his criminal record check.

      On the last day his stay as a tourist is still valid (better the day before that, so November 26), he could apply on the Agencia Digital as described above under “Finally, applying for a retirement visa in Peru”.

      On the second page of the retirement visa application, most fields are mandatory. There he must, for example, upload the letter of the pension fund or the PDF of the Ficha from Interpol and the criminal record check. As he won’t have his criminal record check, but must upload something to continue, he could, however, upload the Ficha a second time (which another user just recently did and shared with us) or a letter saying “Sorry, still waiting for the criminal record check from my home country, but had to apply before my stay as a tourist runs out”. If he fills in all other necessary fields / upload all other required documents, he can continue with the application process and submit his application with no further problems.

      But, and this is super important, he must check his Buzon every day. Migraciones will send a notification (which depending on their workload might take anything between a few days to even a couple of months) requesting that he uploads the criminal record check usually within 10 days.

      When he gets this notification, he must react latest on the last day of this deadline. If by then he has his criminal record check, he can just upload it. If he still doesn’t have it, he can apply for an extension of the deadline (usually for an additional 30 days).

      The process might sound a little bit intimidating, but while this option is a little loophole, it's legit and allows your husband to apply for his retirement shortly before his stay as a tourist expires without having to leave and trying to re-enter.

      If you need further information about the process or have any doubts, let me know.

      All the best
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/11/2022
      @Tania I just re-read your comment. Not sure anymore if you have the criminal record check but something else, such as the Ficha, is still missing. The process works with other documents not ready to upload as well.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Sean · 16/11/2022
    Hi Eva,

    Are there businesses that guide and get you through the visa process or do we have to do it alone? If yes, do you have any recommendations for an agency to work with?

    Thanks,
    Sean
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 16/11/2022
      @Sean Hello Sean,

      The aim of this article about the retirement visa and many others here on LimaEasy is that you can easily do the complete application on your own. If you follow this guide, you won’t need anyone.

      But, yes, there are immigration lawyers and so-called tramitadores who help with the application process in Peru. You should, however, be aware that they can’t support you getting necessary documents from your home country (in case of the retirement visa, you must get your criminal record check and the pension statement incl. Apostille on your own in your home country).

      They then can make the payment for the Interpol clearance and set up the Interpol appointment for you, but you have to go there on your own (as far as I know, since Covid only the applicant is allowed inside). They further can make the payments for your application and later your carné and fill in the online forms, check if you get notifications, make an appointment for getting the biometrical data taken and make an appointment for picking up your carné (but as above, as far as I know, since Covid only the applicant is allowed inside the Migraciones building).

      Anyway, no, we do not recommend any immigration lawyer or tramitador anymore. We had to learn the hard way that skills, knowledge, work ethic, reliability, punctuality, and the fees for offered service often aren’t consistent. Therefore, we refrain from any recommendations.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    James · 15/11/2022
    Can we apply for citizenship after living in Peru for two years with a Pension/Retirement Visa?  I ask because it seems that laws or rules have recently changes since October of 2022.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 15/11/2022
      @James Hello James,

      Laws and rules constantly change in Peru, but most of these changes or modifications are irrelevant for foreigners. When I hear October 2022, the only important change that comes to mind is the Decreto Supremo 130-2022-PCM, which ended all Corona regulations and restrictions. So, I’m not sure which laws and rules you are referring to, as the DS 130 has nothing to do with a retirement visa or the naturalization process.

      As far as I know, the two laws/regulations (the Peruvian Nationality Law and the Supreme Decree 002-2021-IN) that are in place to determine the requirements to get the Peruvian citizenship through naturalization didn’t change. But I might have missed something. In July 2022, the TUPA, the administrative procedure stipulating the handling of applications, so the instruction manual for Migraciones, was updated with slight changes.

      Anyway, as already described below I can’t answer your question, if you can apply for the Peruvian nationality through naturalization as a rentista, 100% accurately. While the laws and regulations are quite clear, their interpretation and how they are executed seems to change now and then. However, I do my best to explain the relevant laws, share my interpretation of them and the experience of others trying to become a naturalized Peruvian on a rentista visa recently.

      According to the Ley de Nacionalidad (Decreto Supremo 004-97-IN) foreigners who want to be naturalized not only must have lived in Peru for two consecutive years (see article 3a), but also must have practiced a profession, art, trade, or business activity (see article 3b); in short must have paid taxes in Peru. As a foreigner who is legally in Peru as a rentista, you are strictly prohibited from doing that. You aren’t allowed to work in Peru and can’t receive any kind of renumeration in Peru as rentista; and you don’t have to pay taxes in Peru on your pension income. So, as a rentista you can’t meet this fundamental condition as stipulated in the Nationality Law.

      Additionally, when applying for Peruvian citizenship through naturalization (other rules apply, if you are married to a Peruvian, for example), you must prove an annual income of at least 10 UITs (in 2022 that’s S/ 46,000), which allows you to live independently in Peru (see Decreto Supremo 002-2021-IN, page 53, article 9e).

      In the same article 9 from a-g you find all general requirements everyone who qualifies must fulfill. Starting with h (or on the Peruvian government website) the specific requirements depending on the visa type on which you live in Peru are listed. There only calidad migratoria de religioso, calidad migratoria de trabajador dependiente, calidad migratoria de inversionista and calidad migratoria de trabajador independiente are mentioned; not the calidad migratoria de rentista. Different rules apply to foreigners who are married to a Peruvian or who have made special contributions to the country.

      With this being said, in my opinion as a rentista you can’t apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization as a rentista.

      But, in the years before Corona, some immigration lawyers somehow managed that Migraciones a) didn’t ask for proof that the applying rentista pursued a profession in Peru and b) accepted the pension payment as income. I know a few foreigners who applied for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization after having lived in Peru for 2 years on a rentista visa, who were approved and received their Peruvian nationality.

      However, at the end of last year I was in contact with a foreigner who is living in Peru since 2018 as a rentista. After the Covid lockdowns and with life slowly returning more or less to normal, he finally wanted to apply for his Peruvian nationality, which back in 2018, his lawyer and Migraciones confirmed wasn’t a problem after living in Peru for 2 years. But when he got in contact again with Migraciones to ask about current requirements, he was told that as a rentista he can’t apply for the Peruvian nationality.

      Anyway, things change in Peru, sometimes without being made public or with no one really catching it. So, I might have missed something or my interpretation is outdated / wrong. From time to time, it also depends on how a certain law is interpreted in general or how the person handling your application interprets it. So, even though the replies you usually get from Migraciones can be quite “creative” maybe just get in contact with them, ask if you can apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization as rentista and hope for the best. Maybe the interpretation or execution of the law changed again and you are lucky.

      I wish you all the best

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jonathan Kiehle · 05/11/2022
    For the $18 payment to the FBI. Can’t I just get an international money order in the US and bring it with me?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 05/11/2022
      @Jonathan Kiehle Hello Jonathan,

      Honestly, I don’t know, but I don’t think so. The international money order you need is to send money from Peru to the FBI in the US.

      On our Interpol article, we just recently had someone who asked if it might be possible to pay the US$18 directly online via the FBI secure payment portal. Here as well, I don’t know if Interpol in Peru accepts the payment and suggest checking with Interpol Peru to avoid wasting time and money.

      Sorry.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Tania · 26/10/2022
    Hello,

    Your article and very helpful advice was a great asset in acquiring the Rentista Visa for my husband in 2020. Unfortunately we got caught in the first phase of the pandemic in Peru and decided to return to the U.S. to be with family and ride it out there. Because we stayed outside of Peru for more than 6 months we have to start the process over. I was reviewing your article to see if any requirements have changed since 2020. One that seems new is the police type clearance that you mention. In 2020 my husband did the interpol clearance in Peru and we remember having to send some kind of document back to the FBI or something thru Serpost. The only documents we had to bring with us to Peru was the apostilled pension paper. So then is this a new step, bringing in proof of a clean record from country of origin ? If so it seems that this too must be officially translated in Spanish in Peru like the apostilled pension paper ? Am I understanding this correctly and is there any other changes ?


    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/10/2022
      @Tania Hello Tania,

      Thank you for your kind words. It’s always good to hear that our articles are helpful.

      And yes, in August 2021, some Migraciones procedures and requirements for resident visa applications changed.

      For retirees like you this means that next to the letter/confirmation from your pension fund or social security stating that you receive a monthly income of at least US$ 1000 which must be apostilled in your case in the US and then, once you are in Peru, be translated into Spanish by an official translator, you as US national additionally must bring an FBI Criminal Record Check proving you have a clean criminal record, as well apostilled and once in Peru translated by an official translator.

      Then, before you can apply for your retirement visa (accurately before you can change your immigration status from tourist to retiree) you must pay Interpol in Peru a visit to get the ficha de canje which is a document certifying that you aren’t an internationally wanted fugitive. Furthermore, the US government/the FBI requests from Interpol Peru that an additional check is done for which you need the money order and must be send back and forth (the one you remember).

      According to Interpol Peru, this additional check has nothing to do with issuing the ficha de canje, but as well is not the same as the FBI Criminal Record Check you must present at Migraciones when applying for your retirement visa.

      So, bring from the US your passport, the apostilled pension letter, and the apostilled FBI check. All the other requirements (interpol ficha, payment receipt, sworn statement and application form) can be done in Peru.

      Greetings
      Eva

      P.S. Just one little remark. You said in 2020 your husband went to Interpol. You not? How are you planning to stay in Peru? Depending on the resident visa you apply for you most probably need an FBI record check as well and might need a recent copy of your marriage certificate (of course as well apostilled and translated).
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mato · 15/09/2022
    Hello. Thank you for the article.

    I am wondering if it is possible to apply for Peruvian citizenship after two years of residing in Peru on the rentista visa. From my research I am not sure if I don’t have to reside in Peru for two years as a permanent resident in order to be able to apply for citizenship, or if I can do so immediately after the two years on rentista visa. 

    Thank you for your help.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 15/09/2022
      @Mato Hello Mato,

      I can’t answer your question 100% accurately. While the laws and regulations are quite clear, their interpretation and how they are executed seems to change now and then. However, I can explain the corresponding laws, share my interpretation of them and the experience of others trying to become a naturalized Peruvian on a rentista visa recently.

      According to the Ley de Nacionalidad (Decreto Supremo 004-97-IN) foreigners who want to be naturalized not only must have lived in Peru for two consecutive years (see article 3a), but also must have practiced a profession, art, trade, or business activity (see article 3b); in short must have paid taxes in Peru. As a foreigner who is legally in Peru as a rentista, you are strictly prohibited from doing that. You aren’t allowed to work in Peru and can’t receive any kind of renumeration in Peru as rentista; and you don’t have to pay taxes in Peru on your pension income. So, as a rentista you can’t meet this fundamental condition as stipulated in the Nationality Law.

      Additionally, when applying for Peruvian citizenship through naturalization (other rules apply, if you are married to a Peruvian, for example), you must prove an annual income of at least 10 UITs (in 2022 that’s S/ 46,000), which allows you to live independently in Peru (see Decreto Supremo 002-2021-IN, page 53, article 9e).

      In the same article 9 from a-g you find all general requirements everyone who qualifies must fulfill. Starting with h (or on the Peruvian government website) the specific requirements depending on the visa type on which you live in Peru are listed. There only calidad migratoria de religioso, calidad migratoria de trabajador dependiente, calidad migratoria de inversionista and calidad migratoria de trabajador independiente are mentioned; not the calidad migratoria de rentista. Different rules apply to foreigners who are married to a Peruvian or who have made special contributions to the country.

      With this being said, in my opinion as a rentista you can’t apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization as a rentista.

      But, in the years before Corona, some immigration lawyers somehow managed that Migraciones a) didn’t ask for proof that the applying rentista pursued a profession in Peru and b) accepted the pension payment as income. I know a few foreigners who applied for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization after having lived in Peru 2 years on a rentista visa, who were approved and received their Peruvian nationality.

      However, at the end of last year I was in contact with a foreigner who is living in Peru since 2018 as a rentista. After the Covid lockdowns and with life slowly returning more or less to normal, he finally wanted to apply for his Peruvian nationality, which back in 2018 his lawyer and Migraciones confirmed wasn’t a problem after living in Peru for 2 years. But when he got in contact again with Migraciones to ask about current requirements, he was told that as a rentista he can’t apply for the Peruvian nationality.

      Anyway, things change in Peru, sometimes without being made public or without anyone really catching it. From time to time, it also depends on how a certain law is interpreted in general or how the person handling your application interprets it. So, even though the replies you usually get from Migraciones can be quite “creative” maybe just get in contact with them, ask if you can apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization as rentista and hope for the best. Maybe the interpretation or execution of the law changed again and you are lucky.

      And, one last little note: you can’t change your immigration status from rentista to permanent resident as with the rentista visa you already get a residency with indefinite validity.

      I wish you all the best

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Matej · 24/09/2022
      @Sunflower Hello Eva,

      Thank you so much for your comprehensive and informative response.

      I wish you the best,
      Matej.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Victor · 02/09/2022
    Hello. Thanks for all the great info. My question deals with Peruvian born but Naturalized American….returning to Peru. I have a U.S. passport and a U.S. pension. I’m wondering if I could enter Peru as a tourist then apply for citizenship based on my birth certificate. I’m also concerned about paying taxes on pension funds being deposited in a Peruvian bank. Countries like Colombia tax 40% of pension funds from abroad. 
    Thanks again for the info!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/09/2022
      @Victor Hello Victor,

      You were born in Peru and have a Peruvian birth certificate, so as long as you never renounced your Peruvian nationality, you are still Peruvian, even though you might additionally have a US passport and a US pension.

      So, my question is, did you ever officially renounce your Peruvian nationality?

      If you have renounced your Peruvian nationality, you can enter Peru as a tourist and then start the process of recuperating your Peruvian nationality (“Solicitar la recuperación de la nacionalidad peruana”).

      If you haven’t renounced your Peruvian nationality, then you are still Peruvian and don’t have to apply for citizenship in Peru. But you have to get your Peruvian documents in order. Peruvians who next to the Peruvian nationality have another one (in your case from the US) are advised to enter and leave Peru only with their Peruvian passport.

      Anyway, you now have two options:

      - Get in contact with the nearest Peruvian consulate. They can explain the process in detail. In short: first you have to apply for your DNI at the consulate. Once you have your DNI, then you can apply for your Peruvian passport at the consulate.

      - Or enter Peru as a tourist, which, according to the Peruvian Nationality Law, shouldn’t be doneby Peruvians. Once in Peru, pay Reniec a visit and apply for your DNI. When you have your DNI, apply for your Peruvian passport at Migraciones.

      Regarding your tax question. Honestly, I’m anything but a money / tax expert and highly recommend asking someone with more knowledge. But my first question would be why you want to deposit your US pension (fund?) into a Peruvian bank account? It might be wiser to leave it in the US and then either transfer what you need to a Peruvian account or withdraw from an ATM. If you officially have your pension transferred to a Peruvian bank account, I don’t know how Sunat will categorize it, especially as it doesn’t fit into the “foreign income” category (there depending on the amount taxes of either 8%, 14%, 17%, 20% or 30% have to be paid on it) and not in the “Peruvian pension” category. Additionally, when I understood you correctly, we are not talking about a monthly pension payment, but a one-time pension fund payment. So, sorry, I really don’t know.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Victor Chavez · 02/09/2022
      @Sunflower That’s very helpful, thank you. I don’t recall ever renouncing a citizenship, however my mother may have dove it for me. I don’t know. I think probably they will tell me when I go to the Peruvian Embassy to apply for my DNI. I am presently living in Colombia so I’ll need to go to Bogota. 
      I do receive a monthly pension check from the US and, at least in Colombia, it’s so much easier to live with a local bank account then have to live with removing cash from ATMs for everything from rent to car payments. It’s why I asked. If I have to I’ll I live from ATM withdrawals. :)
      Thank you
      Best help I received yet!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 03/09/2022
      @Victor Chavez Hello Victor,

      Yes, I think it’s best to talk to someone at the consulate, first to find out if they somehow can find out if your mother ever renounced your Peruvian nationality and then if they think it’s better to apply for your DNI (and after that your passport) at the consulate or in Peru.

      But be aware that you only get up to 90 days in case you enter Peru as a tourist. As it might take a while to get an appointment at Reniec and as there might be delays or the one or other hurdle to conquer, time could be an issue. But it’s doable. Although many, many years ago, my husband in a similar situation as yours entered as a tourist, got a new copy of his birth certificate at the municipality he was registered, went to Reniec with all other necessary documents and within days had his DNI.

      And yes, in Peru as well it’s much easier to have a local bank account and if you are Peruvian, you get one with no problems; but this doesn’t mean that your retirement payment has to be directly (!) deposited it in. Anyway, as said before, I’m not an expert when it comes to money, banks and taxes. Sorry. And probably it’s not even necessary to look for other options. The point is how Sunat will categorize your retirement income. Do they put it in the “foreign income” category, where it doesn’t really fit, then you have to pay taxes as mentioned in my comment above. But in case they accept it as official retirement income, which, when I remember correctly, is not taxed in Peru, all is good.

      I hope everything works out for you.

      All the best
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Carlos · 06/08/2022
    For a Rentista Visa, Will Peru Immigrations will deny a visa for ANY FBI Criminal Record?  I only have a one-time, one night arrest without conviction for just being too loud, an oral argument with my brother, one of my indiscretions as a youth, more than 30 years ago.  There were not charges whatsoever, but it will still show up in my FBI Criminal Record.  I'd think that I wouldn't deny a visa just for that, will I?  Or do you need to be a perfect saint to live in Peru? 

    Also, if I get a Rentista Visa, can I still work in the Internet if I am paid in the US directly to my US bank?  Will this be allowed?  If allowed, would they ask me to pay Peruvian income taxes on it?

    Thanks, 

    CMC
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 06/08/2022
      @Carlos Hello Carlos,

      The Peruvian law requires a “clean” criminal record. So, I honestly don’t know, if a resident visa application is denied because of an arrest 30 years ago that didn’t lead to a conviction. I highly doubt it.

      Additionally, are you sure this arrest will show up on your FBI check? I’m not a US citizen, don’t know the exact laws and never have seen an FBI criminal background check. As far as I read, it doesn’t provide a full background history from the start of your adult life and only checks your criminal history of the last seven years (somewhere else I found 11 years). Furthermore, arrests that didn’t lead to conviction seems to be not always included. Even though most arrests are public record and could show up on your background check, some states restrict access to arrest information, while other destroy or omit information in case the claim was dismissed, or the arrested person found not guilty. So, probably these little “indiscretions as a youth” is long gone.

      To get the rentista visa you must present a letter from your pension fund or social security stating that you receive a monthly pension / benefits of at least US$ 1000. Income from work is not accepted.

      Once you have your retirement visa, you are officially not allowed to work in Peru for a Peruvian company earning a Peruvian income which is deposited in a Peruvian bank account. So, you can’t pay income tax in Peru because you are not allowed to make any money in Peru.

      However, even though a bit of a grey zone, you could work online for a, for example, US company earning US$ which are deposited in a US account and are taxed in the US.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Naima · 21/07/2022
    Hello,
    First, thank you for the quality of information shared here. It is thorough and answers many questions I was awfully confused about on the gob.pe site. I had in fact emailed them with an inquiry on starting the Solicitar calidad migratoria para rentista residente. Their response included advice that the procedure must be carried out through the virtual migration platform. Perhaps based on the new Migration TUPA, or the fact that Peru does not have a consulate in Nigeria. 
    There are conditions that apply and of course, the requirements here: https://www.gob.pe/12875-solicitar-calidad-migratoria-para-rentista-residente

    I've got all documentation, but I'm back at the start of Migraciones Agencia Digital, where I still hit the brick wall - I am not in the system. The instruction is to download the Enrolmiento Moviles Migraciones app and scan the platform's QR code to upload a photo and signature. I have searched through the National Superintendency of Migrations site for a QR code without success.

    I wonder if I am missing something. Otherwise, are there any experiences of applicants applying through the virtual migration platform, outside of Peru (territory) and without going through a consulate?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 21/07/2022
      @Naima Hello Naima,

      You cannot apply through the Agencia Digital, if you are not in Peru. You must have entered the country, so you are in the system even if it’s as a tourist.

      The Enrolmiento Moviles Migraciones app was intended during Covid restrictions to get the biometrical data of applicants, but for a few months now it isn’t used anymore and Migraciones takes the fingerprints, photo and signature in person during the resident visa approval process.

      As Nigerian you cannot enter Peru visa-free, so you need a visa before being allowed to come to Peru, which leaves you with two options, and both involve a Peruvian consulate:

      - Apply for your retirement visa at a Peruvian consulate. The nearest one is in Accra, Ghana. But I heard they don’t issue resident visas anymore, only temporary visas such as tourist or business visas. But as your circumstances might be different, nothing wrong with asking there.

      - Apply for a tourist visa at a Peruvian consulate, then travel to Peru and once there get your Interpol clearance and apply through the Agencia Digital as described above.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Nick · 22/06/2022
    Hi,
    I am travelling to Lima in Sept2022 to volunteer for three months and longer if I can extend my stay.I presume I travel visa free being British with UK passport for 90 days,could I extend this to 183days on my arrival and if so where can I do this?
    cheers
    nick
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 22/06/2022
      @Nick Hello Nick,

      Not sure how you ended up here on the retirement visa article.

      No, you can’t extend your “tourist visa” - it isn’t a “real” tourist visa but an “authorization to enter as a tourist” which you get upon arrival in Peru - beyond the 90 days anymore. According to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, most nationalities can only stay 90 days in a 183-day period as a tourist in Peru. For detailed info, have a look at our article “Tourist visa extension in Peru”.

      If you want to stay longer than the 90 days, you could overstay your welcome and pay a fine of S/ 4.60 per overstayed day when leaving. As you are illegally in the country as soon as your tourist visa expires, we can’t recommend this option. However, usually you don’t have to fear any reprisal when overstaying.

      Another option is to leave Peru and return a couple of days later. According to reports from other travelers, most only got 3 to 30 days when returning via Jorge Chavez International airport and between 15 and 30 days at the Chile and Bolivia land border. So, not really an option.

      The third option could be to apply for a temporary resident visa (such as temporary student visa, temporary work visa, temporary art visa, temporary journalist visa, etc.) which is good for one year, however requirements are steep and you have to go through the normal resident visa application process which at the moment, at least in Lima, takes many months.

      Greetings
      Eva

      P.S. Please note: all mentioned above is based on the current visa regulations; as far as I’m aware, an update should be published somewhere around the beginning of July. So, there might be some minor or major changes.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Carmen · 10/06/2022
    Can I apply for the rentist visa while I live in Dallas? This way I can ship my household items after getting one, how long it takes?
    I have dual citizenship Bolivian and with Mercosur agreements a Bolivian can live in Peru as resident, what are the benefits if any?
    Thanks
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 10/06/2022
      @Carmen Hello Carmen,

      Officially, you can apply for a resident visa either at a Peruvian consulate abroad or in Peru at Migraciones. But, especially in countries, whose nationals can enter Peru visa-free, such as the US, consulates often won’t accept resident visa application or aren’t very accommodating and tell applicants to enter Peru as a tourist and then change their immigration status in Peru. So, best check with the Peruvian consulate general in Dallas if they process resident visa applications, in your case the application for a rentista visa. If you apply in Peru, the processing time at the moment is anything between 4 to 6 months.

      When you apply for a "residencia temporal por acuerdo Mercosur" you get a temporary residency valid for 2 years. During these two years, you have to be in Peru at least 183 days in a year. After that you can change to a permanent residency, which is permanent if you aren’t outside Peru for more than 365 days. Additionally, you are allowed to work.

      On a rentista visa you are not allowed to work in Peru. You have an indefinite permit of residence as long as you are in Peru at least 183 days per year. You can’t change to a permanent residency.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Nico · 13/05/2022
    Possible to be naturalized in Peru - via a Rentista visa/CE? I've heard multiple answers... from 'no'... to 'you have to make a salary in Peru first (pay taxes)'. Unsure what is the truth?

    -Even possible from a Rentista?
    -2 yr wait ????
    -If so... easy to file myself or best to hire an attorney?

    Anything else to be aware of?

    Thanks so much!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 13/05/2022
      @Nico Hello Nico,

      I don’t know if foreigners living on a rentista visa in Peru can apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization. I think, no.

      Have a look into the Ley de Nacionalidad 26574 article 3b. There you find that foreigners who want to apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization have to “exercise a profession, art, trade or business (“Ejercer regularmente profesión, arte, oficio o actividad impresarial.”); there are a couple of exceptions from this rule, for example, for foreign spouses of Peruvians and professional athletes, but as far as I could find not for rentistas. As you are not allowed to work, pursue a career, and earn any money in Peru on a rentista visa, you can’t fulfil this requirement.

      The Nationality Law is from 1996, but still valid even though it was updated many times. The latest update was last year with the Supreme Decree 022-2021-INM but, as far as I know, article 3 was never changed.

      Additionally, check out above mentioned Supreme Decree article 9 (page 35 of the pdf which is page 53 of the document). There you find the current requirements to apply for the Peruvian nationality by naturalization: among them 2 years of legal residency in the country and proof of at least 10 UITs monthly income (in 2022 that’s S/ 46,000). Starting with “h” requirements are listed according to the migratory status. Unfortunately, there as well rentista isn’t mentioned.

      So, I don’t think you can apply for Peruvian nationality if you live in Peru on a rentista visa. However, I might be wrong, might have misinterpreted the law or missed an exception somewhere. So, as the rentista visa is a special case in many ways, if you want a 100% correct answer, your best bet is to either contact an immigration lawyer or even better Migraciones.

      Sorry.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Sean R · 02/05/2022
    I do not see anything about health insurance or what the options are for healthcare in Peru. Can you point me in the correct direction? :) Thank you
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/05/2022
      @Sean R Hello Sean,

      Depending on your age, finding health insurance might be an issue.

      While you can get public health insurance (EsSalud) as a foreign resident which might not be the best choice, in my opinion the way to go is a private health insurance, however if you are over 65 or 70 it’s difficult to find a provider willing to take you on, over 75 it’s nearly impossible. Often pre-existing conditions are excluded.

      A good point to look for your options is QuePlan.pe, a website that, after you entered your personal data, compares suitable health plans from different insurance companies. You get a quick overview of the different plans and approximate costs.

      Among the best private health insurances are Pacifico, Rimac and Mapfre.

      Another good option is to check out private hospitals. They all offer their own health plans.

      And another option would be to check out international expat / global health insurance providers covering Peru.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sean R · 02/05/2022
      @Sunflower Eva, thanks for your reply. it is useful. the reason i ask is that will have to have an operation in 12 years that will allow me to live another 12 to 15 years. Maybe peru isnt the best to retire in at age 62 with heart disease.

      Thanks,
      Sean
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 03/05/2022
      @Sean R Good morning Sean,

      You could be right, Peru might not be the best choice; or it might be exactly what you need for a beneficial lifestyle and you just have to find the right doctor and clinic to do necessary check-ups, prescriptions, or whatever you need and who probably even can operate on you when the time comes.

      In Peru, and especially in Lima there are some excellent doctors and well equipped private clinics additionally offering a phenomenal service. The Clinica San Pablo, for example, has its own well respected heart institute. Or Cardiomedic, also a well-known cardiac institute. So, there are options for you.

      Some people with pre-existing conditions which aren't or only partly covered by their Peruvian private health insurance, pay necessary medication and examinations out of their pocket (as they are much more affordable than in North America or Europe), but keep their health insurance in their home country and if needed or too expensive, fly back for special treatments or operations.

      Anyway, I wish you all the best.

      Greetings
      Eva

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