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criminal-background-check-for-resident-visa-application-peru2

International document corresponding to the Antecedentes policiales, penales and judiciales in Peru

What you need, where you get it and what to watch out for

One of the requirements to apply for a resident visa in Peru or to change your visa type, for example from a work visa to a permanent resident visa, are the “Antecedentes policiales, penales y judiciales” from your home country or from the country where you legally lived (so with a resident visa) during the 5 years prior to coming to Peru showing that you don't have a record.

Many foreigners have no idea what the required “Antecedentes” are, what they correspond to in their home country and how to get them. So, here an attempt at explanation. And while I surely don’t know the correct name of the required document in all languages nor the procedure to get it for all countries in the world, I hope I at least can point everyone in the right direction.

Content Overview

What are the Peruvian Antecedentes policiales, penales y judiciales?

The Peruvian Antecedents policiales, penales y judiciales are three different types of police / criminal record checks:

  • Antecedentes Policiales are a Peruvian Police Clearance Certificate indicating if a person has registered encounters with the police, was involved in any criminal activities or is investigated.
  • Antecedentes Penales are a Peruvian Criminal Record Check showing if a person was ever convicted of a crime in a Peruvian court; so, it’s an official document of the criminal history of a person limited to actual convictions.
  • Antecedentes Judiciales are a Peruvian Judicial Background Record showing if a person has been incarcerated in any Peruvian jail or has done community service as part of a sentence.

For more detailed information about the three different Peruvian background checks and how to get them for the time you lived in Peru, have a look at our article “Police Clearance Certificate and Criminal Background Check in Peru”

Foreigners, who have lived or are still living in Peru, as well as Peruvians quite often have to provide a police clearance certificate or a crimin...

Anyway, for your resident visa application or for changing your visa type in Peru, you need the criminal record from your home country or from the country where you legally lived (so with a resident visa) during the 5 years prior to coming to Peru showing that you don't have a record.

Be aware while that's the official requirement, Migraciones always (!) requests the criminal record check from your home country. And, if they are made aware of the fact that you lived in another country during the 5 years prior to coming to Peru, sometimes additionally a check from this country.

What kind of record check does Migraciones accept?

Most countries around the globe do not have this tripartite record check system. So, as your home country won’t issue these three documents as in Peru, you simply can’t meet this requirement to the full satisfaction of Migraciones.

While shortly after the introduction of the Antecedentes requirement in 2021 Migraciones rejected quite a few police clearance, criminal record and good-conduct certificates submitted by visa applicants, because they supposedly didn’t meet the requirement which is based on the Peruvian system, the Peruvian immigration authority quickly went through a learning curve and now accepts (criminal / background) record checks or any type of no criminal record certificates that were issued by the highest federal police, judicial or national-security authority responsible for such matters in your home country.

The name of this document varies from country to country, so make sure you get an official document proving the lack of any police, criminal or judicial record; a simple national police check isn’t enough and won’t be accepted.

If you are not sure which document in your home country is accepted, check below or, if you don’t find your home country in our list, best check with the Peruvian consulate.

Some tips and recommendations

  • We highly recommend applying for your background check while you are still in your home country / country of residence. Applying from abroad, so, for example, while already being in Peru, is often difficult, time consuming and more expensive or impossible. The embassy or consulate of your home country in Peru in most cases cannot help you with getting the criminal record check, though there are exceptions.
  • One of the obstacles when you try to get your record check while already being outside your home country, for some nationalities is that you must provide a current fingerprint card which must include rolled and flat impressions of all ten fingers, your full name and date of birth and the seal/stamp of the police agency and the signature of the official taking the fingerprints. In Lima, for example, this can be done at the National Police Complex (Direccion de Criminalistica PNP) on Av. Aramburu 550; in Cusco one of our readers informed us that you can get fingerprinted at the Policia Nacional del Peru, DIVINCRI PNP, Oficina de Criminalistica Cusco (a building behind the big police headquarters in Plaza Tupaq Amaru)
  • When you apply for the document in your home country, make sure it’s for “international use", "for use abroad", "for use for a visa application in a foreign country”, or similar.
  • Make sure that the issuing authority authenticates the document; so, the record check has a signature and a seal or stamp of the issuing authority which is necessary for the further required authentication / legalization process.
  • After you received your record check, you have to get an Apostille on it, or, if your home country didn’t sign the Hague Apostille Convention have to get a traditional legalization. This can only be done in the country where the document was issued! In some countries, you can request from the issuing authority that they forward your record check to the authority responsible for the Apostille, which usually saves you time, shipping costs and lots of stress.
  • In some countries, service providers offer to handle all the red tape to get your record check and/or get the Apostille / legalization. Especially, if you are already outside your home country, it might be wise and a good investment to use such a service. Just make sure the company you use is approved and certified. In some countries, it’s even obligatory to use such service providers at one point or the other.
  • In case your record check is in a foreign language, it has to be translated into Spanish. Do not get it done in your home country!!! Translations from any language into Spanish are only accepted if they are done by a certified translator, a so-called traductor publico juramentado, in Peru! You find lists of these government-approved translators on the Peruvian government website. Just click under point 3 on the language of your original document and the list of translators for your language appears.

Document corresponding to the Peruvian "antecedentes" by country

So, after this general introduction find below information for the most common nationalities that apply for resident visas in Peru on what document Migraciones meets the “Antecedents policales, penales y judiciales” requirement and where / how you can apply for it.

As already mentioned above, we don’t know the correct name of the required document in all languages nor the procedure to get it for all countries in the world. Sorry! If you don’t find your nationality below, I hope we could at least point you in the right direction and give you some useful recommendations. If you already went through the process of getting the correct document in your home country, please share your experience; great would be the name of the document, who is in charge of issuing it and any other info you are willing to share. Thank you.

United States

Officially (!!!), US nationals need an “FBI Criminal Record Check” or an “Identity History Summary” which is done in the US by the Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). You find more information about the application process on the website of the US Department of State or on the FBI website. Once issued the document must be apostilled by the US Department of State.

However, over the past few weeks some of our readers informed me that Migraciones as well accepted a background check issued by their home state, of course with Apostille, and their resident visa application was approved without any problems.

Getting a state background check is usually much quicker, easier and cheaper, in some states can be done online and/or without having to provide fingerprints. Additionally, as this document is issued by your state (not the federal government), it doesn't have to be apostilled by the US Department of State, which sometimes takes ages, but can only be apostilled by the state's Secretary of State, which in most states only takes a few days or a week or two. So, if you are pressed for time (and/or money) and/or if you are already in Peru this option might be worth a shot and a much easier and quicker way to get an apostilled background check.

One of our readers was so nice and explained which steps are involved in getting a state background check (thank you so much Mike!). Here what he wrote:

1. Order a notarized background check from your state's law enforcement agency. It is likely you can do this online and have it mailed to you, or directly to the state's Secretary of State.

2. Get the background check apostilled. Since this is a document issued by your state (not the federal government), it can only be apostilled by the state's Secretary of State. I was able to take it into their office and it was apostilled while I waited. Most states also offer the option to service requests via mail.

3. Once in Peru, have it translated to Spanish. It must be done by a translator who is "juramentado" (most official, but more expensive and slower) or "colegiado" (faster and cheaper). I went with colegiado and still don't really understand why there are 3 different levels of translation available in this country.

If you are already in Peru and want to get an FBI background check, read the experience Vaughn, an US national who already was in Peru when he applied for his FBI background check and the Apostille, send me, which I happily share, and which hopefully is helpful to others:

Dear Eva,

With two days remaining on my tourist visa my residency papers were submitted to Migraciones, which means that the visa limit is no longer applicable. The biggest reason for the delay was being so clueless about how to obtain an FBI report and apostillle, and I'm grateful to you for pointing me in the right direction. Whatever activities those Embassy folks may be up to inside their fortress out in Surco, providing useful information evidently has a low priority. To make life easier for some of your readers, I've drafted a summary of how the process works and am sending it along.

This is a two-step process that involves first obtaining the FBI report, and then the apostille, a cover sheet signed and sealed by a government official that validates a document for use in foreign countries. You can either request a report directly from the Bureau or use an FBI Channeler, a company that will deal with the Bureau on your behalf. I chose the latter because it seemed simpler, doesn't cost much more ($50 vs something like $20) and provides a phone contact for handling questions. From a Channeler list I picked one based on cost and expected turn-around time.

They emailed printable instructions and five items to be retuned: a general information form, a form for your M/C or Visa information, and a checklist of necessary items, plus two FBI fingerprint forms to take to the police. (It´s OK to use regular copier paper for these.) Fingerprinting is done at a station on Avenida Aramburu a block west of the Via Expresa, and the fingerprint section is located around the corner on the west side of the building. There was no charge for this, but he sure someone there puts their stamp and signature on each of the forms. Next you need to send the forms back to the Channeler via DHL. At the time their location in Miraflores (700 block of Benavides) had a $45 special for sending documents to the U.S. (Note: there's a guy on the corner-been there for years-who sells great empanadas.)

A few days after receiving your DHL packet they will email your FBI report, which you can then forward to one of the Apostille services. Again there is a list to pick from and I chose one based on the same criteria. The cost was $125 for the service plus $50 for sending back the Apostilled report via DHL. It came in about four weeks, which was what they had estimated.

These documents will then have to be translated into Spanish and the Apostille service I used offered to take care of this, as I imagine they all do. However, I decided to have this done here figuring there was less likelihood of a problem using a translator certified in Peru as opposed to one based overseas. What you will end up with is a stack of papers with the FBI report on the bottom, the Apostille on top of that, the translation on top of that, and on top of everything the translator´s cover sheet with their information, credentials, etc.

Good luck with this and don't forget the empanadas. After all is done and the final payment has been debited to your account, you can also try visiting the Jockey Club on Avenida Larco. You've long known what comes out of the back end of a bull, and at this point you'll also be aware that you have purchased a bureaucratic pile of it for roughly $300. Studying a Racing Form is a good antidote for these unpleasant thoughts, particularly if you do it in a place that serves Miraflores beer at La Victoria prices.

Note: The services used for this did a good job and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend them.

FBI Channeler. Accurate Biommetrics, Itasca, Illinois. (866) 361-9944. Info [at] accuratebiometrics [dot] com
Apostille. Southeast Spanish, Inc. Knoxville, Tennessee. (877) 374-0005. dan.hickman [at] sespanish [dot] com
Translation service (Peru) Peter Spence. (511) 453 2514/(51) 999 190 882. Spencetraducciones [at] gmail [dot] com

Canada

Canadian nationals need a “Certified Criminal Record Check” which is issued in Canada by the Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCPM). You find more information about the application process on the website of the RCMP. Here the RMCP step-by-step guide. Once issued the document must be apostilled.

One of our readers shared how he got his Canadian Criminal Record Check while already being in Peru. Here what he wrote:

I just finished the Canadian criminal record check process entirely from Peru, and wanted to share the latest procedure:

Choose a notary in Canada that can digitalize and send your fingerprints and personal data to the RCMP on your behalf. I used Red Seal Notary and was very happy with their service. They will have a list of documents and information they need from you- notarized copies of passport and other Canadian ID document, passport style photo, credit card form, etc.

Make sure you specify you need the police check including the signature from the Ottawa Criminal Real Time director.

Print 2 copies of the RCMP fingerprint form and take them to the DIRINCRI office at Av Aramburu 550 (this is around the corner from the main police station door, you will see people waiting on a small patio for the Peruvian police checks). I asked nicely to the officer at reception if he could take my fingerprints for an international check, and he did so right away and there was no charge. Make sure to tell them you need the rolled fingerprints and read the form before to direct them, as the officer may not be familiar with the format.

Collect the rest of your documents and mail (registered courier like DHL is best) to the notary service in Canada. They will upload your details and send to the RCMP. I received email confirmation within about 10 days that they had my police check back, and it took about another 3-4 days for DHL to deliver my document in Lima.

Now that Canada is officially part of the Apostille Convention, you can make an appointment at the Canadian embassy in Lima to receive the Apostille for your RCMP check. You can make the appointments online in advance here under Notarial Services.

Translators: I asked around to several and used Maria del Carmen Buendia for the translation.

UK

UK passport holders need an ACRO police certificate which is issued by the National Police Chiefs' Council's Criminal Records Office. You find more information about the application process, which can be done online on the website of the Acro Criminal Records Office. Once issued the document must be apostilled.

Australia

Australians need a “National Police Clearance Certificate (NPC) for criminal records that cover all Australian states and territories” which is issued in Australia by the Australian Federal Police (AFP). You find detailed information about the application process on the website of the AFP. Once issued the document must be apostilled.

New Zealand

New Zealand passport holders need a Criminal Record Check issued by the Ministry of Justice. Once issued the document must be apostilled.

Here what our reader Martin shared about the process:

'Ministry of Justice' 'Criminal Record Check'
https://www.police.govt.nz/faq/how-do-i-get-a-police-clearance-certificate
If you are asked for a ‘police clearance certificate’, ‘police record’, ‘police file’, ‘police check’, or ‘criminal check’, a copy of your criminal record from the Ministry of Justice should meet the requirements. If you have no convictions, you will receive a letter stating that is the case.
https://www.justice.govt.nz/criminal-records/
https://www.criminalrecords.govt.nz/
Request a free New Zealand Criminal Record Check
which is emailed to you within three working days.

Department of Internal Affairs 'Apostille'
https://www.govt.nz/browse/passports-citizenship-and-identity/proving-and-protecting-your-identity/use-your-nz-documents-overseas/
https://www.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Passports-citizenship-and-identity/Request-a-document-authentication-or-apostille.pdf
The New Zealand 'Department of Internal Affairs' will verify your electronic 'Criminal Record Check' directly with the 'Ministry of Justice'. You can apply and pay for a Paper Apostille (edit sunflower: which you need for Peru) or e-Apostille which is couriered to a New Zealand address or an overseas address. New Zealand Apostille processing time is approximately seven working days.

Germany

Germans need a "Führungszeugnis Verwendung Ausland“ (criminal record certificate for use aboard). Those who are still in Germany can apply for it at their Meldebehörde. Once issued the document must be apostilled.

For those who are already abroad the Bundesamt für Justiz (Federal Office of Justice) is in charge and issues the document. You find detailed information on the website of the Bundesamt für Justiz.

Be aware that since January 1, 2023 the Bundesamt für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten is responsible to put an Apostille on documents issued by Bundesministerien. And unfortunately, once the Führungszeugnis is apostilled, the BfAA only sends it to a German address. The website of the BfAA explains the whole process nicely (see under subpoint "Wichtige Hinweise für Führungszeugnisse").

Austria

Austrians need a "Strafregisterauszug“ (criminal record certificate). While the Landespolizeidirektion Wien (Federal Police Bureau Vienna) is responsible for keeping the register, the certificate is issued depending where you live by different police departments. You can as well apply online. Once issued the document must be apostilled. And the good news, if you are already in Peru, the Austrian consulate is in charge.

Russia

Russians need a Certificate of no criminal record (in Russian this should be the “Spravka o nalichii (otsutstvii) sudimosti” - Certificate of presence (absence) of a criminal record). If you are still in Russia, you can apply in person at your regional Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs or at your local Multifunctional Service Center. Once issued the document must be apostilled. If you are already outside Russia, you can apply in person at the Consular Section of the nearest Russian Embassy (bring your Russian passport and, if you are a foreigner who lived in Russia, proof of your (former) residency).

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  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bri · 14/06/2024
    Hi, I am looking for more information on Vaughn's experience under the United States section.I couldn't seem to locate the place recommended by where Vaughn did their fingerprints "at a station on Avenida Aramburu a block west of the Via Expresa, and the fingerprint section is located around the corner on the west side of the building". Does this place have a name or address or phone number? Thank you!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/06/2024
      @Bri
      Hello Bri,

      that should be the National Police Complex (Direccion de Criminalistica PNP) on Av. Aramburu 550 in Surquillo, Lima.

      Hope this helps.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Chip · 08/05/2024
    I went through the INTERPOL process yesterday, and it was a little different from what you explained above. This is in Arequipa, btw, oh, and I'm from the US. One, they provided a black pen. Two, if you mess up while filling in your form(s) (and scratch out anything you wrote) they will make you do it all over again with a new form(s), but you only get one do-over, if you mess up your second form(s) your appt is canceled and you have to start all over with a new appt. Three, at the end they put the appropriate docs/fingerprints into a manila envelope, addressed it to the FBI, and tell you to go to the PeruPost location (1 block away), and you have to pay to have it sent, then you take the receipt back and give it to the INTERPOL guys. They record the info and give it back to you. So, sending the docs to the FBI was not an option. They then gave me the Ficha de Canje doc and said I could start the Immigration application as soon as I wanted, meaning without waiting for the FBI docs. That's where I am now, but I do have to get ahold of Social Security and get their apostilled benefits letter.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 08/05/2024
      @Chip
      Hello Chip,

      thank you so much for sharing your experience.

      The article above is about the criminal record check from your home country, not the Ficha de Canje from Interpol Peru.

      In our Ficha de Canje article you will find not only an explanation how to apply (sorry, never heard that they cancel the appointment if you fill out the form wrong and the exact procedures vary a bit from Interpol office to Interpol office) but also a note that in some Interpol offices, mostly in the provinces, they now require, especially US citizens, to send the documentation for the additional check to the FBI during the appointment.

      Anyway, you made it and now have your Ficha de Canje. I hope you can quickly sort out your social security letter with Apostille as the Ficha is only good for 3 months. If you need help with the application for your, I assume, rentista visa, check out our Retirement visa article.

      Thanks again and all the best.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    CanadianinLima · 28/03/2024
    Hi all, I just finished the Canadian criminal record check process entirely from Peru, and wanted to share the latest procedure:

    1. Choose a notary in Canada that can digitalize and send your fingerprints and personal data to the RCMP on your behalf. I used Red Seal Notary and was very happy with their service. They will have a list of documents and information they need from you- notarized copies of passport and other Canadian ID document, passport style photo, credit card form, etc. https://www.redsealnotary.com/services/rcmp-fingerprints-outside-canada/

    Make sure you specify you need the police check including the signature from the Ottawa Criminal Real Time director. 

    2. Print 2 copies of the RCMP fingerprint form and take them to the DIRINCRI office at Av Aramburu 550 (this is around the corner from the main police station door, you will see people waiting on a small patio for the Peruvian police checks). I asked nicely to the officer at reception if he could take my fingerprints for an international check, and he did so right away and there was no charge. Make sure to tell them you need the rolled fingerprints and read the form before to direct them, as the officer may not be familiar with the format.  

    3. Collect the rest of your documents and mail (registered courier like DHL is best) to the notary service in Canada. They will upload your details and send to the RCMP. I received email confirmation within about 10 days that they had my police check back, and it took about another 3-4 days for DHL to deliver my document in Lima. 

    4. Now that Canada is officially part of the Apostille Convention, you can make an appointment at the Canadian embassy in Lima to receive the Apostille for your RCMP check. You can make the appointments online in advance here under Notarial Services: https://www.international.gc.ca/country-pays/peru-perou/lima-info.aspx?lang=eng#NS

    https://www.consulado.pe/paginas/traductores.aspx I asked around to several and used Maria del Carmen Buendia: 

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/03/2024
      @CanadianinLima
      Hello Canadian in Lima,

      wow!!! Thank you so much for sharing this super detailed explanation. I'm sure this will help many Canadians, who are in the same boat.

      I will add this to the article above.

      Again, thanks a lot.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    alexandre boisvert · 09/11/2023
    Hello I got a question regarding the criminal background check. I am canadian and in canada we have two different background check. One that you need fingerprints taken and another that you dont. The one that you dont need fingerprints taken specifies that it is for visa applications and work permits outside of canada. Will this be accepted by migraciones in Peru? I am currently in Peru. Talked to a lawyer and he told me it needed to be aproved by the peruvian embassy in canada before shipping it to Peru. Could you confirm this! Thank you!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 10/11/2023
      @alexandre boisvert
      Hello Alex,

      sorry for getting back to you so late. We had a problem with our comment system, which hopefully is fixed now.

      As a Canadian you need a Certified Criminal Record Check, which is with fingerprints. Under this RCMP link you find the details on how you can get it when you are outside Canada.

      Regarding the Apostille / legalization: until recently Canada was not a member of the Hague Apostille Convention, which meant that documents had to go through a traditional legalization process in Canada and as last step had to be legalized by a Peruvian consulate. In May 2023, Canada finally joined the Apostille Convention, which will come into effect on January 1, 2024.

      So, if you need the Certified Criminal Record Check now / as soon as possible you will have to get it legalized by the corresponding authorities in Canada and the Peruvian consulate in Canada. Once in Peru, the document then has to be translated into Spanish and authenticated by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

      If you can wait until January, the Certified Criminal Record Check just must get an Apostille in Canada. Once in Peru it has to be translated by a certified translator, a so-called traductor publico juramentado and then is accepted by Migraciones.

      Sorry again for my late reply.

      Greetings
      Eva

    • This commment is unpublished.
      alexandre boisvert · 11/11/2023
      @Sunflower Thanks!
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mike · 02/11/2023
    Hey eva, this might be a silly question, but does this document in my case an acro police certificate from the UK, need to be legalised in Peru or solely translated? I already have it apostilled in the UK.

    Thank you!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/11/2023
      @Mike
      Hello Mike,

      no, it's not a silly question, especially if you are not familiar with how things work in Peru.

      Unfortunately, you haven't mentioned for which visa you want to apply in Peru. So, best check out our Visa Guide and first click on the visa that applies. While reading through the complete ??? visa article will be helpful on your way to residency and your carné, to answer your question in detail select in the "Content overview menu" the point "Last steps before your ??? visa application in Peru".

      As it's the same for all foreign documents used in Peru and for all visas, here as an example the corresponding chapter in our Family visa article.

      In short, if you use a certified translator in Peru, a so-called traductor publico juramentado, to get your foreign document with Apostille translated, then an additional legalization by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs shouldn't be needed, but Migraciones still sometimes requests it.

      Confusing? Yes. Sorry. Welcome to Peru.

      Greetings
      Eva


    • This commment is unpublished.
      Mike · 02/11/2023
      @Sunflower Hi Eva, thanks so much for your reply. I am married to a Peruvian so applying for a family visa. Appreciate the help.

      Could I ask you one more question? I've applied for the visa and submitted everything but the above police certificate which I'm still waiting for and had a response in the buzon electronico today. It says

      "Tengo el agrado de dirigirme a usted, en atención al documento de referencia mediante el cual se generó su CAMBIO
      DE CALIDAD MIGRATORIA iniciado con expediente administrativo N° , la misma que ha sido
      observada por el siguiente motivo:

      2-Partida de nacimiento que demuestre vinculo filial con el solicitante legalizada por el Consulado peruano y por el
      Ministerio Relaciones Exteriores o apostillada.

      Plazo: 5 días."

      I'm confused by this because I am applying for a visa via marriage, and I'm sure I selected it correctly because when I go to subsanacion it gives the option to upload a marriage certificate and not a birth certificate.  I will follow your guide to apply for an extension, but I'm wondering if I need to do something about being asked for a document that I shouldn't need? I did only submit the marriage certificate a few days ago via subsanacion and this is after I began the visa process.

      Thank you
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/11/2023
      @Mike
      Hello Mike,

      yes, I understand why you are confused; me too. 

      If you apply for a family visa based an being married to a Peruvian you don't need a birth certificate proving your family ties but your marriage certificate. 

      So, are you sure you applied for the Cambio de calidad migratoria familiar residente casado con peruana? If so, I assume that someone at Migraciones sent the wrong form letter. Nevertheless, personally I would get in contact with Migraciones and ask them what's going on. It can be difficult to talk to someone in person but your best chance is using the Video conference option on the Agencia Digital. How it's done is explained in our Migraciones article under Start a video conference with Migraciones.

      But I wonder why they would send a notification stating the birth certificate is wrong (which belongs in the same category as the marriage certificate) and not your criminal record check. Are you sure your marriage certificate is to their requirements? 

      Where did you register your marriage? At a Peruvian consulate? Then you need a certified copy of your marriage certificate issued at the consulate, which must be legalized by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before Migraciones accept it. As it's already in Spanish no translation needed. Or at Reniec in Peru, then you just need a certified copy issued by Reniec. So, no problems to be expected here. Or the notification overlapped with your uploading of the marriage certificate (you uploaded it after you applied)?

      Anyway, yes, as said before I would contact Migraciones to clear this point, but as you are still waiting for your criminal record check, which you will need anyway, you should apply for the extension of the Migraciones deadline shortly before the 5 days are over to avoid any problems.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Mike · 02/11/2023
      @Sunflower Hi Eva, thanks for your detailed reply.

      On the agencia digital on the left hand side, under 'cambio de calidad migratoria' all options are available except for 'casado con una peruana', and again on the agencia digital under 'subsanacion' it asks for 'Para el Casado (a) con peruano (a): Acta o partida de matrimonio' and nothing about partida de nacimiento.

      We were married in a notary in Lima, and it is registered with the Reniec. I downloaded the PDF of the marriage certifiacate from Reniec and uploaded that. I applied for the visa on the 12th October but didn't upload my ficha or marriage certificate until the end of the month. The spouse DNI is updated and I have uploaded everything besides the police certificate, which I will do next week once it is translated.

      Thank you!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 02/11/2023
      @Mike
      OK, so your marriage certificate shouldn't be the problem. And you don't need a birth certificate for the Cambio de calidad migratoria familiar residente casado/a con peruano/a.

      I really assume that someone accidentally sent the wrong form letter to notify you that one document is missing / doesn't have an Apostille. 

      Nevertheless, I would have a chat with them just to make sure and as you won't get the Acro check with Apostille and translation within the next 5 days apply for the extension of the deadline.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Ray · 03/10/2023
    On the FBI site, I’m seeing the notice pasted further below (and was informed the same by email via the channeler Vaughn recommended above). Do we know if this is a recent update or if there’s still a work-around for getting this Channeler support to secure the FBI background check while living in Peru?  “An FBI-Approved Channeler may only process requests for a U.S. citizen or U.S. lawful permanent resident located in the U.S. or its territories.”
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 04/10/2023
      @Ray
      Hello Ray,

      honestly, I don't know.

      There have been many US citizens already being in Peru and using a channeler to get their FBI check over the past two years. So, if this is a new thing and enforced, that would be a bummer.

      Personally, I would contact every channeler listed on the FBI website and see what they have to say. I just checked a few websites of the FBI approved channelers and most only refer to US citizens living in the US, no mention of US nationals already being abroad. 

      However, for example, on the website of fastfingerprints you can read this "An FBI-approved Channeler may only process requests for a U.S. person (an individual who is a citizen of the U.S. or a lawful permanent resident of the U.S.)" (which makes sense) and "Results must be sent back to a US address. Results are prohibited from being shipped overseas". Here no mention that you must be located in the US.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Diego Pinto · 26/06/2023
    Hi Eva! Thanks a lot for all the guides! I have a question

    My girlfriend is from Russia and in the middle of the process to get her work visa. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/06/2023
      @Diego Pinto
      Hello Diego,

      Great that LimaEasy could help with the work visa application of your girlfriend.

      But what's your question? How can I help?

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bill Fitzgerald · 22/06/2023
    Hi, Lima Easy. 

    If you are in Peru and are doing the fingerprint card for the FBI Background check, what do you put for the ORI section?

    According to the story of the person who applied for the FBI background check while in Peru, they were able to fill out the fingerprint card, but it doesn't say what they put for the ORI.

    Do you know what to put there? 

    Please let me know. 

    Thanks! 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/06/2023
      @Bill Fitzgerald
      Hello Bill,

      no, I haven't got a clue which number to fill in there.

      Probably, best ask at the office where you get your fingerprints taken. Hopefully, they know. Or, if you use a channeler, they might know what number you have to fill in when you get your fingerprints taken abroad. 

      Sorry.
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/06/2023
      @Bill Fitzgerald Bill, I just read that the ORI number is left empty if you are not using an agency for fingerprinting.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Aaron · 12/06/2023
    Hi Lima Easy!

    Thanks for an incredibly informative website, you've helped me so much!

    I have a question:

    I'm in the process of applying for Peruvian family visa, and from what I understand, the Interpol check costs more for Aussies because Interpol have to contact the AFP for an extra check, but I already have the AFP police check done, which is apostilled with a certified and legalised translation.

    What do I do in this case? Can I take this legalised document to Interpol? Does anything change or will they want to do another check anyway because "beuracracy"?

    I'm hoping that all that is left will be the Interpol check and they won't need to do the AFP checks.

    Kind regards,
    Aaron.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/06/2023
      @Aaron Hello Aaron,

      Thank you so much for your nice words about LimaEasy. It’s always great to hear that our website is helpful.

      First of all, the Ficha de Canje, which you get from Interpol in Peru, costs the same for all foreign nationals, S/ 31.50.

      The money order, which Australians, US Americans and Canadians have to present at Interpol, is for an additional check that the countries of these nationals require (a relic from the past, which should have been eliminated years ago). Anyway, while the money order is needed, the results of this additional check are not necessary to get the Ficha de Canje from Interpol and for your family visa application on the Migraciones Agencia Digital.

      On the other hand, already having a criminal record check won’t exempt you from required money order. So no, Interpol Peru won’t accept your Australian criminal record check. You only need your Australian criminal record check for your visa application.

      Interpol Peru staff has instructions to request from Australian nationals next to the general requirements as well the money order. So, get required documents for the Ficha de Canje including the money order and an appointment at Interpol. When you have your Interpol appointment, you must present all requirements. Then you, as an Australian are fingerprinted twice, must fill in some form in English and are told to send this form and one of the fingerprint cards with the international money order to the Australian Federal Police.

      Before leaving Interpol you get the Ficha de Canje and, if you have all other required documents, can immediately apply for your visa as explained in our Family visa article.

      I highly recommend reading above chapter Additional record check for US, Canadian and Australian citizens to the end. There an Australian shared his experience, which might be more than helpful for you.

      Greetings
      Eva

  • This commment is unpublished.
    Monica · 05/06/2023
    Hi Eva,
    For a foreign married in Peru with a peruvian, they need to present the birth certificate for the family visa? if it is the case, they accept legalized copies?

    Thanks for your help!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 05/06/2023
      @Monica
      Hello Monica,

      all foreign documents that Peruvian authorities require from applicants need an Apostille or, if the country in which they were issued, didn't sign the Apostille Convention have to be legalized by a Peruvian consulate abroad and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Peru. Once in Peru, the document has to be translated into Spanish and in some cases legalized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. So, a simple legalized copy isn't enough.

      But, if you are applying for a family visa (make a so-called cambio de calidad migratoria familiar residente) based on being married to a Peruvian, you do not need your birth certificate at all. Among other documents you need your Peruvian marriage certificate.

      You find a list of all requirements, an introduction into the necessary preparation work and a step-by-step guide of the application process in our article Family Visa.

      Greetings
      Eva


  • This commment is unpublished.
    Ito · 14/05/2023
    Hi Eva!
    Your blog is great, i’ve got all informations from here and thank you so much.
    Can i ask one question about the police clearance certificate from abroad? I used to study and working other countries few years ago and i had residence permits there, then i decided to back to my home country, so the residence permits has been cancelled. I lived in my home country until i come to Peru, i brought the police clearance certificate from my home country but im not sure if is it necessary to get police clearance certificate from the countries which i used to stayed? It seems difficult to get it because it is far plus i wasn’t living there anymore and I don’t have residency there now.
    Thanks!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/05/2023
      @Ito
      Hello Ito,

      thank you so much for your nice words about LimaEasy. You made my day!

      One requirement for all residence visas is to present the “Antecedentes policiales, penales y judiciales” from your home country or from the country where you legally lived (so with a resident visa) during the 5 years prior to coming to Peru. That’s the law.

      However, Migraciones always requests the criminal record check from your home country. And, if they are made aware of the fact that the foreigner lived in another country during the 5 yea rs prior to coming to Peru, sometimes as well a check from this country.

      So, the question is how Migraciones knows where you lived in the past 5 years. They only know if you tell them. But nowhere during the application they ask if you lived in another country than your home country during the past 5 years.

      During your application, you must fill in the “Data update questionnaire”. There are two questions about this topic: 1. Did you previously reside in other countries? It’s up to you, if you answer this question honestly. However, personally I don’t see a problem with answering this question with yes, as no time period is mentioned. 2. In which country did you reside before arriving in Peru? Here as well you can answer honestly filling in your home country.

      Overall, in your case answering honestly shouldn’t cause any problems. And uploading the record check from your home country with Apostille (or legalization) and translation should be enough to satisfy Migraciones requirement for the Antecedentes. But be aware that Migraciones has the right to request additional documents at any time.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Ito · 16/05/2023
      @Sunflower Hi Eva!
      There is one question, i don’t know if migraciones will ask me to submit my passport and do some check on my original passport, for example to see if there is any resident visa? 

      Thank you!

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 18/05/2023
      @Ito Hello Ito,

      when you apply for your residence visa you have to upload a copy of your passport, but only the page with your personal information and the page with the entry stamp. That's it. And when you have to visit Migraciones for your biometric data appointment or when you pick up your foreigner ID only the page with the personal data is checked to confirmed your identity.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Maria · 23/03/2023
    Does anyone know if there’s a time frame on when Migraciones will not accept the background check? I just got the background check done on March 23,2023 but it’s going to take at least 6 weeks to apostille it with the US state dept. i’m worried that Migraciones will reject my documents?! Please help! Also if anyone has an updated list of requirements to change my status from tourist visa through marriage please post the link! Migraciones website is not updated and they never answer the phone or website appointments! Sorry for the lengthy post but i’m in limbo with this bureaucracy! 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/03/2023
      @Maria
      Hello Maria,

      unfortunately Migraciones hasn't published how old a background check can be to be accepted. So, I assume that the usual time frame applies, which is a max of 6 months for documents issued outside the country. So, you shouldn't have a problem.

      And we have a quite extensive and always up-to-date Visa Guide here an LimaEasy and dedicated one article to the Family Visa. Read it and relax. There you find everything you need to know about the whole topic, including the requirements and a step-by-step guide of the complete application process. And even though at first everything seems to be confusing, follow the guide step by step and you will be fine.

      All the best.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Tania · 12/03/2023
    Just wanted  to share our experience with the FBI background check. You go on to the FBI website and register. Then choose a location to get the finger prints done. We chose a main Post Office branch in our area. Once the appointment was finished we were told we should get the results back in a few days but we actually received an email with a

    For the Apostille the website said approximately 8 - 10 weeks due to the fact that since the pandemic everything must be done by mail. For us it took exactly 2 months. You can do the process on your own or use a channeler (the FBI website has a list of recommended agencies). If you do it yourself you print out the pdf of the report and send it by mail. If you use a channeler you email 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/03/2023
      @Tania
      Hello Tania,

      thank you for sharing your experience with getting the FBI check and Apostille when still being in the US.

      It's incredible how long processing times are at the moment. And this applies to lots of other countries as well.

      Glad you have your FBI check with Apostille; so time to pack your stuff and come to Peru.

      All the best
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Gyan Penrose-Kafka · 23/02/2023
    Currently, in the USA there is no reason to use an Apostille service as that will not expedite anything and will just cost extra money. This is due to the US Dept. of State's Authentication department not accepting in-person requests. Instead, fill out the form DS-4194, and send it, a $20/document (not page) check/money order and a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. I sent mine Priority Mail Flat Rate, which cost me just under $20 for both sending and the return envelope. All in all, $47 for the FBI Background Check (I used the service listed in the message above which was fast and easy and I had my report in a few hours), $20 fee for the Apostille, and $20 for postage.  
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 23/02/2023
      @Gyan Penrose-Kafka
      Hello Gyan,

      thank you for sharing your experience. I'm sure your description is helpful to other US nationals getting their FBI criminal record check while being in the US.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Liv Osland · 26/02/2023
      @Gyan Penrose-Kafka Did you send your FBI documents in first, receive them, and then send them with the DS-4194 to another service? Or is it possible to do it at the same time?
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Martin Odenell · 13/12/2022
    Hola.

    Thanks for the highly detailed and clear residence guidance in English on your site.
    Impressive work and very helpful !

    >International document corresponding to the Antecedentes policiales, penales and judiciales in Peru

    >If you already went through the process of getting the correct document in your home country, please share your experience; great would be the name of the document, who is in charge of issuing it and any other info you are willing to share. Thank you.

    ---

    New Zealand.

    'Ministry of Justice' 'Criminal Record Check'.

    https://www.police.govt.nz/faq/how-do-i-get-a-police-clearance-certificate
    If you are asked for a ‘police clearance certificate’, ‘police record’, ‘police file’, ‘police check’, or ‘criminal check’, a copy of your criminal record from the Ministry of Justice should meet the requirements. If you have no convictions, you will receive a letter stating that is the case.

    https://www.justice.govt.nz/criminal-records/
    https://www.criminalrecords.govt.nz/
    Request a free New Zealand Criminal Record Check
    which is emailed to you within three working days.

    (then)

    'Department of Internal Affairs' 'Apostille'.

    https://www.govt.nz/browse/passports-citizenship-and-identity/proving-and-protecting-your-identity/use-your-nz-documents-overseas/

    https://www.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Passports-citizenship-and-identity/Request-a-document-authentication-or-apostille.pdf

    The New Zealand 'Department of Internal Affairs'
    will verify your electronic 'Criminal Record Check' directly with the 'Ministry of Justice'.

    You can apply and pay for a:
    - Paper Apostille.
    - e-Apostille.
    - Couriered to a New Zealand address.
    - Couriered to an overseas address.

    New Zealand 'Apostille' processing time is approximately seven working days.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 13/12/2022
      @Martin Odenell
      Hello Martin.

      thank you so much for sharing more info on the Antecendentes "equivalent" and the process of getting the criminal record check in New Zealand. I highly appreciate that you took the time writing to me.

      I will add New Zealand above and hopefully some "Kiwis" coming to Peru can benefit from your explanation.

      Thanks again.

      Greetings
      Eva

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