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Peruvian Retirement Visa

Peruvian Retirement Visa

A Guide to Peruvian Visas

Part 8

Retirees and pensioners who receive a state or private pension or other benefits (for example a disability pension) of at least US$ 1000 per month or the equivalent in any other currency can apply for a permanent residency in Peru called Rentista Visa.

For each dependent (such as a spouse) who should be included in the visa, the proof of an additional US$ 500 is required.

Please be aware that you are not allowed to work or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru when living in the country on a retirement visa and that you must have a clean criminal record.

Officially, you can apply for the retirement visa at a Peruvian consulate abroad or at Migraciones in Peru. However, some diplomatic missions, especially in countries where nationals can enter Peru as a tourist without having to apply for a tourist visa at a consulate first, either don’t or prefer not to issue resident visas or processing times can be long as Migraciones in Peru has to approve the application. And even if you already get your retirement visa abroad once in Peru you still have to deal with Migraciones, even though to a lesser extent, to get your carné.

So, most people planning to live in Peru as a retiree enter the country as a tourist and then change their immigration status - make a so called Cambio de calidad migratoria (as opposed to a Solicitud de calidad migratoria at a consulate) - at Migraciones.

Requirements for a Peruvian retirement visa

In mid-July 2021 the new TUPA (Texto Unico de Procedimientos Administrativos; Single Text of Administrative Procedures) went into effect, which is mainly based on the Peruvian Supreme Decree DS N° 002-2021-IN. This new legislation changes a few immigration processes, procedures, and requirements for some Migraciones paperwork.

So below, find the requirements according to the July 2021 TUPA. As the document is quite confusing, we recommend that those who prefer to read the original requirements either check out the official website of Peru or better the corresponding text passage of the Supreme Decree DS N° 002-2021-IN on page 46 in article 92-A “Procedimiento administrative de solicitud de calidad migratoria rentista residente” (when applying at a Peruvian consulate) or in article 92-B “Procedimiento administrative de cambio de calidad migratoria rentista residente” (when applying in Peru). However, please be aware that Migraciones has the right to request other and / or additional documents at any time.

Anyway, as soon as you arrive in Peru, you should get organized and start the whole process. Please note that you have to be in the country on a valid visa (for example a tourist visa or "authorization to enter as a tourist") when applying for the visa in Peru.

Here now the requirements and a walk-trough of the application process in Peru.

Required documents to apply for a retirement visa include, but may not be restricted to:

  • Interpol clearance - Ficha de canje internacional (see below)
  • Receipt for paid application fee (code Migraciones 07568 S/.162.50 in 2021)
  • Passport (you will have to upload the page with your personal data and the one with the entry stamp as PDF)
  • Letter from your pension fund or social security stating that you receive a monthly income of at least US$ 1000 or the equivalent in any other currency. This letter needs an Apostille from the respective public institution in the country of origin (or has to be legalized by a Peruvian consulate abroad and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Peru). Once in Peru the document has to be translated into Spanish by an official translator. (*)
  • Sworn statement stating that your pension enters Peru through the banking system; see sample letter on page 383 of the Tupa PDF document
  • Police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check issued in the country of origin and, if the applicant lived in another country before coming to Peru, in the country of residence covering the last 5 years (**)
  • Sworn statement issued by a notary in Peru stating that you wish to apply for a rentista visa and confirming that you can fulfil the requirements and don't intend to work. (***)

(*) Before (!!!) leaving your home country request the document from your pension fund or social security and get it apostilled if your country signed the Apostille Convention; otherwise it has to be legalized by different authorities in your home country and the Peruvian consulate. The problem with both processes is that the letter needs an official signature to be apostilled or legalized. As most pension statements are generated automatically they are usually not signed. So, it might be quite a mission in your home country to get it signed. One of our reader informed us that for US citizens with this problem the US Embassy in Lima was very helpful and issued a notarized letter that was accepted by the Peruvian immigration office.

(**) This is a new requirement for the application of a retirement visa according to the Supreme Decree 002-2021-In. While for the past years a sworn statement stating that you have a clean criminal record and no previous convictions was enough to satisfy Migraciones, now it is necessary to provide a police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check issued in the country of origin and, if the applicant lived in another country before coming to Peru, in the country of residence covering the last 5 years. This as well needs an Apostille or has to be legalized and translated into Spanish.

(***) Even though not on the requirement list, neither of the old law nor now of the new law, Migraciones asked for this sworn statement for years. So, best prepare yourself that you might have to present it. Notaries usually have this form document (Declaracion jurada) on hand. Be aware that before you are able to sign it legally in Peru, you have to apply for a permission to sign contracts (permiso especial para firmar contratos). Since January 2018 this can be easily done online. Our article "Permit to sign contacts in Peru" explains how it works and what you need.

Applying for a retirement visa is a simple and straightforward process, but might be a little confusing here and there if you are not familiar with the process and the steps involved. Please see our walk-through below as general guidance which should offer enough information that you don't need to hire a lawyer or so-called tramitador, but can start and finish this little endeavor on your own. However, be aware that requirements and processes change quickly and at least basic Spanish skills are required to fill in forms and understand instructions.

Getting started …

Hopefully you brought the letter from your pension fund or social security as well as the Police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check already apostilled or legalized - see requirements and (*) and (**) above. Once in Peru this has to be translated by an official translator (and if you only have a legalization on the document, the translation has to be legalized again by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Lima). You can find a list of these state-approved translators either on the website of your Embassy in Peru or here.

When this is taken care of you have to get the sworn statement issued by a notary - see requirements and (***). First apply for the “Permit to sign contacts” and when you have it, visit a notary.

Make PDFs from your passport (page with your personal data and the one with the entry stamp), from a passport photo and your signature; and from the sworn statements.

And the last step before you can finally apply for your retirement visa is getting the so-called “Ficha de Canje Internacional” from Interpol in Peru. Find a detailed description on how it’s done in our article “Interpol - Ficha de Canje Internacional”.

Applying for a retirement visa in Peru

Once you have the Ficha and all documents together, pay the fee of S/ 162.50 (2021) for the Migraciones administrative procedure “Cambio de Calidad Migratoria” under code 07568 at any Banco de la Nacion branch / ATM or on pagalo.pe. As you already paid the Interpol fee, you know how the systems works, otherwise check again in our article "Paying administration charges and processing fees in Peru".

!!!Please note!!! Since the introduction of the new immigration law, not only did some procedures and requirements change but also lots of codes needed to pay Migraciones fees. Until now pagalo.pe isn’t updated and it’s not possible – at least at the moment – to pay online. So unfortunately, you have to pay all Migraciones related fees at the counter of a Banco de la Nacion branch.

Then it's time to apply for your retirement visa - if you need to leave the country during the application process, you have to apply for a special travel permit before you leave the country, otherwise your application is null and void.

Open the Migraciones Agencia Digital. Choose "Extranjero" and enter the data requested. Enter your personal data exactly as in your passport.

On the next page you find on the left under “Cambio de Calidad Migratoria” the point “Rentista Residente”. Click on it.

Then just follow the steps as indicated; nothing you can do wrong. Always check that all personal data you entered (or was automatically filled in) is 100% correct and as in your passport. If you apply for the first time your signature and passport photo might not be in the system yet. So, you have to download the App "Enrolamiento Móvil Migraciones" (available for Android and iOS), then scan the code that appears on the Agencia Digital and upload your photo and signature - there are rumors that this feature might be included soon into the Agencia Digital.

During the process - under “Pago por derecho de tramite” - you are asked to enter certain information of the bank receipt (click on the little arrow and the fields appear). If you don't know where to find the requested bank information on your receipt, click on the question mark.

Under “Documento de identificacion adminstrado” (click on the little arrow and the fields appear - here you can as well just check which documents are necessary and then leave the page without finishing the process), you have to upload requested documents as PDF.

At the end of the process - if everything works smoothly - you get the confirmation of your application. Download this document and / or print it and keep it safe! At the end of this document, you find the login data for the “Buzon Electronico” which you should check regularly for notifications from Migraciones (for example approval of your visa or request of uploading missing / other documents).

Getting your Carné (foreigner ID)

Once you get the confirmation that your retirement visa was approved, pay the fee of S/ 49.90 (2021) for the registration in the foreigner database and issuance of the carné. As described above at the moment you can only pay at any Banco de la Nacion branch.

Then once again enter the Agencia Digtal to do the online registration under “Inscr. Reg. central extranjeria”. As before just follow the steps as indicated, check that all information is correct. At the end you get a confirmation which you should download and / or print and keep safe!

With the confirmation in hand or on your mobile device, the carné is in the process of issuance and you can make an appointment on the Agencia Digital under “Citas en linea” to pick it up. Once again download and / or print the confirmation and keep it safe!

On the day of your appointment arrive at Migraciones 15 – 30 minutes early. Take your passport and confirmation(s) with you. Migraciones personal will point you to the right direction where you are handed you carné.

Congratulations! You made it!

As long as you don't leave Peru for more than 183 consecutive days in a 365-day period, you have an indefinite residence permit. You are exonerated from extending your visa every year.

Please note: We from LimaEasy are not the Peruvian immigration authority Migraciones or a Peruvian consulate. All information is published to our best knowledge and should be seen as general guidance introducing you to Peruvian procedures. All information is subject to change, as regulations, requirements and processes can change quickly without prior notice! Therefore we recommend checking the current regulations with the nearest Peruvian consulate or, if you are already in Peru, with Migraciones!

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  • This commment is unpublished.
    David Martin · 17/11/2021
    FYI, my friend in AQP told me to Google seguros para adultos mayores en Peru, and a bunch of https links popped up like this one: https://queplan.pe.  Must have been a change in the law, but would ever know it in Peru.  So, see what you think.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 17/11/2021
      @David Martin Interesting, thank you for sharing. I tried it out, entering "man, 75 years in Arequipa" and it showed a few options. Can't believe it.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    David Martin · 13/11/2021
    Among the dozens of hurdles, here is another: insurance. Maybe it's easy for those under 65 to apply for private insurance in Peru, quite apart from the government system, but if you're over 75, I'd say it's impossible and one would be stuck with the government system which, let's face it, is ranked fairly low. I did find one group in Lima, but I would be in Arequipa. This is likely a deal breaker, but let's see if anyone knows more about this than I do. Thanks
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/11/2021
      @David Martin
      Hello David,

      yes, you are absolutely right. Finding a private health insurance in Peru if you are over 65 or 70 is difficult, over 75 nearly impossible. However, there are two options you could try.

      Many private clinics in Peru offer their own health plans. So, it might be worth checking out some private hospitals in Arequipa, such as Clinica San Pablo, Sanna/Clinica del Sur Arequipa or Clinica Arequipa, and see if and what they offer for this age group.

      Or the other option would be to check out expat / global health insurance providers covering Peru.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    David Encersen · 25/10/2021
    Dear you wrote: Please be aware that you are not allowed to work or receive a remuneration for any kind of professional activity in Peru. My question is, what is, if i do, trading with stocks on stockmarket and make some few transactions individual not commerical and not professional, maybe 5-10 transaction to rebalance my portfolio. With a win so that i have also to pay a Capital Gain, Will be this complicated ? Allowed? What are you reccomend me? Dont touche, buy and hold still getting the Peruan Citizien. Iam also not allowed to buy Property to get a passive Income nor to rent some appartements on Airbnb ? Please need some advises.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 26/10/2021
      @David Encersen Hello David,

      Foreigners living in Peru on a retirement visa are exempted from the tax liability, so they can’t earn any money in Peru. As far as I’m aware, this includes generating capital and stock market gains in Peru as well as earning rental income in Peru (however, you can buy a property in Peru with no problems).

      I‘m not a tax or financial specialist and therefore highly recommend contacting one who knows all this stuff and the implications by heart, but you could, for example, trade with stocks outside Peru and have any gains deposited into an account outside Peru.

      If you plan to apply for Peruvian citizenship in a few years, things are completely different. Then you, of course, can work, earn whatever you want, but must pay taxes in Peru for any income generated in Peru and worldwide. Here as well, I can only recommend getting legal advice from a specialist.

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    David Herron · 30/09/2021
    I am an older senior in Tucson, AZ, starting the process for Ecuadoran residency, but preferring Peru for different reasons. Many stumbling blocks, but one of the most confusing is police clearance. I understand the Interpol ficha, but it is entirely unclear if I need to obtain an apostilled FBI report (usually electronic through a channeler) with 6 months "vigencia" as well. What's the $18.00 for if not an FBI report, apparently initiated by Interpol? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 30/09/2021
      @David Herron
      While for years a sworn statement that you have a clean record was sufficient, the new Foreigner Law explicitly states that everyone applying for a residency in Peru must present a "police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check issued in the country of origin". And over the last few weeks we got feedback that Migraciones enforces this new rule and won't accept the sworn statement anymore.

      Additionally, you have to pay Interpol in Peru a visit to get the "ficha de canje" which certifies that you aren't an internationally wanted fugitive, so haven't got an international wanted persons notice (Red Notice). That's all MIgraciones wants.

      The money order in the amount of US$ 18 was / is for an additional check from the the federal police body, in your case the FBI; this check has nothing to do with Migraciones and I don't know why US, Canadian and Australian nationals have to do it. Doesn't make sense to me and with the new rules in place shouldn't be necessary anymore, but Interpol still request the money order.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      David Herron · 30/09/2021
      @Sunflower This is much appreciated. It may solve the problem if "police clearance certificate, criminal record and judicial matters check issued in the country of origin" means FBI background check, which is required by Ecuador and is apostilled in DC. I have no problem with that. However, if it means something else, then I don't know. AZ is one of those states that does not issue a background check, i.e., closed state. Won't do it. There is a workaround for Eca, however. Pima County is probably doable, but useless, and not sure what "criminal check is" unless it's the FBI Identity Summary.

      So, just have so see what others are doing.  But thanks.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Tania · 28/09/2021
    I can’t thank you enough for how helpful this site was in getting me through the process of my rentista visa ! It was the best and most accurate information I found anywhere on the internet at the time.

     I too am from California as Paul who commented in July. The Peruvian consulate in San Francisco told me my proof of pension needed to be apostilled at the state capital in Sacramento. I called and spoke with a super helpful person. She said to bring a letter from my pension and for me to write a declaration stating that the amount I receive stated in the letter is accurate and then sign it. They stapled the documents together and apostilled my sworn statement and this was accepted at immigration in Peru with no problem. 

    The only thing that stumped me during this whole rentista visa process in Peru was having my pension check enter a bank there. The banks would not allow me to open an account with a tourist visa. In the end I just wrote and signed a paper saying that I was withdrawing my money through the banks in Peru (I use banco de la Nacion atm, charges no fee) from my U.S. bank. This was accepted and I was approved for the rentista visa.

    My question is concerning the 6 month requirement. If for whatever reason I failed to comply, an emergency in my home country or other un expected situation, I understand the visa would be revoked. Would there be an option of accepting a fine for passing the 6 months ? If not, would I be able to reapply ? Would I have to wait a period of time before they would allow me to apply again ?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/09/2021
      @Tania Hello Tania,

      Thank you so much for the praise. You really made my day. I’m happy that our article helped you get through the visa application.

      Thank you as well for taking the time to share your experience with us. And you are right, the “Sworn statement stating that your pension enters Peru through the banking system” is confusing, so I will update the article, hopefully making it clearer and explain available and accepted options.

      Regarding your questions: You are correct, while you now have an indefinite residency status in Peru, you must stay in Peru at least 183 days per year, otherwise you will lose your residency. There is no option to pay a fine if you are outside of Peru longer.

      However, if for whatever reasons you have to be outside Peru for a longer period of time, you can apply for a special authorization, the so-called “Autorización de estadía fuera del país”; be aware that you must apply for it before leaving Peru.

      This authorization is intended for:

      a) foreigners having to leave Peru during the approval process of their residence visa or during the extension process of the residence visa (which doesn’t apply to you)

      b) foreigners with a valid residency who have to leave Peru for more than 183 days (see Decreto Supremo 002-2021-IN, page 21 of the document under 67.2.2). If granted, you can stay outside Peru for up to 365 consecutive days.

      If you didn't apply for the authorization before leaving Peru and stayed outside longer than 183 days, you will lose your residence status. You then enter Peru as a tourist and can re-apply immediately, but of course need to fulfill the then current requirements (including new Interpol clearance, new letter from your pension fund, new sworn statements, etc.).

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Tania · 28/09/2021
      @Sunflower Thank you for your reply Eva. The praise is well deserved, your article gave us the confidence to apply for the visa on our own.

       When my husband and I arrived in Peru we went to immigration to get a list of requirements for the visa to make sure nothing had changed. The list too said the pension had to enter a bank in Peru. Thankfully they accepted the wording of our statement.

      We actually were in the middle of the process when the pandemic hit. We stayed in Peru til the visa was approved then returned to U.S. in December before the 2nd wave hit Peru to be with family. It was initially decreed that during the state of emergency in Peru the 183 day limit would not be enforced. We are still in the U. S. at this time. I understand that recently a new decree was passed that beginning August 20, 2021 they would start counting the days again for any Rentista Visa resident outside of Peru. Is this correct ?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 29/09/2021
      @Tania Yes, that's the way I interpret the new decree for rentistas well; counting from the day the decree went into effect you should have half a year to reenter. However, I hope that the immigration officer you have to face, when returning to Peru, agrees.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mikael · 28/08/2021
    I received the Rentista Visa. And wait for the card. So after 2 years I can apply for citizenship, right? Without paying a fee during these 2 years. Don't want you to tell me you should have done this and that, and this was due, so it wasn't possible. For others who have the other types of visa, even if they switch to permanent, the 183-day rule always applies. The woman from Migraciones on the receiver said that I could then switch to permanent so I was confused.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/08/2021
      @Mikael Hello Mikael,

      As said before, I didn’t get your question and it seems to me that your point got lost in translation. You said you got a retirement visa and asked for a change to a permanent (visa) which is pointless as the retirement visa is a permanent visa. Now you are talking about applying for Peruvian citizenship, a completely different thing.

      And I still don’t understand which 183 days rule you are referring to. Regarding the retirement visa (and other permanent residence visas) the only rule is that you have to stay in Peru for 183 days within a 365-day period. You can’t overstay your retirement visa. It’s impossible, as the visa allows you to live in Peru indefinitely. That’s the facts, no matter what someone at Migraciones told you. And I don’t know which fee you are talking about. As you can’t overstay (the retirement visa is NOT limited in time, but valid for an indefinite period), there is no overstaying fee. And as you don’t have to extend the retirement visa, there is no fee for extending. Sorry, I don’t get it. Once you get your card, have a look at it. On the front you will find “indefinido”.

      And no, I’m not telling anyone what to do. I’m sharing my knowledge here on this page trying to make things easier for foreigners in Peru and, if necessary, offering my help to people like you to get an insight into Peruvian bureaucracy, answer questions to the best of my knowledge and clarify uncertainties based on my experience and current Peruvian laws and regulations.

      As I have the feeling that we talk past one another, it’s probably the best that for your planned application to become a Peruvian citizen you read the Ley de Nacionalidad No. 26574 and the changes of it published in the Supreme Decree 002-2021-IN (starting on page 53).

      Greetings
      Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mikael · 28/08/2021
    Hello, once time i got the rentista visa can i change to permanet? If yes, still the rule 183 Days, will be valid or, can overstay? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/08/2021
      @Mikael Hello Mikael,

      I’m not sure if I understand your question correctly. The retirement visa is a permanent, indefinite residency that doesn’t have to be extended. So, once you get it, you can legally stay in the country as resident forever; at least if you are not outside Peru for more than 183 consecutive days per year (if you have to leave Peru for a longer period, you can apply for a special authorization allowing you to be abroad for up to a year).

      So, it’s impossible to overstay your retirement visa (this is a problem you might have with a tourist or other temporary visa). The only thing you have to make sure is to not “understay”, so to be in Peru for at least half a year in a 365-day period.

      Greetings Eva
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Selina · 11/08/2021
    another blog told this visa does not even exist! This was very helpful, thanks! but sadly as all Latin countries it,s an overwhealming process, same for Panama or Nicaragua...the Apostilles and the way they treat people is awful! like we are all criminals that wanna hide something! 
    thanks for that info! Peru is mostly tax free on foreign income, i say mostly bcs that might not count for all expats🤷‍♀️
    Selina💋
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 11/08/2021
      @Selina Hello Selina,

      I can't comment on the quality of other websites; but we try our best to explain the sometimes complicated and confusing Peruvian bureaucratic processes as simply and correctly as possible, so our readers get an insight in what's awaiting them.

      You should be aware that Peru is one of the countries worldwide with the easiest regulations to get a retirement visa. It might seem overwhelming at first, but once you are sure your destination is Peru and you get organized, it's just a matter of working one step at a time until you reach your goal: a permanent residency in Peru. Will there be times you think you can’t make it? Most probably. Will there be times you will be fed up with the whole process and be distressed? Most probably. Will there be times you feel treated unfairly? Most probably. But as many, many people before you can make it. And having to get an Apostille on a document, which just certifies its authenticity for the use in another country, might be annoying, but is international standard. How else would, for example, a Peruvian immigration officer know that your Austrian pension statement is a valid document and not designed by yourself on your computer?

      Anyway, before deciding to make Peru or any other country your permanent home, I highly recommend visiting first and getting to know the country and people. The European style “warm clean place and affordable prices” you are looking for as described in your second comment which I can’t publish (sorry, no relation to Peru or the retirement visa and testing the limits of our submission guidelines) might not be that easy to find in Peru without compromising a bit. Additionally, you should be aware that once you leave your home country, you are the foreigner in your new, adopted country where it is expected that you follow the country’s rules and regulations (even though they might be strange or annoying to you) and accept the way things are done without complaining. Sometimes, a difficult task.

      I really hope that you find the right place for you soon. If it’s Peru, and you have any more questions, feel free to contact me again.

      Greetings
      Eva
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Selina · 11/10/2021
      @Sunflower Hi, Eva! thanks dor your friendly reply and all the hard worl you put into. I.m well aware of the hurdles, it is just a very big pile in comparsion to what the EU asks for, so i basically threw that difference eith me back in my mind while typing.
      Clean and warm, when you know all the problems clean countries like Austria have here i. Europe, you might understand that I did not expect heaven.And yes, I basically follow the rules in countries i visit🤷‍♀️the written and unwritten ones.
      But thanks for your warnings, too many just see the colorful pretty tourist/holiday side even when there and break into tears when confronted with every day life , which is basically the same everywhere.
      Best wishes from Austria, which is starting to slide into winter mode now🤣Selina
      and yes, your info is the best and most accurate so far...my questioning was not a critic but just a question, bsc i really found the "nonretirement option" on several infosites.
      take cae! 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Selina · 11/10/2021
      @Sunflower and no: In Austria print forms from public ofgices have mot such a low quality that you can fake them on a common printer, they have a digital signature, are printed according to a standardized morm, same for police record clearance and such,...so i was not aware that in ,many countries it,s still not daily standard to use forms from their national PrintingAgency.
      it has become worse, yes...but i can..honestly spoken...even print that Apostille i got in Austria too🤷‍♀️
      the other point people are rarely aware of is that besides the EU and Canada basically no other public service provides multi lingual service! so for people like me with low Spanish knowledge it.s all a bit frightening...so i brush it up☺️and pay a lawyer to help me...these few hundreds are worth having a smooth ride through the process, the rest so far is : collecting your papers, collecting your Apostilles and stamps, then do everything in the given order( it.s just step by step and mot all at once...but that didfers from country to country) ...the embassy in Vienna is very friendly and helpful! you even can read the good reviews online...☺️giving them a call is no problem here either( a sorted list of points for wuestions and something to take notes is essential, don.t overrun the friendly personell with confusing calls!) SR
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Paul · 28/07/2021
    July 28, 2021 - I like the clarity of this article, very helpful.  I am in this process and the getting the apostille from the Department of State for my Social Security benefits letter has a strong learning curve.  I had hope with your recommendation to call the US Embassy in Lima and they said they do not do this and the website also says they do not do notary services for Social Security documents. Now my local Social Security office California needs to convince the District office in S.F. that they are the only ones that can help me.  They said they stopped doing it and sent me to "Social Security International Operations".  When I did, they made it clear to my local office they do not do this.  I hope too make progress next week.  I can share more if helpful.  
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 28/07/2021
      @Paul Thank you so much for sharing your experience so far. And yes, please let us know about your progress. I'm sure that many of our readers have the same obstacles to overcome and are thankful for any insight. As far as I was told, the US Social Security benefits letter is a federal government document and only can get the Apostille from the Secretary of the District of Columbia in Washington, DC or the US Department of State in Washington, DC not any district office. What a shame that the US embassy doesn't seem to be of any help on these matters anymore. I wish you all the best and hopefully quick success.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      David Herron · 30/09/2021
      @Sunflower A notary handling my apostilles in Arizona contacted both the SS district office (Tucson) and a colleague in DC. No to both for official signatures. Ecuador will allow self-sworn SS benefits letter, but I suppose not Peru.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 30/09/2021
      @David Herron You are right. As many people from different countries have the problem that the statements are not signed, at least before Corona some embassies (including the US embassy in Lima) confirmed the authenticity of the document. The embassy didn't notarize the document, but issued a letter stating that this is an official US SS statement valid without signature; and Migraciones accepted that.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      David Herron · 30/09/2021
      @Sunflower Thanks for the input. Gets to be more trouble than it's worth, assuming cooperation of US Embassy on this, but then it has to be notarized and apostilled (AZ Secy of State, I guess), and then translated besides. Again, EC will take my signature on it, then notarized, then apostilled by AZ Secy of State.  Begins to look like too many hoops for an almost 80 year old.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Uri Barg · 19/07/2021
    Hi I was wondering if would be able to obtain a rentista visa in Peru through income of rental properties in my country... any idea if it is possible? 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 19/07/2021
      @Uri Barg Even though lots is possible n Peru, as far as i'm aware rental income unfortunately isn't accepted. You need to have proof of an "official", regular and permanent income such as a pension, other official benefits, bank assets that generate interests, dividends from a company or similar.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      David Herron · 30/09/2021
      @Sunflower This comment is the most helpful after trying to clarify through dubious Internet sources for awhile, now. I expect a gross SS of $1102, including the 2022 COL, BUT, the Medicare premium reduces to a gross less than the required. HOWEVER, my trust fund is doing well with principal around $xxx. I get monthly interest/dividends around $xxx and have for years. Would such combination (of course with notarized and apostilled bank letter from Trust Officer, an attorney) be a workaround acceptable to Migracion? What do you think?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 30/09/2021
      @David Herron
      Hello David,

      I deleted the amount of your trust fund and monthly generated interest; nothing the whole world needs to know.

      Anyway, if on the statement of your SS medicare is deducted and you fall under the US$ 1000 limit, yes you can combine the SS with your monthly interests and Migraciones should accept it.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      David Herron · 30/09/2021
      @Sunflower Very helpful to me and other readers, as well. Thanks so much.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Salith · 03/06/2021
    This is interesting. But I was looking to know the options of Nomad visa. Seems like this will qualify for that purpose. 
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 12/06/2021
      @Salith Unfortunately, Peru doesn’t have a visa type for digital nomads. And the retirement visa is only in a few cases a work-around. To get a rentista visa, you need to prove a regular and permanent income (pension, other official benefits, bank assets that generate interests, dividends from a company or similar) of at least US$ 1000 a month. Additionally, the retirement visa doesn’t allow you to work or make money in Peru; so your earnings can’t directly be deposited in Peru.

      Another option for digital nomads to get residency in Peru is to set up a company and then employ yourself, which allows you to apply for a work visa as an employee of your own company. While it’s a quite straightforward process, there are still a few hurdles to conquer, especially if you aren’t used to Peruvian bureaucracy and procedures. So if you want to go this way, I highly recommend using an experienced immigration lawyer and / or notary to help you get everything done.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Salith · 13/06/2021
      @Sunflower I appreciate your reply. I would also need to look the tax rates for setting a company and individual taxes. But thank you for your reply!!!

    • This commment is unpublished.
      Sunflower
      • LimaEasy
      · 14/06/2021
      @Salith Yes, you are right. Taxes are one of the many things you have to consider when setting up a company in Peru. Therefore, it is important to inform yourself in detail about all the little obligations and specifics before choosing this way. To give you a general overview, you can find an introduction into Peruvian Company & Corporation types, How to set up a company and Corporate Considerations in our Business Guide under Business Information; https://www.limaeasy.com/peru-guide/business-guide-peru/business-information. For all the little details we highly recommend talking to a pro. All the best.

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